Karel Capek - RUR & War with the Newts - Orion Publishing Group

Time remaining

  • -- days
  • -- hours
  • -- minutes
  • -- seconds
Books in this series

RUR & War with the Newts

By Karel Capek

  • Paperback
  • £9.99

Two dystopian satires from one of the most distinguished writers of 20th-century European science fiction. R.U.R. is the work that first introduced the word 'robot' into popular usage.

Written against the background of the rise of Nazism, War With the Newts concerns the discovery in the South Pacific of a sea-dwelling race, which is enslaved and exploited by mankind. In time they rebel, laying siege to the strongholds of their former masters in a global war for supremacy.

R.U.R., or Rossum's Universal Robots, seen by many as a modern interpretation of the 'golem' myth, is regarded as the most important play in the history of SF. It introduced the word 'robot' and gave the genre one of its most enduring tropes.

Biographical Notes

Karel Capek (1890-1938) was one of the most important Czech writers of the 20th century and a major voice in early European science fiction. His work traversed many genres, and his most famous play, R.U.R., introduced the word 'robot' into popular usage. He died on Christmas Day 1938.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9780575099456
  • Publication date: 13 Oct 2011
  • Page count: 368
  • Imprint: Gateway
Two cautionary (and visionary) tales that show us full well that man is at the top of the evolutionary chain through no real merit of his own. — Graeme Flory, GRAEME'S FANTASY BOOK REVIEW Blog
Gateway

War with the Newts

Karel Capek
Authors:
Karel Capek

One of the great anti-utopian satires of the twentieth century, an inspiration to writers from Orwell to Vonnegut, at last in a modern translation. Man discovers a species of giant, intelligent newts and learns to exploit them so successfully that the newts gain skills and arms enough to challenge man's place at the top of the animal kingdom. Along the way, Karel Capek satirizes science, runaway capitalism, fascism, journalism, militarism, even Hollywood.

Gateway

RUR

Karel Capek
Authors:
Karel Capek

R.U.R. - written in 1920, premiered in Prague in 1921, and first performed in New York in 1922 - garnered worldwide acclaim for its author and popularized the word 'robot'. Mass-produced as efficient laborers to serve man, Capek's Robots are an android product-they remember everything but think of nothing new. But the Utopian life they provide ultimately lacks meaning, and the humans they serve stop reproducing. When the Robots revolt, killing all but one of their masters, they must strain to learn the secret of self-duplication. It is not until two Robots fall in love and are christened "Adam" and "Eve" by the last surviving human that Nature emerges triumphant.

James Blish

James Blish (1921-75) studied microbiology at Rutgers and then served as a medical laboratory technician in the US army during the Second World War. Among his best known books are Cities in Flight, A Case of Conscience, for which he won the Hugo in 1959 for Best Novel, Doctor Mirabilis, Black Easter and The Day After Judgement.

James E Barry

.

James Tiptree, Jr.

James Tiptree Jr (1915-1987)Alice Hastings Bradley Sheldon wrote most of her fiction as James Tiptree, Jr - she was making a point about sexist assumptions and also keeping her US government employers from knowing her business. Most of her books are collections of short stories, of which Her Smoke Rose Up Forever is considered to be her best selection. Sheldon's best stories combine radical feminism with a tough-minded tragic view of life; even virtuous characters are exposed as unwitting beneficiaries of disgusting socio-economic systems. Even good men are complicit in women's oppression, as in her most famous stories 'The Women Men Don't See' and 'Houston, Houston, Do you Read?' or in ecocide. Much of her work, even at its most tragic, has an attractively ironic tone which sometimes becomes straightforwardly comedy - it is important to stress that Tiptree's deep seriousness never becomes sombre or pompous. Her two novels Up the Walls of the World and Brightness Falls from the Air are both remarkable transfigurations of stock space opera material - the former deals with a vast destroying being, sympathetic aliens at risk of destruction by it and human telepaths trying to make contact across the gulf of stars. She died tragically in 1987.

Joe Haldeman

Joe Haldeman was born in Oklahoma in 1943 and studied physics and astronomy before serving as a combat engineer in Vietnam, where he was severely wounded and won a Purple Heart. The Forever War was his first SF novel and it won both the Hugo and Nebula awards, a feat which The Forever Peace repeated. He is also the author of, among others, Mindbridge, All My Sins Remembered, Worlds, Worlds Apart and Worlds Enough and Time.

