Bestselling Fiction & Non-Fiction Authors, from The Orion Publising Group
Our Authors
Avram Davidson

Avram Davidson (1923 - 1993)Avram Davidson was born in New York in 1923 and was active in SF fandom from his teens. He is remembered as a writer of fantasy fiction, science fiction and crime fiction, as well as many stories that defy easy categorisation. Among his SF and Fantasy awards are two Hugos, two World Fantasy Awards and a World Fantasy Life Achievement award; he also won a Queen's Award and an Edgar Award in the mystery genre. Although best known for his writing, Davidson also edited The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction from 1962 to 1964. He died in 1993.
Grania Davis

Grania Davis is an American SF author.
Martin Day

Martin Day has written eighteen novels, audiobooks and non-fiction titles, usually concerning television in general or Doctor Who in particular. He is a regular writer on BBC1's Doctors, having previously worked on Channel 5's Family Affairs and been lead writer on CBBC's Crisis Control. He has also written plays, comic strips, short stories and journalism, and currently has a film in development in the USA. His hobbies include kendo, kickboxing, roleplaying games, and standing as an unsuccessful candidate in local elections.
L. Sprague de Camp

Lyon Sprague de Camp was born in 1907 and died in 2000. During a writing career that spanned seven decades, he wrote over a hundred books in the areas of science fiction, fantasy, historical fiction, non-fiction and biography. Although arguably best known for his continuation of Robert E. Howard's Conan stories, de Camp was an important figure in the formative period of modern SF, alongside the likes of Isaac Asimov and Robert A. Heinlein, and was a winner of the Hugo, World Fantasy Life Achievement and SFWA Grand Master awards.
Catherine Crook de Camp

Catherine Crook de Camp (1907-2000) was an American SF and fantasy writer. She mainly worked in collaboration with her husband, L. Sprague de Camp.
L. Sprague deCamp

Lyon Sprague de Camp was born in 1907 and died in 2000. During a writing career that spanned seven decades, he wrote over a hundred books in the areas of science fiction, fantasy, historical fiction, non-fiction and biography. Although arguably best known for his continuation of Robert E. Howard's Conan stories, de Camp was an important figure in the formative period of modern SF, alongside the likes of Isaac Asimov and Robert A. Heinlein, and was a winner of the Hugo, World Fantasy Life Achievement and SFWA Grand Master awards.
Catherine Crook deCamp

Catherine Crook de Camp (1907-2000) was an American SF and fantasy writer. She mainly worked in collaboration with her husband, L. Sprague de Camp.
John DeChancie

John DeChancie is a popular author of numerous science fiction/fantasy novels including the hugely entertaining Castle series and the Starrigger trilogy. He grew up near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and now lives in Los Angeles, California.
Stephen Dedman

Stephen is the author of the novels The Art of Arrow Cutting (Tor, 1997) and Foreign Bodies (Tor, 1999), and the non-fiction book Bone Hunters: On the Trail of the Dinosaurs (Omnibus, 1998). His short stories have appeared in an eclectic range of magazines and anthologies, including The Year's Best Fantasy & Horror, Little Deaths, Asimov's, F&SF, Science Fiction Age, Interzone, Weird Tales, and Realms of Fantasy. His work has won the Aurealis Award and Australian Science Fiction Achievement Award, and been shortlisted for the Bram Stoker Award, the British Science Fiction Association Award, and the Sidewise Award for Alternate History. Stephen lives in Western Australia, and enjoys reading, travel, movies, complicated relationships, talking to cats, and startling people.
Samuel R. Delany

Samuel R. Delany (1942 - ) Samuel Ray 'Chip' Delany, Jr was born in Harlem in 1942, and published his first novel at the age of just 20. As author, critic and academic, his influence on the modern genre has been profound and he remains one of science fiction's most important and discussed writers. He has won the Hugo Award twice and the Nebula Award four times, including consecutive wins for Babel-17 and The Einstein Intersection. Since January 2001 he has been a professor of English and Creative Writing at Temple University in Philadelphia, where he is Director of the Graduate Creative Writing Program. For more information see www.sf-encyclopedia.com/entry/delany_samuel_r
Gordon R Dickson

Gordon R. Dickson (1923 - 2001) Gordon Rupert Dickson was born in Alberta, Canada, in 1923 but resided in the United States from the age of thirteen. Along with Robert A. Heinlein, he is regarded as one of the fathers of military space opera, his Dorsai! sequence being an early exemplar of both military SF and Future History. Dickson was one of the rare breed of authors as well known for his fantasy as his SF - The Dragon and the George, the first novel in his Dragon Knight sequence, was shortlisted for the World Fantasy Award and won the British Fantasy Award. Dickson's work also won him three Hugos and Nebula. He died in 2001.
William C. Dietz

William C. Dietz is the author of more than thirty science fiction novels. He grew up in the Seattle area, spent time with the Navy and Marine Corps as a medic, graduated from the University of Washington, lived in Africa for half a year, and traveled to six continents. Dietz has been variously employed as a surgical technician, college instructor, news writer, television producer and currently serves as Director of Public Relations and Marketing for an international telephone company. He and his wife live in the Seattle area where they enjoy traveling, boating, snorkeling, and, not too surprisingly, reading books.
Shane Dix

Shane Dix is a science fiction writer perhaps best known for his collaborations with Sean Williams. With Sean Williams, Shane Dix has produced the EVERGENCE series (three volumes), the ORPHANS OF EARTH series (three volumes) and the GEODESICA series (two volumes). They also co-wrote the STAR WARS: NEW JEDI ORDER: FORCE HERETIC trilogy. Together, they have been called "the new Niven & Pournelle for the 21st century".
Larry Dixon

Larry Dixon is both a fantasy artist and author who studied at The North Carolina School of the Arts and The Savannah College of Art & Design. He married Mercedes Lackey, with whom he collaborated on a number of novels, in 1992. They live in Tulsa, Oklahoma, and run a sanctuary for birds of prey and an aviary for exotic birds.
Stephen Donaldson

Stephen Donaldson lived in India for 13 years with his father, a medical missionary, who worked extensively with lepers; it was here that he conceived the character of Thomas Covenant. He was awarded the John W. Campbell Award as Best Writer of the Year for The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant The Unbeliever, which, with the sequel trilogy, became instant bestsellers. He is also the author of the fantasy duology 'Mordant's Need', the SF epic quintet 'The Gap', and a number of mysteries written under the pseudonym Reed Stephens. He won the World Fantasy Award in 2000. The four books of The Last Chronicles of Thomas Covenant have been acclaimed worldwide.
Richard Dreyfuss

Richard Dreyfuss is an Oscar-winning actor.
Lord Dunsany

Lord Dunsany (1897-1957)Born in London of an Anglo-Irish family that could trace its roots back to the twelfth century, Edward John Moreton Drax Plunkett, 18th Baron Dunsany, was a globetrotter, sportsman, hunter, poet, playwright and chessplayer. He wrote The Gods of Pegana in 1904, which became an unexpected succès d'estime and was followed by several collections which have been an insporation for modern fantasy writers.
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