Bestselling Fiction & Non-Fiction Authors, from The Orion Publising Group
Our Authors
Karl Edward Wagner

Karl Edward Wagner (1945 - 1994)Karl Edward Wagner was born in Knoxville, Tennessee. He earned a degree in history from Kenyon College in 1967 and a degree in psychiatry from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Despite this training, Wagner disliked the medical profession and abandoned it upon establishing himself as a writer; his disillusionment with the medical profession can be seen in the stories 'The Fourth Seal' and 'Into Whose Hands'. As well as being a multi-award winning author, Wagner was a highly successful editor and publisher of horror, science fiction and heroic fantasy, creating a definitive three-volume set of Robert E. Howard's Conan the Barbarian fiction, and edited the long-running and genre-defining Year's Best Horror and Fantasy series. Wagner is perhaps best known for his creation of the long-running series of stories featuring Kane, the Mystic Swordsman. He died in 1994.
Elisabeth Waters

Elisabeth Waters is an American fantasy author
Ian Watson

Ian Watson (1943 - )Ian Watson was born in England in 1943 and graduated from Balliol College, Oxford, with a first class Honours degree in English Literature. He lectured in English in Tanzania (1965-1967) and Tokyo (1967-1970) before beginning to publish SF with "Roof Garden Under Saturn" for the influential New Worlds magazine in 1969. He became a full-time writer in 1976, following the success of his debut novel The Embedding. His work has been frequently shortlisted for the Hugo and Nebula Awards and he has won the BSFA Award twice. From 1990 to 1991 he worked full-time with Stanley Kubrick on story development for the movie A.I. Artificial Intelligence, directed after Kubrick's death by Steven Spielberg; for which he is acknowledged in the credits for Screen Story. Ian Watson lives in Spain.
Lawrence Watt-Evans

Lawrence Watt-Evans (1954- )Lawrence Watt-Evans is the working name of American science fiction and fantasy writer Lawrence Watt Evans. He was born in Arlington, Massachusetts, as the fourth of six children and studied at Bedford High School and Princeton University, although he left the latter without a degree. Watt-Evans began publishing sf in 1975 with "Paranoid Fantasy #1" for American Athiest. He has constructed several scripts for Marvel Comics and has been moderately prolific as a short story writer, with "Why I Left Harry's All-Night Hamburgers" (Asimov's, July 1987) won a 1988 Hugo.
H.G. Wells

H.G. Wells was born in Bromley, Kent in 1866. After working as a draper's apprentice and pupil-teacher, he won a scholarship to the Normal School of Science in 1884, studying under T. H. Huxley. He was awarded a first-class honours degree in biology and resumed teaching but had to retire after a kick from an ill-natured pupil afflicted his kidneys. He worked in poverty in London as a crammer while experimenting in journalism and stories. It was with THE TIME MACHINE (1895) that he had his real breakthrough.
John Whitbourn

John Whitbourn (1958- )John Whitbourn is an archaeology graduate and has been a published author since 1987. His first book, A Dangerous Energy, won the BBC/Victor Gollancz Fantasy Novel Prize in 1991. Whitbourn's novels and short stories tend to focus on alternative histories set in a 'Catholic' universe. Key characteristics of his works are wry humour, the reality of magic and a sustained attempt to reflect on the interaction between religion and politics on a personal and social scale.
Ted White

Ted White (1938 - )Theodore Edwin White is an author, critic, musician and DJ. In addition to books and stories written under his own name, he has also co-authored novels with Dave van Arnam (as Ron Archer) and with Terry Carr (as Norman Edwards). His CV as an editor is impressive: assistant editor for The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction from 1963 - 1968, editor of Amazing Stories and Fantastic from 1969-1978 and editor of Heavy Metal from 1979-1980. A prolific contributor to science fiction fanzines since his teens, he won a Hugo Award in 1968 for Best Fan Writer.
Kate Wilhelm

Kate Wilhelm (1928-2018) Working name of the US writer Katie Gertrude Meridith Wilhelm Knight, born in Ohio in 1928. She started publishing SF in 1956 with 'The Pint-Sized Genie' for Fantastic, and continued for some time with relatively straightforward genre stories; it was not until the late 1960s that she began to release the mature stories which have made her reputation as one of the 20th century's finest SF writers. She was married to noted author and critic Damon Knight and together they have had a profound influence beyond their writing, through the Milford Science Fiction Writers' Conference and its offshoot, in which she was directly involved, the Clarion Science Fiction Writers' Workshop. She won the Hugo Award for Best Novel with Where Late the Sweet Birds Sang, and has won the Nebula Award three times. Kate Wilhelm died in 2018, aged 89.
Elizabeth Willey

Elizabeth Willey was nominated for the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer in 1994 after the 1993 publication of The Well-Favored Man, her first novel. Using her collection of vintage guidebooks, she travels in real and imaginary places.
Sean Williams