Joe Hill

Joe Hill is a recipient of the Ray Bradbury Fellowship and the winner of the A.E. Coppard Long Fiction Prize, William Crawford, World Fantasy, British Fantasy, Bram Stoker and International Horror Guild Awards. His short fiction has appeared in literary, mystery and horror collections and magazines in Britain and America.For more information, visit www.joehillfiction.com, visit joehillsthrills.tumblr.com, or follow @Joe_Hill on twitter.

John Brosnan

John Brosnan (1947 - 2005)John Raymond Brosnan was born in Perth, Australia, in 1947 but lived in London for all his adult life. He wrote most of the film entries in the first edition of The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, and his influential books on the movies, include the seminal The Horror People, Future Tense: The Cinema of Science Fiction and The Primal Screen: A History of Science Fiction Film, as well as a number of acclaimed fantasy and SF novels. He died in 2005.

John E. Muller

John E. Muller is a pseudonym for Lionel Fanthorpe.

John W. Campbell

Born in New Jersey in 1910, John W. Campbell studied physics at MIT and then Duke University. Although a prolific early pulp writer - he made his first sale while still in his teens and was a recognised name in the genre by the time he was 21 - it was as an editor that he is best remembered. In 1937 he was appointed editor of Astounding Stories (now Analog), and over the next few decades would have an enormous influence on the field. He continued as editor of Astounding until his death in 1971.

Justin Cronin

Born and raised in New England, Justin Cronin is a multi-award-winning writer. He is Professor of English at Rice University, and lives with his family in Houston, Texas.

Karel Capek

Karel Capek (1890-1938) was one of the most important Czech writers of the twentieth century and a major voice in early European science fiction. His work traversed many genres, and his most famous play, R.U.R., introduced the word 'robot' into popular usage. He died on Christmas Day 1938.

Karen Joy Fowler

Karen Joy Fowler is the author of four earlier novels and two short story collections. Her debut novel, Sarah Canary, was a New York Times Notable Book, as was her second novel, The Sweetheart Season. Fowler's short story collection Black Glass won the World Fantasy Award in 1999. Fowler and her husband, who have two grown children, live in Davis and Santa Cruz, California.

Karl Zeigfreid

Karl Zeigfreid is a pseudonym for Lionel Fanthorpe.

Keith Topping

Full-time survivor, dandy highwayman, bon vivant, author, journalist and broadcaster yer actual Keith Topping's bibliography includes over 40 books; he was the co-editor of two editions of The Guinness Book of Classic British TV and has written or co-written volumes on TV series as diverse as The X-Files, Star Trek, The Avengers, 24, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Angel and Stargate SG-1, as well as music and film critique. He authored four Doctor Who novels (including the award-winning The Hollow Men, with Martin Day) and a novella. His work includes two editions of the acclaimed West Wing guide Inside Bartlet's White House, A Vault of Horror: A Book of 80 Great (and not-so-great) British Horror Movies, Do You Want to Know a Secret?: A Fab Anthology of Beatles Facts and Doctor Who: The Discontinuity Guide. Keith was a regular contributor to numerous TV and genre magazines and was a former Contributing Editor to DreamWatch. He is widely considered one of Britain's foremost experts on the bewildering complexities of US network television. No, he hasn't the faintest idea why either.

Kristen Britain

Kristen Britain lives in New Mexico where she writes full time and pursues interests including reading, guitar playing, and illustration. She enjoys exploring the magical places around her and can often be found paddling a canoe in stillwater, ambling through the woods to mountain summits, or sitting along the rocky shore listening, watching, and daydreaming.To learn more, visit her website at www.kristenbritain.com.

L. Sprague deCamp

Lyon Sprague de Camp was born in 1907 and died in 2000. During a writing career that spanned seven decades, he wrote over a hundred books in the areas of science fiction, fantasy, historical fiction, non-fiction and biography. Although arguably best known for his continuation of Robert E. Howard's Conan stories, de Camp was an important figure in the formative period of modern SF, alongside the likes of Isaac Asimov and Robert A. Heinlein, and was a winner of the Hugo, World Fantasy Life Achievement and SFWA Grand Master awards.

Lee Barton

Lee Barton is a pseudonym for Lionel Fanthorpe.

Leigh Brackett

Leigh Brackett (1915-1978)Leigh Brackett was an accomplished and prolific writer of fantasy and SF, as well as a Hollywood screen writer. She worked on scripts for films such as The Big Sleep, The Long Goodbye and Rio Bravo, and received a posthumous Hugo Award for the script for The Empire Strikes Back. Brackett was married to fellow SF writer Edmond Hamilton from 1946 until his death in 1977.

Leo Brett

Leo Brett is a pseudonym for Lionel Fanthorpe.