Bestselling Fiction & Non-Fiction Authors, from The Orion Publising Group
Our Authors
Robin W. Bailey

Robin W. Bailey, a lover of fantasy and science fiction for as long as he can remember, has devoted years of his life to writing in the fantasy/science fiction genre. His works include SWORDS AGAINST THE SHADOWLAND, SHADOWDANCE, FROST, BLOODSONGS, and SKULL GATE. Bailey served as the Central/South Regional Director of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America for nine years and has been the President of the organiation for two years (2005-2007). He is also one of the founders and board members of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Hall of Fame and a member of the Kansas City Science Fiction and Fantasy Society. He is an avid book collector and a fan historian. Bailey's interests include music, martial arts, body-building, soccer, and cycling.
Edwin Balmer

Edwin Balmer (1883-1959) Edwin Balmer, born in Chicago, began his career as a reporter for the Chicago Tribune in 1903. He then went on to write for books and magazines, becoming an editor of Redbook in 1927 and then later associate publisher. With Philip Wylie, Balmer co-wrote When Worlds Collide (1933) and After Worlds Collide (1934), the former being adapted for the big screens in the 1951 award-winning film of the same title. Balmer died in 1959, aged 75.
Rory Barnes

Rory Barnes is the author of ten novels for both adults and teenagers, five of which have been written in collaboration with Damien Broderick. His website is at http://users.bigpond.net.au/rory.barnes.
James E Barry

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Lee Barton

Lee Barton is a pseudonym for Lionel Fanthorpe.
Barrington J. Bayley

Barrington J. Bayley (1937-2008) was born in Birmingham and began writing science fiction in his early teens. After serving in the RAF, he took up freelance writing on features, serials and picture strips, mostly in the juvenile field, before returning to straight SF. He was a regular contributor to the influential New Worlds magazine and an early voice in the New Wave movement.
Clare Bell

Born in England in 1952, Clare Bell moved to the US in 1957. She worked in oceanography, electrical engineering, test equipment design and mechanical engineering before she wrote her first book, Ratha's Creature (Atheneum-Argo Margaret K .McElderry 1983), the story of a prehistoric wildcat who learns to tame fire. Since then she has continued to write fantasy and science fiction for children and adults. She says, 'I am still fascinated by prehistoric animals and big cats, as showcased in the five Ratha series novels. I consider my two little cats, Danny and Athena, to be research assistants as well as companions and have learned a lot from them.' 'My stories show sociological themes as well, exploring the changes that are brought about in culture through technology, even one as crude as fire. I also enjoy creating plausible and workable prehistoric animal and alien characters. The central theme of my fiction is evolution, a result of my being influenced early by the works of C.S. Lewis, Olaf Stapledon , and Arthur C. Clarke. '
Thornton Bell

Thornton Bell is a pseudonym for Lionel Fanthorpe.
John Bellairs

John Bellairs is beloved as a master of gothic young adult novels and fantasies. His series about the adventures of Lewis Barnavelt and his Uncle Jonathan, which includes THE HOUSE WITH A CLOCK IN ITS WALLS, is a classic. He also wrote a series of novels featuring the character Johnny Dixon. Among the titles in that series were THE CURSE OF THE BLUE FIGURINE; THE MUMMY, THE WILL, AND THE CRYPT; THE SPELL OF THE SORCERER'S SKULL and others. His solo novel THE FACE IN THE FROST is also regarded as a fantasy classic and among his earlier works are ST. FIDGETA AND OTHER PARODIES and THE PEDANT AND THE SHUFFLY. He was a prolific writer, publishing more than a dozen novels before his untimely death in 1991.
Gregory Benford

Gregory Benford (1941 - ) A leading writer of 'Hard SF', Gregory Albert Benford was born in Alabama in 1941. He received a BSc in physics from the University of Oklahoma, followed by an MSc and PhD from the University of California, San Diego. His breakthrough novel, Timescape, won both the Nebula and John W. Campbell Memorial Awards, and he has been nominated for the Hugo Award four times and the Nebula twelve times in all categories. Benford has undertaken collaborations with David Brin and Arthur C. Clarke among others and, as one of the 'Killer Bs' (with Brin and Greg Bear) wrote one of three authorised sequels to Isaac Asimov's Foundation series. He has also written for television and served as a scientific consultant on Star Trek: The Next Generation. Gregory Benford lives in California, where he is currently Professor of Plasma Physics and Astrophysics at the University of California, Irvine, a position he has held since 1979.
David Bischoff

