Bestselling Fiction & Non-Fiction Authors, from The Orion Publising Group
Our Authors
R. A. MacAvoy

R. A. MacAvoy (1949 - ) Roberta Ann MacAvoy was born in Ohio in 1949, and has been a full-time writer for almost 30 years. She is a highly acclaimed author of imaginative and original science fiction and fantasy novels. Her debut novel, Tea With The Black Dragon, was shortlisted for the Hugo, Nebula, World Fantasy and Philip K. Dick Awards. The year it was published, 1984, MacAvoy won the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer. Her other works include the Damiano trilogy, The Book Of Kells, Twisting The Rope and the beloved and much-praised Lens Of The World trilogy.
Katherine MacLean

Katherine MacLean (1925- )Katherine Anne MacLean is an American science fiction writer best known for her short stories of the 1950s. Born in Glen Ridge, New Jersey, MacLean received a BA in economics from Barnard College, New York, and did postgraduate study in psychology. Her first published short story was "Defense Mechanism", which appeared in Astounding in October 1949. Over the decades MacLean has continued to write whilst being employed in a wide variety of jobs - as book reviewer, economic graphanalyst, editor, EKG technician, food analyst, laboratory technician in penicillin research, nurse's aide, office manager and payroll bookkeeper, photographer and pollster, to name a few. Much of her later work features psi powers as a central theme.
Barry N. Malzberg

Barry N. Malzberg (1939-) Barry N. Malzberg is an American writer, editor and agent, whose prolific career has spanned numerous genres - most notably crime and science fiction. Malzberg was particularly active in the science fiction scene of the early seventies, although he became disillusioned with the market forces defining the field, and has rarely published SF works since. His most recent activity in the field has been in the form of advice columns for writers in the quarterly magazine of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. Barry N. Malzberg has been shortlisted for numerous awards, including the Hugo, Nebula and Philip K. Dick.
George R.R. Martin

George R.R. Martin published his first story in 1971 and quickly rose to prominence, winning four HUGO and two NEBULA Awards in quick succession before he turned his attention to fantasy with the historical horror novel FEVRE DREAM, now a Fantasy Masterwork. Since then he has won every major award in the fields of fantasy, SF and horror. His magnificent epic saga A Song of Ice and Fire is redefining epic fantasy for a new generation, and is the basis for the hit HBO series GAME OF THRONES. George R.R. Martin lives in New Mexico.Read more at http://sf-encyclopedia.com/entry/martin_george_r_r
Adrienne Martine-Barnes

Adrienne Martine-Barnes (1942 -) Born in Los Angeles in 1942, Adrienne Martine-Barnes has always had a strong interest in fantasy, and particularly in Norse and Celtic mythology. As an author, her writing has been influenced by Tolkien, Norton and Moorcock and she has contributed to Marion Zimmer-Bradley's well-known Darkover series with titles such as The Shadow Matrix and Traitor's Sun.
David I. Masson

David I. Masson (1915 - 2007) David Irvine Masson was born in Edinburgh from a distinguished family of academics and thinkers. Although his output was small and consisted entirely of short stories, he gained a reputation as a writer of vigorous experimental SF. All of his short science fiction is published in the collection 'The Caltraps of Time'. He died in Leeds in 2007.
Richard Matheson

Richard Matheson (1926-2013)Richard Matheson was born in 1926. He began publishing SF with his short story 'Born of Man and Woman' which appeared in The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction in 1950. I Am Legend was published in 1954 and has been adapted to film three times. Matheson wrote the script for the film The Incredible Shrinking Man, an adaptation of his second SF novel The Shrinking Man (published in 1956). The film won a Hugo award in 1958. He wrote many screenplays (including The Fall of the House of Usher) as well as episodes of The Twilight Zone. He continued to write short stories and novels, some of which formed the basis for film scripts, including Duel, directed by Steven Spielberg in 1971. Further SF short stories were collected in The Shores of Space (1957) and Shock! (1961). His other novels include Hell House (1971) (filmed as The Legend of Hell House in 1973), Bid Time Return (1975), Earthbound (1982) and Journal of the Gun Years (1992). A film of his novel What Dreams May Come (1978) was released in 1998, starring Robin Williams. A collection of his stories from the 1950s and 1960s was released in 1989 as Richard Matheson: Collected Stories. He died in 2013.
Julian May

Julian May (1931-)Julian May is an American science fiction, fantasy, horror, science and children's writer who also uses several literary pseudonyms. She is best known for her Saga of the Pliocene Exiles series (The Saga of the Exiles in the UK) and her Galactic Milieu trilogy
Maureen F. McHugh

Maureen F. McHugh was born in Loveland, Ohio, and educated at Ohio University and New York University. She taught in Chinafor a year, and her experiences there and in New York formed the basis of her first novel, China Mountain Zhang. She has lived in New York City, Shijiazhuang, China, and Austin, Texas. She currently resides in Los Angeles, California.
J. T. McIntosh

J T McIntosh (1925 - 2008)J. T. McIntosh was the pseudonym used by Scottish writer and journalist James Murdoch MacGregor, under which all of his SF writing appeared (with the exception of a single story). Born in Paisley, Scotland, in 1925, he began publishing science fiction in 1950 with 'The Curfew Tolls', which appeared in John W. Campbell's Astounding Science Fiction magazine. His first novel, World Out of Mind, appeared three years later, and he continued to write novels of interest over the next decade and a half, but ceased publishing work after 1980. He died in 2008.
Robert A. Metzger