Author of seventy published short stories and twenty-nine novels, nominated for the Ditmar, the Aurealis and the prestigious Philip K Dick Award for SATURN RETURNS, Williams has been published around the world in numerous languages, on-line, and in spoken word editions. His current projects include ASTROPOLIS, a gothic-noir gender-bending space opera trilogy, and THE BROKEN LAND, a dark fantasy series for children set in the same fantasy universe as the BOOKS OF THE CHANGE. Concluding volumes in each, THE GRAND CONJUNCTION and THE SCARECROW, are 2009 books. He has also written the novelization of the computer game STAR WARS: THE FORCE UNLEASHED, which debuted at #1 on the New York Times bestseller list. MAGIC DIRT: the Best of Sean Williams was launched in 2008 and won the first Aurealis Award for Best Collection. Sean's science fiction has been likened to that of the "Three Gregs" (Benford, Bear and Egan) while his fantasy has garnered comparisons to Peter Carey, China Miéville and Ursula K. Le Guin. His novel THE CROOKED LETTER was the first fantasy novel in the history of Australian speculative fiction to win both Ditmar and Aurealis Awards. The fourth instalment of the BOOKS OF THE CATACLYSM, THE DEVOURED EARTH, was released in Australia in September, 2006.
Connie Willis

Constance Elaine Trimmer Willis has won, among other accolades, ten HUGO Awards and six NEBULA Awards for her writing, and was recently named an SFWA Grand Master. She lives in Greeley, Colorado with her husband Courtney Willis, a professor of physics at the University of Northern Colorado.
Richard Wilson

Richard Wilson (1920-1987)Richard Wilson was an American science fiction author and director of the News Bureau of Syracuse University until his retirement in 1982; he was instrumental in persuading many sf writers to donate their personal archives to the university's George Arents Research Library, which has been called one of the "most important collection of science fiction manuscripts and papers in the world" (Science/fiction Collections: Fantasy, Supernatural & Weird Tales, 1983). Involved in sf fandom from an early age, he was a founder of the Futurians in the 1930s and published his first sf story, "Murder from Mars", with Astounding Stories in 1940. A number of his short stories were award-winning or award-nominated: "The Eight Billion" was nominated for the Nebula as Best Short Storiy in 1965; "Mother to the World" was nominated for the Hugo for Best Novelette in 1969 and winner of the Nebula in 1968; and "The Story Writer" was nominated for the Nebula Award for Best Novella in 1979. In his later years, Wilson reportedly made it clear to colleagues that he remained too content in his professional life to continue seriously in a writing career.
Gene Wolfe

Gene Wolfe (1931 -) Gene Wolfe was born in New York in 1931 and raised in Texas. After serving in the Korean War he graduated in mechanical engineering from the University of Houston and worked in engineering until becoming an editor of a trade periodical, Plant Engineering, in 1972. Since retiring from this post in 1984, he has written full-time. The author of over three dozen award-wining novels and story collections, he is regarded as one of modern fantasy's most important writers. His best-known work, the four volume far-future Book of the New Sun, won the World Fantasy, BSFA, Nebula, British Fantasy and John W. Campbell memorial Awards. He has won the World Fantasy Award four times for his novels and collections and the World Fantasy Life Achievement Award for his extraordinary body of work. Gene Wolfe lives in Illinois with his wife, Rosemary.
Jack Womack

Jack Womack (1956 - )Jack Womack was born in Kentucky in 1956 but currently lives in New York City. In addition to his writing, he has worked in publicity for a number of major US publishers such as HarperCollins and Orbit. Exploring themes such as urban breakdown, racial tension and class wars, the city of New York plays a large part in the post-Cyberpunk, Near-Future setting of his novels. He won the 1993 Philip K Dick award with Elvissey and has the distinction of being William Gibson's favourite author.
Philip Wylie

Philip Wylie (1902 - 1971)Philip Gordon Wylie was born in Massachusetts in 1902, the son of a Presbyterian minister and the novelist Edna Edwards, who died when he was five. He attended Princeton University and, although he wrote regularly for The Princetonian and had published his first book by the time he left, his academic record was unremarkable. After working for a while at a public relations firm and then for The New Yorker, Wylie eventually took to writing full-time. He is probably best known for his 1933 novel When Worlds Collide, written with Edwin Balmer, which was filmed in 1951 by George Pal's production company. However, his most lasting influence on modern culture is by way of the 1930 novel Gladiator, in which a young man is endowed from the womb with incredible physical abilities, gifted him by the pre-natal intervention of his scientist father. The young protagonist who could jump higher than a house, run faster than a train and bend iron bars in his bare hands was the primary inspiration behind Jerry Siegel and Joe Schuster's Superman.
John Wyndham

John Wyndham (1903-69) John Wyndham Parkes Lucas Beynon Harris was the son of a barrister, who started writing short stories in 1925. During the war he was in the civil service and then the army. In 1946 he went back to writing stories for publication in the USA and decided to try a modified form of science fiction, which he called 'logical fantasy'. As John Wyndham, he is best-known as the author of The Day of the Triffids, but he wrote many other successful novels including The Kraken Wakes, The Chrysalids and The Midwich Cuckoos (filmed as Village of the Damned).
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