David Bischoff is an American SF author. Born in Washington D.C. and now living in Eugene, Oregon, Bischoff writes science fiction books, short stories, and scripts for television. Though he has been writing since the early 1970s, and has had over 80 books published, Bischoff is best known for novelizations of popular movies and TV series including the Aliens, Gremlins, Star Trek: The Next Generation, and WarGames.
Michael Bishop

Michael Bishop was born in 1945 and studied English at the University of George. He won the Nebula Award for best novel in 1983 with No Enemy But Time. His other acclaimed novels include A Funeral for the Eyes of Fire, Transfigurations, Stolen Faces and Ancient of Days.
James P. Blaylock

James P. Blaylock (1950 - ) James Paul Blaylock was born in Long Beach, California, in 1950, and attended California State University, where he received an MA. He was befriended and mentored by Philip K. Dick, along with his contemporaries K.W. Jeter and Tim Powers, and is regarded - along with Powers and Jeter - as one of the founding fathers of the steampunk movement. Winner of two World Fantasy Awards and a Philip K. Dick Award, he is currently director of the Creative Writing Conservatory at the Orange County High School of the Arts, where Tim Powers is Writer in Residence.
James Blish

James Blish (1921-75) studied microbiology at Rutgers and then served as a medical laboratory technician in the US army during the Second World War. Among his best known books are Cities in Flight, A Case of Conscience, for which he won the Hugo in 1959 for Best Novel, Doctor Mirabilis, Black Easter and The Day After Judgement.
Steven R. Boyett

Steven R. Boyett was born in Atlanta, Georgia, grew up all over Florida, and attended the University of Tampa on a writing scholarship before quitting to write his first novel, Ariel, when he was nineteen. Soon after Ariel was published he moved from Florida to Los Angeles, California, where he continued to write fiction and screenplays as well as teach college writing courses, seminars, and workshops. He has published stories in literary, science fiction, fantasy, and horror anthologies and magazines, as well as publishing articles and comic books. In the early Nineties his imprint Sneaker Press published chapbooks by the poets Carrie Etter and the late Nancy Lambert. Steve has also been a martial arts instructor, professional paper marbler, advertising copywriter, proofreader, tyepsetter, writing teacher, and Website designer and editor. In 2000 Steve took some time off from writing. He learned to play the didgeridoo and began composing and DJing electronic music.
Ray Bradbury

Ray Bradbury wrote more than 500 short stories, novels, plays, screenplays, television scripts and poems. Lauded as one of America's most elegant and poetic writers, acclaimed by many to be the inventer of dark fantasy, he won many major awards, including the World Fantasy Award for Life Achievement and being named a Nebula Grandmaster.
Marion Zimmer Bradley

Marion Zimmer Bradley (1930 - 1999) Marion Zimmer was born in Albany, New York, in 1930, and grew up across the Hudson River on a farm in East Greenbush. She married Robert Alden Bradley in 1949. She received a B.A. from Hardin Simmons University, Texas, and did post-graduate work at the University of California, Berkeley, during which time she helped found the Society for Creative Anachronism. She sold her first story in 1952 and was a writer of note for over four decades. Bradley is best known for two signature series: the 'Darkover' science fantasy series and her Arthurian masterpiece, The Mists of Avalon and its sequels. She also edited anthologies for 14 years and published Marion Zimmer Bradley's Fantasy Magazine, which ran for 50 quarterly issues between 1988 and the end of 2000. Marion Zimmer Bradley died in Berkeley, California, on September 25, 1999, four days after suffering a major heart attack.
Jeff Bredenberg

Jeff Bredenberg (1953 - 2010) Jeff Bredenberg spent the first two decades of his publishing career working for newspapers, primarily writing and editing in Chicago, Denver, St. Louis and four other cities. He was an independent writer and editor specializing in how-to and health topics, and wrote, edited, or contributed to more than 25 books. He was also a frequent contributor to home-oriented magazines and made frequent media appearances, including spots on the Late Show With David Letterman. He published three science fiction novels - The Dream Compass, The Dream Vessel and The Man in the Moon Must Die - plus several short stories in magazines and anthologies. Jeff Bredenberg died in 2010.
Leo Brett

Leo Brett is a pseudonym for Lionel Fanthorpe.
David Brin

David Brin is a scientist, speaker, technical consultant and world-known author. His novels have been New York Times Bestsellers, winning multiple Hugo, Nebula and other awards. At least a dozen have been translated into more than twenty languages