Robert A. Metzger (1956 - ) Robert A. Metzger has spent his entire life in the Los Angeles area, including his stint at UCLA where he received a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering, and his current stint at the Hughes Research Laboratories in Malibu where he grows thin film materials for high speed transistors by a process called Molecular Beam Epitaxy. His short stories have appeared in Aboriginal SF and Weird Tales, and he writes a science column called "What If?" which appears in Aboriginal SF. He lives with no cute pets, has no endearing hobbies, and hates yogurt with a passion that most people reserve for axe-murderers. He reads supermarket tabloids, refuses to wash his car, and has managed to convince several people that lettuce is his favourite food.
Walter M. Miller Jr

Walter M. Miller Jr (1923- 1996)Walter Michael Miller Jr grew up in the American south. He enlisted in the Army Air Corps a month after Pearl Harbor and spent most of the war as a radio operator and gunner, participating in fifty-five combat sorties over Italy and the Balkans, including the assault on Monte Cassino. After the war he studied engineering before turning to writing. A Canticle for Leibowitz won a Hugo Award, and his only other novel, Saint Leibowitz and the Wild Horsewoman was published posthumously.
P. Schuyler Miller

P. Schulyer Miller (1912-1974)Peter Schuyler Miller was an American science fiction writer and critic. Miller was raised in New York's Mohawk Valley, which led to a life-long interest in the Iroquois Indians. He pursued this as an amateur archaeologist and a member of the New York State Archaeological Association.He received his M.S. in chemistry from Union College in Schenectady. He subsequently worked as a technical writer for General Electric in the 1940s, and for the Fisher Scientific Company in Pittsburgh from 1952 until his death.Miller died October 13, 1974 in Blennerhassett Island, West Virginia. He was on an archaeological tour to the 'Fort Ancient Civilization' site west of Parkersburg at the time.
Marvin Minsky

Marvin Minsky is an American scientist and author of several academic texts.
Judith Moffett

Judith Moffett (1942 - )Judith Moffett is an American author and academic who began her career writing poetry before turning to SF with an ape-as-human tale, "Surviving", for The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction in June 1986. She gained immediate attention by winning the first Theodore Sturgeon Award in 1987 and her reputation was further enhanced with the publication of her first novel, Pennterra, in the same year. The following year she received the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer.
Donald Moffitt

Donald Moffitt was born in Boston and now lives in rural Maine. A former public relations executive, industrial filmmaker, and ghostwriter, he has been writing fiction on and off for more than twenty years under his own name and an assortment of pen names. His first full-length science-fiction novel and the first book of any genre to be published under his own name was THE JUPITER THEFT (Del Rey, 1977).
Richard Monaco

Richard Monaco has written several fiction and non-fiction books including PARSIVAL OR A KNIGHTS TALE, THE GRAILWAR, THE FINAL QUEST, BIZARRE AMERICA 2 and THE DRACULA SYNDROME. He has also written plays, novellas, screenplays and poetry. Monaco is the director of the Author Development Agency and helped found The Adele Leone Literary Agency. He was also the director of Wildstar Books, the Editor-in-Chief of New York Poetry magazine and taught for The New School for Social Research and Mercy College.
Michael Moorcock

Michael Moorcock (1939-)Michael Moorcock is one of the most important figures in British SF and Fantasy literature. The author of many literary novels and stories in practically every genre, his novels have won and been shortlisted for numerous awards including the Hugo, Nebula, World Fantasy, Whitbread and Guardian Fiction Prize. In 1999, he was given the World Fantasy Life Achievement Award; in 2001, he was inducted into the SF Hall of Fame; and in 2007, he was named a SFWA Grandmaster. Michael Moorcock is also a musician who has performed since the seventies with his own band, the Deep Fix; and, as a member of the prog rock band, Hawkwind, won a gold disc. His tenure as editor of New Worlds magazine in the sixties and seventies is seen as the high watermark of SF editorship in the UK, and was crucial in the development of the SF New Wave. Michael Moorcock's literary creations include Hawkmoon, Corum, Von Bek, Jerry Cornelius and, of course, his most famous character, Elric. He has been compared to, among others, Balzac, Dumas, Dickens, James Joyce, Ian Fleming, J.R.R. Tolkien and Robert E. Howard. Although born in London, he now splits his time between homes in Texas and Paris.
C.L. Moore

C.L. Moore (1911-1987) was born in Indianapolis and became a leading author of science fantasies for WEIRD TALES in the 1930s. After her marriage to fellow SF writer Henry Kuttner in 1940 she concentrated on writing science fiction, usually in collaboration with her husband. She turned to screenwriting after his untimely death; her TV series included MAVERICK and 77 SUNSET STRIP.
Ward Moore

* #42 in the Millennium SF Masterworks series, a library of the finest science fiction ever written. * ¿Seminal . . . concise and elegiac¿ Encylopedia of Science Fiction * ¿A classic alternative world story¿ Brian Aldiss * ¿One of the best American writers¿ Ray Bradbury