Bestselling Fiction & Non-Fiction Authors, from The Orion Publising Group
Our Authors
Victor La Salle

Victor La Salle is a pseudonym for Lionel Fanthorpe.
Josephine Saxton

Josephine Saxton (1935 -) Josephine Mary Howard was born in Halifax, Yorkshire, in 1935 and from the mid-60's produced a body of highly regarded sceicne fiction novels and short stories under the name Josephine Saxton. Her 1986 novel Queen of the States was nominated for the 1987 Arthur C. Clarke Award. She lives in Warwickshire.
Elizabeth Scarborough

Elizabeth Ann Scarborough was born March 23, 1947, and lives in the Puget Sound area of Washington. Elizabeth won a Nebula Award in 1989 for her novel The Healer's War, and has written more than a dozen other novels. She has collaborated with Anne McCaffrey, best-known for creating the Dragonriders of Pern, to produce the Petaybee Series and the Acorna Series.
Melissa Scott

Melissa Scott is from Little Rock, Arkansas, and studied history at Harvard College and Brandeis University, where she earned her PhD. in the comparative history program with a dissertation titled "The Victory of the Ancients: Tactics, Technology, and the Use of Classical Precedent." In 1986, she won the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer, and won Lambda Literary Awards in 1995 and 1996 for Shadow Man and Trouble and Her Friends, having previously been a three-time finalist (for Mighty Good Road, Dreamships, and Burning Bright). Trouble and Her Friends was also shortlisted for the Tiptree Award. Her most recent novel, The Jazz, was published by Tor Books in the summer of 2000, and Point of Dreams, a collaboration with long-time co-author Lisa A. Barnett, came out in the fall of that year. Her first work of non-fiction, Conceiving the Heavens: Creating the Science Fiction Novel, was published by Heinemann in 1997. She lives in New Hampshire with her partner of twenty years.
Garrett P. Serviss

Garrett Putman Serviss (1851-1929)Garrett Putman Serviss was an American astronomer and early science fiction writer. He was born in upstate New York and majored in science at Cornell University. He also studied law at Columbia University although he never worked as an attorney, instead becoming a journalist for The New York Sun in 1876. At the end of 1897, Serviss was commissioned to write an unofficial sequel to an equally unofficial 1897 revision of H. G. Wells' The War of the Worlds which set the action in America. Edison's Conquest of Mars first appeared in the New York Evening Journal as "The Conquest of Mars".For more information see http://sf-encyclopedia.com/entry/serviss_garrett_p
Carol Severance

Carol Severance (1944-2015)Carol Severance was a Hawaii-based writer with a special interest in Pacific Island peoples and their environments. After growing up in Denver, she served with the Peace Corps and later assisted in anthropological fieldwork in the remote coral atolls of Truk, Micronesia. She died in 2015.
Bob Shaw

Bob Shaw (1931 - 1996) Bob Shaw was born in Belfast in 1931. After working in engineering, aircraft design and journalism he became a full time writer in 1975. Among his novels are Orbitsville, A Wreath of Stars, The Ragged Astronauts and his best-known work Other Days, Other Eyes, based on the Nebula Award-nominated 'Light of Other Days', the story that made his reputation. Although his SF novels and stories were for the most part serious, Shaw was well-known in fannish circles for his sense of humour, and his witty 'Serious Scientific Talks' were a favourite of attendees at Eastercons. Bob Shaw won two Hugos and three BSFA Awards. He died in 1996.
Robert Sheckley

Robert Sheckley (1928-2005) Robert Sheckley was a Hugo- and Nebula-nominated author born and educated in New York. He received an undergraduate degree from New York University in 1951 after a varied career that included time spent as a landscape gardener, a milkman and a stint in the US Army. He published his first story, "Final Examination" for Imagination in May 1952 and quickly gained prominence as a writer, publishing stories for Imagination, Galaxy and other science fiction magazines. His first four books - three collections and a previously serialised novel - were published in the 1950s and his career continued to be successful throughout the following decades. Sheckley served as fiction editor for Omni magazine from January 1980 through September 1981 and was named Author Emeritus by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America in 2001. He passed away at the age of 77 before being able to attend the World SF Convention in Glasgow, where he'd been scheduled Guest of Honour.
Charles Sheffield

Charles Sheffield (1935 - 2002) Charles Sheffield, born in the UK in 1935, graduated from St John's College Cambridge with a Double First in Mathematics and Physics. Moving to the USA in the mid 1960's, he began working in the field of particle physics which lead to a consultancy with NASA and landed him the position of chief scientist at the Earth Satellite Corporation. Best known for writing hard SF, his career as a successful science fiction writer began in response to his grief over the loss of his first wife to cancer in 1977; Sheffield has been awarded both the Hugo and Nebula for his work and won the 1992 John W. Campbell Memorial Award for Best Science Fiction Novel for Brother to Dragons.. He also served as President of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America between 1984 and 1986. For more information see www.sf-encyclopedia.com/entry/sheffield_charles
Mary Shelley

Mary Shelley (1797-1851) was a British novelist, short story writer, dramatist, essayist, biographer, and travel writer, best known for her Gothic novel Frankenstein: or, The Modern Prometheus (1818). She also edited and promoted the works of her husband, the Romantic poet and philosopher Percy Bysshe Shelley. Her father was the political philosopher William Godwin, and her mother was the philosopher and feminist Mary Wollstonecraft.
Lucius Shepard

