Kurt Vonnegut - Cat's Cradle - Orion Publishing Group

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Cat's Cradle

By Kurt Vonnegut

  • Hardback
  • £8.99

One of America's greatest writers gives us his unique perspective on our fears of nuclear annihilation

One of America's greatest writers gives us his unique perspective on our fears of nuclear annihilation

Experiment.

Told with deadpan humour and bitter irony, Kurt Vonnegut's cult tale of global destruction preys on our deepest fears of witnessing Armageddon and, worse still, surviving it.

Solution.

Dr Felix Hoenikker, one of the founding fathers of the atomic bomb, has left a deadly legacy to the world. For he is the inventor of ice-nine, a lethal chemical capable of freezing the entire planet. The search for its whereabouts leads to Hoenikker's three eccentric children, to a crazed dictator in the Caribbean, to madness. Felix Hoenikker's death-wish comes true when his last, fatal, gift to mankind brings about an end that, for all of us, is nigh.

Biographical Notes

Born in 1922, Kurt Vonnegut (1922-2007) was a prisoner of war in Dresden, Germany, during the saturation bombing which devastated the city near the end of the Second World War, an experience which formed the basis for the novel which made him a world-wide bestseller, Slaughterhouse-Five. Cat's Cradle, first published in 1963, is his third novel.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9780575081956
  • Publication date: 20 May 2010
  • Page count: 224
  • Imprint: Gateway
Gateway

The Sirens Of Titan

Kurt Vonnegut
Authors:
Kurt Vonnegut

Alan Furst

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Alastair Reynolds

Alastair Reynolds was born in Barry, South Wales, in 1966. He studied at Newcastle and St Andrews Universities and has a Ph.D. in astronomy. He stopped working as an astrophysicist for the European Space Agency to become a full-time writer. REVELATION SPACE and PUSHING ICE were shortlisted for the ARTHUR C. CLARKE AWARD; REVELATION SPACE, ABSOLUTION GAP, DIAMOND DOGS and CENTURY RAIN were shortlisted for the BRITISH SCIENCE FICTION AWARD and CHASM CITY won the BRITISH SCIENCE FICTION AWARD.You can learn more by visiting www.alastairreynolds.com, or by following @AquilaRift on twitter.

Alex Lamb

Alexander Lamb splits his time between writing science fiction, software engineering, teaching improvised theater, running business communication skills workshops, and conducting complex systems research.He is currently working on mobile applications for the publishing industry, and also on the large-scale simulation of battlefields for the US Department of Defense, for the purposes of enabling the evacuation of soldiers by robot. He currently lives in Santa Cruz, CA with his wife, Genevieve Graves, an astrophysicist also at the university there, and their three month old son.

Arthur Conan Doyle

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859 -1930) was a Scottish physician and writer, most noted for his stories about the detective Sherlock Holmes, which are generally considered a major innovation in the field of crime fiction, and for the adventures of Professor Challenger. He was a prolific writer whose other works include science fiction stories, historical novels, plays and romances, poetry, and non-fiction. The first two Sherlock Holmes novels, A STUDY IN SCARLET and THE SIGN OF FOUR, were published in 1887 and 1890, but it was the publication in the STRAND MAGAZINE from 1891 onwards of the immortal short stories, starting with 'A Scandal in Bohemia', that brought him real fame. The complete canon was voted the greatest crime series of all time by the Mystery Writers of America.

Brandon Sanderson

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Charles Sheffield

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Elizabeth May

Elizabeth May is a professional photographer who has worked for an array of magazines and publishing houses. She is currently living in Edinburgh where she is studying anthropology while writing her next novel.You can learn more at www.elizabethmaywrites.co.uk or by following @_ElizabethMay on twitter.

Elspeth Cooper

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Henry Kuttner

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Iain M. Banks

Iain Menzies Banks (1954-2013) was born in Fife, and was educated at Stirling University, where he studied English Literature, Philosophy and Psychology. Banks came to widespread and controversial public notice with the publication of his first novel, The Wasp Factory, in 1984. His first science fiction novel, Consider Phlebas, was published in 1987. He continued to write both mainstream fiction (as Iain Banks) and science fiction (as Iain M. Banks), and was acclaimed as one of the most powerful, innovative and exciting writers of his generation. He died in 2013.

Isaac Asimov

Isaac Asimov (1920 - 1992)Isaac Asimov was one of the most famous, honoured and widely read science fiction authors of all time. Born in Russia but raised in the USA, his career as an SF writer began in 1939 with 'Marooned Off Vesta', in Amazing Stories. His output was prolific by any standards - in a career spanning five decades, he wrote more than four hundred books, won six Hugos, two Nebulas and the SFWA Grand Master Award, among many others, and provided pleasure and insight to millions of readers. He died in 1992 at the age of 72.