Alistair Horne

W&N

Hubris

Alistair Horne
Authors:
Alistair Horne

Alistair Horne has been a close observer of war and history for more than fifty years. In this wise and masterly work, he revisits six battles that changed the course of the twentieth century and reveals the one trait that links them all: hubris. From the Battle of Tsushima in the Russo-Japanese War of 1905 to Hitler's 1941 bid to capture Moscow, and from the disastrous American advance in Korea to the French surrender at Dien Bien Phu, Horne shows how each of these battles was won or lost due to excessive hubris on one side or the other.A dramatic, colourful and stylishly written history, HUBRIS is an essential reflection on war from a master of his field.

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Napoleon

Alistair Horne
Authors:
Alistair Horne

The definitve account of Napoleon's rise to power by one of our greatest historians.On June 25, 1807, Napoleon met and embraced his recent foe, Tsar Alexander I of Russia, on a raft in the middle of the River Niemen near Tilsit. This theatrical but historic occasion represented the pinnacle of Napoleon's glory. The Tsar was forced to accept an alliance dividing Europe into two spheres of influence, and Napoleon became supreme ruler of the continent of Europe west of Russia.Alistair Horne traces Napoleon's ascent to power in the years preceding this climax to his political and military career: the success of the "peace machine," the formation of the impressive Grande Armee and the abortive plan to invade England. The author examines in detail the strategic success of the Ulm-Austerlitz campaign in 1805 - "the first great battle of modern history" - in which Napoleon decisively defeated the Austro-Russian army. With the ensuing double victory of Jena-Auerstadt in 1806 and the defeat of the Prussians, Napoleon became undisputed master of Central Europe. In 1807, the Battle of Eylau, resulting in a draw - after which he admitted that his "soul was oppressed to see so many victims" - led to his crushing victory at Friedland which set the seal on the campaigns begun two years previously.

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Friend or Foe

Alistair Horne
Authors:
Alistair Horne
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But What Do You Actually Do?

Alistair Horne
Authors:
Alistair Horne

A sparkling memoir by one of our greatest historians.This wonderfully entertaining journey takes us from Alistair Horne's childhood as a wartime evacuee in America to his career as a highly successful historian and biographer, via a stint as a foreign correspondent for the Daily Telegraph. We travel with him from Germany to America, from Canada to France, from Latin America to the Middle East. A consummate biographer, the pages of Horne's 'Literary Vagabondage' abound with vivid character sketches of the friends and foes that have shaped his life.

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Kissinger's Year: 1973

Alistair Horne
Authors:
Alistair Horne

The life of Henry Kissinger seen through one seminal year - 1973.1973 was a seminal year in world history. The outbreak of the 'Yom Kippur War' took both Israel and the US by surprise, the Vietnam War finally ended, it was the year of détente with the Soviet Union, but the US executive was in a state of collapse following Watergate, and the year ended with the Muslim-initiated energy crisis, which brought the Western world to the brink of economic disaster - a story of deepest relevance today.This book is the biography of Kissinger - the first he has authorised - viewed through the events of this crucial year. A story of his extraordinarily imaginative aims, his near successes, and, as he admits, his ultimate failures.

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The Terrible Year

Alistair Horne
Authors:
Alistair Horne

Alistair Horne

Alistair Horne was educated at Le Rosey, Switzerland, and Jesus College, Cambridge. He ended his war service with the rank of Captain in the Coldstream Guards attached to MI5 in the Middle East. From 1952 to 1955 he worked as a foreign correspondent for the DAILY TELEPGRAPH. In 1969 he founded the Alistair Horne research fellowship in modern history, St Antony's, Oxford. His numerous books on history and politics have been translated into over ten languages, he was awarded the Hawthornden prize (for THE PRICE OF GLORY) and the Wolfson prize (for A SAVAGE WAR OF PEACE). In 1992 he was awarded the CBE; in 1993 he received the French Légion d'Honneur for his work on French history and a Litt.D. from Cambridge University; in 2003 he was knighted for services to Franco-British relations. He died in 2017.