Lucius Shepard (1947 - 2014)Lucius Shepard was born in the USA in 1947. From the mid-1960s to the early 1980s he lived in various parts of the world and travelled widely. He won the John W. Campbell Award for best new writer in 1985 and also won the World Fantasy Award twice. He died in 2014.
Sharon Shinn

Sharon Shinn is an American novelist whose stories combine aspects of fantasy, science fiction and romance. She has published more than a dozen novels for adult and young readers and her works include the Shifting Circle Series, the Samaria Series, the Twelve Houses Series and a rewriting of Jane Eyre, Jenna Starborn. She works as a journalist in St Louis, Missouri and is a graduate of Northwestern University.
Tom Shippey

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Susan Shwartz

Susan Shwartz received her M.A. and Ph.D. in medieval English from Harvard University. She is the author of several fantasy novels, Grail of Hearts and Shards of Empire as well as two novels with the venerable Andre Norton, Imperial Lady and Empire of the Eagle. She has been nominated for both the World Fantasy and Nebula Awards. She currently resides in New York City.
Robert Silverberg

Robert Silverberg (1935 - )Robert Silverberg has been a professional writer since 1955, widely known for his science fiction and fantasy stories. He is a many-time winner of the Hugo and Nebula awards, was named to the Science Fiction Hall of Fame in 1999, and in 2004 was designated as a Grand Master by the Science Fiction Writers of America. His books and stories have been translated into forty languages. Among his best known titles are Nightwings, Dying Inside, The Book Of Skulls, and the three volumes of the Majipoor Cycle: Lord Valentine's Castle, Majipoor Chronicles and Valentine Pontifex. His collected short stories, covering nearly sixty years of work, are being published in nine volumes by SF Gateway and Subterranean Press. His most recent book is Tales Of Majipoor (2013), a new collection of stories set on the giant world made famous in Lord Valentine's Castle.He and his wife Karen and an assorted population of cats, live in the San Francisco Bay Area in a sprawling house surrounded by exotic plants.
Clifford D. Simak

Clifford D. Simak (1904 -1988)Clifford Donald Simak was born in Wisconsin, in 1904. He attended the University of Wisconsin and spent his working life in the newspaper business. He flirted briefly with science fiction in the early '30s but did not start to write seriously until John W. Campbell's Astounding Stories began to rejuvenate the field in 1937. Simak was a regular contributor to Astounding throughout the Golden Age, producing a body of well regarded work. He won the Nebula and multiple Hugo Awards, and in 1977 was the third writer to be named a Grand Master by SFWA. He died in 1988.
John Sladek

John Sladek (1937 - 2000)John Sladek was born in Iowa in 1937 but moved to the UK in 1966, where he became involved with the British New Wave movement, centred on Michael Moorcock's groundbreaking New Worlds magazine. Sladek began writing SF with 'The Happy Breed', which appeared in Harlan Ellison's seminal anthology Dangerous Visions in 1967, and is now recognized as one of SF's most brilliant satirists. His novels and short story collections include The Muller Fokker Effect, Roderick and Tik Tok, for which he won a BSFA Award. He returned to the United States in 1986, and died there in March 2000.
William Sloane

William Sloane (1906 - 1974)William Milligan Sloane III was born in Plymouth, Massachusetts, in 1906. He was an editor at a number of distinguished houses, including Henry Holt & Company and Funk & Wagnall's, before founding his own publisher, William Sloane Associates, Inc.He resigned from his own company in 1952 and from 1955 until his death, was the director of Rutgers University Press. He was also a playwright and author who wrote two novels of interest to the SF field: To Walk the Night and The Edge of Running Water. He died in New York in 1974.
Cordwainer Smith

Cordwainer Smith (1913 - 1966) Cordwainer Smith was the most famous pen name of US foreign policy adviser Paul Myron Anthony Linebarger. Born in Milwaukee in 1913, his godfather was the Chinese revolutionary and political leader, Sun Yat-sen - the result of his political activist father's close ties with leaders of the Chinese revolution. Smith held a PhD in Political Science from Johns Hopkins, served in the US military during the Second World War and acted as an adviser to President Kennedy. Although he only published one novel, Norstrilia, Smith is well regarded for his short fiction, the majority of which is set in his future history of the Instrumentality of Mankind.
E.E. 'Doc' Smith

E. E. 'Doc' Smith (1890 - 1965) Edward Elmer Smith was born in Wisconsin in 1890. He attended the University of Idaho and graduated with degrees in chemical engineering; he went on to attain a PhD in the same subject, and spent his working life as a food engineer. Smith is best known for the 'Skylark' and 'Lensman' series of novels, which are arguably the earliest examples of what a modern audience would recognise as Space Opera. Early novels in both series were serialised in the dominant pulp magazines of the day: Argosy, Amazing Stories, Wonder Stories and a pre-Campbell Astounding, although his most successful works were published under Campbell's editorship. Although he won no major SF awards, Smith was Guest of Honour at the second World Science Fiction Convention in Chicago, in 1940. He died in 1965.