Bestselling Fiction & Non-Fiction Authors, from The Orion Publising Group
Our Authors
Robert Bloch

Robert Bloch (1917 - 1994)Robert Albert Bloch was born in Chicago in 1917. Over a career spanning some sixty years he published works in the areas of crime SF and fantasy and, of course, horror. He is best-known as the author of the classic 1958 horror novel, Psycho, famously filmed two years later by Alfred Hitchcock. His career awards include the Hugo, three Bram Stokers and a World Fantasy Life Achievement Award, and in 1991 he was named a World Horror Grandmaster. He worked extensively in television, writing many original screenplays including three for the original series of Star Trek. He died in 1994.
Anthony Boucher

Born William Anthony Parker White in Oakland, California, Anthony Boucher (1911-1968) wrote both mystery and science fiction and was a highly regarded literary critic and editor. He also wrote scripts for radio, spoke numerous languages fluently, and was the first translator into English of Jorge Luis Borges. A founding member of the Mystery Writers of America, he was one of the first winners of an Edgar Award for his mystery reviews in the San Francisco Chronicle. He also wrote short stories for, among others, Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine, Black Mask and Ed McBain's Mystery Book. His iconic status was cemented when, in 1970, Bouchercon (the Anthony Boucher Memorial World Mystery Convention) was set up in his honour.
Pamela Branch

Pamela Branch (1920-1967) was born on a tea estate in Sri Lanka. She was educated in England, studied art in Paris, and attended the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in London. Returning to the East, she lived for three years on a houseboat in Kashmir, and travelled extensively in Europe, India and the Middle East. According to her more famous contemporary Christianna Brand, she was 'the funniest lady you ever knew'; she adored practical jokes, of which she had a seemingly endless store, and the contemporary press lavishly praised her wit. The Sunday Times stated that 'even the bodies manage to be ghoulishly diverting' and the Times Literary Supplement compared her third novel, Murder Every Monday, to the work of Evelyn Waugh. She married twice, was, according to her friends, entertaining, glamorous, beautiful and charming, and the greatest mystery of her work is why it has not received more recognition since her untimely death from cancer at the age of forty-seven.
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