Nicholas Monsarrat

W&N

Three Corvettes

Nicholas Monsarrat
Authors:
Nicholas Monsarrat

This is how the war at sea really was...Nicholas Monsarrat's war, in those dark years of 1939-1945, was a ferocious, unforgiving, terrible war: the Battle of the Atlantic. An RNVR officer, he served on His Majesty's corvettes, tough little ships charged with the impossible task of seeing vital convoys safely through the packs of marauding U-boats. Between watches he kept a record of life on board, the good times and the bad, true tales of heroism, fear and all too often death. This was the war at sea as it really was. The three books were sensationally published even while the war raged about him, and make a fascinating prelude to the post-war The Cruel Sea.Also in this edition are his other short pieces on the sea, including the stories HMS Marlborough Will Enter Harbour and The Ship That Died of Shame. Here is some of the most dramatic literature of the sea ever written, from one of the finest writers of his generation.

W&N

The Kappillan of Malta

Nicholas Monsarrat
Authors:
Nicholas Monsarrat

'One of the most memorable characters of post-war fiction' Daily ExpressA classic novel set in the siege of Malta 1940-1942 from the bestselling author of The Cruel SeaFather Salvatore was a simple, lumbering priest, a Kappillan serving the poor Valetta, when war came out of the blue skies to pound the island to dust.Now amid the catacombs discovered by a chance bomb, he cared for the flood of homeless, starving, frightened people who sought shelter from the death that fell unceasingly from the sky.His story, and the story of Malta, is told in superbly graphic pictures of six days during the siege. Each of those days brought forth from the Kappillan a message of inspiration to keep them going - the legendary tales of six mighty events of Malta's history which shone through the centuries and gathered them together in a fervent belief in their survival.

Nicholas Monsarrat

Nicholas Monsarrat was born in Liverpool in 1910, and was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge. He served in World War II, first as a member of an ambulance brigade and then as a member of the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve. His lifelong love of sailing made him a capable naval officer, and he served with distinction on a series of small warships. Resigning his wartime commission in 1946, Monsarrat entered the diplomatic service. He turned to writing full time in 1959, settling on the Mediterranean island of Gozo. He died in 1979 and was buried at sea from a destroyer, off Portsmouth.