Bestselling Fiction & Non-Fiction Authors, from The Orion Publising Group
Our Authors
Karen Haber

Karen Haber (1955 - )Karen Haber, working name of Karen Lee Haber Silverberg, is both a science fiction and non-fiction author and editor, as well as being an art critic and historian. Beginning her career as a genre writer with "Madre de Dios", published in The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction in 1988, she became more popular with her Fire in Winter sequence. Subsequently, Haber's work has appeared in magazines such as Asimov's Science Fiction and many anthologies. In total she has authored nine books including Star Trek Voyager: Bless the Beasts, and is co-author of Science of the X-Men. Her non-fiction essay Meditations on Middle Earth was nominated for the 2001 Hugo award. She has been married to fellow SF author Robert Silverberg since 1987.
Joe Haldeman

Joe Haldeman was born in Oklahoma in 1943 and studied physics and astronomy before serving as a combat engineer in Vietnam, where he was severely wounded and won a Purple Heart. The Forever War was his first SF novel and it won both the Hugo and Nebula awards, a feat which The Forever Peace repeated. He is also the author of, among others, Mindbridge, All My Sins Remembered, Worlds, Worlds Apart and Worlds Enough and Time.
Jack C Haldeman II

Jack C Haldeman (1941-2002) was an American SF author and elder brother of Joe Haldeman.
Edmond Hamilton

Edmond Hamilton (1904-1977) Born in Youngstown, Ohio, Edmond Hamilton was raised there and in nearby New Castle, Pennsylvania. He was something of a child prodigy, graduating from high school and undertaking his college education at Westminster College at the young age of 14; he dropped out aged 17. A popular science fiction writer in the mid-twentieth century, Hamilton's career began with the publication of his short story 'The Monster God of Mamurth' in the August 1926 issue of Weird Tales. After the war, he wrote for DC Comics, producing stories for Batman, Superman and The Legion of Superheroes. Ultimately, though, he was associated with an extravagant, romantic, high-adventure style of SF, perhaps best represented by his 1947 novel The Star Kings. He was married to fellow SF writer Leigh Brackett from the end of 1946 until his death three decades later.
Frank Hampson

Born in 1918, Frank Hampson always wanted to be a pilot. After serving in the Army during the Second World War, he managed to live his dream as creator and original artist for Dan Dare, first published in the British comic The Eagle in April 1950. Hampson went on to write and illustrate nearly a decade's worth of revolutionary Dan Dare strips. He subsequently worked on a highly regarded strip on the life of Jesus Christ and illustrated a number of children's books for Ladybird. But it was Dan Dare that Hampson was most famous for and he was to receive numerous accolades and awards in recognition of his outstanding contribution to comics. Frank sadly dies on 8 July 1985.
David Harris

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M. John Harrison

M. John Harrison (1945 - ) Michael John Harrison is the author of, amongst others, the Viriconium stories, The Centauri Device, Climbers, The Course of the Heart, Signs of Life, Light and Nova Swing. He has won the Boardman Tasker Award (Climbers), the James Tiptree Jr Award (Light) and the Arthur C. Clarke Award (Nova Swing). He lives in Shropshire.
Harry Harrison

Harry Harrison (1925-2012) Harry Harrison was born Henry Maxwell Dempsey in Connecticut, in 1925. He was the author of a number of much-loved series including the Stainless Steel Rat and Bill the Galactic Hero sequences and the Deathworld Trilogy. He was known as a passionate advocate of Esperanto, the most popular of the constructed international languages, which appears in many of his novels. He published novels for over half a century and was perhaps best known for his seminal novel of overpopulation, Make Room! Make Room!, which was adapted into the cult film Soylent Green.
Travis Heermann

Travis Heermann grew up in the countryside of Nebraska and graduated from University of Nebraska at Lincoln with a BSc in electrical engineering. In 2003, he shifted careers and moved to Japan to teach English to young students in public schools. He has written role-playing and online MMORPG game guides and supplements for Alderac Entertainment Group and later wrote his first novel, The Ivory Star. While living and teaching in Fukuoka, Heermann was inspired to combine the Japanese culture in which he was immersed as well as his passion for fantasy to write Heart Of The Ronin, a tale of a teenage warrior in 13th century Japan.
Robert A. Heinlein

Robert A. Heinlein (1907-1988) was educated at the University of Missouri and the US Naval Academy, Annapolis. He served as a naval officer for five years but retired in 1934 due to ill health. He then studied physics at UCLA before beginning to publish sf with 'Lifeline' for Astounding Science Fiction in 1939. Among his many novels are Stranger in a Strange Land, The Door into Summer, Double Star, Starship Troopers and The Moon is a Harsh Mistress.
Brian Herbert

Brian Herbert is an American SF author and son of the famous author Frank Herbert.
Frank Herbert

Frank Herbert (1920-86) was born in Tacoma, Washington and worked as a reporter and later editor of a number of West Coast newspapers before becoming a full-time writer. His first SF story was published in 1952 but he achieved fame more than ten years later with the publication in Analog of 'Dune World' and 'The Prophet of Dune' that were amalgamated in the novel Dune in 1965.
Vicki Ann Heydron

Vicki Ann Heydron (1945 - )Vicki Ann Heydron was born in Sacramento, California, in 1945. Most of her work is co-written with her husband Randall Garrett (1927 - 1987), including the seven-volume Gandalara Cycle of fantasies. She lives in Washington state.
Peter Higgins

Peter Higgins read English at Oxford University and Queen's, Ontario. He was a Junior Research Fellow at Wolfson College, Oxford and worked in the British Civil Service. His short stories have appeared in Fantasy: Best of the Year 2007, Best New Fantasy 2, Asimov's Science Fiction, Fantasy Magazine, Zahir and Revelation, and in Russian translation in the St Petersburg magazine Esli. His first novel was the acclaimed Wolfhound Century. He lives with his family in South Wales.
Christopher Hinz

Christopher Hinz is the author of four science fiction novels originally published by St. Martins Press. LIEGE-KILLER, which begins the Paratwa Saga, won the Compton Crook Award for best first novel and earned a nomination for the John W. Campbell Award for best new writer. While working to complete his first new novel in years (a contemporary science fiction thriller), Mr. Hinz writes for a newspaper and a public relations firm, and creates and scripts original comic books.
Robert Holdstock

Robert Holdstock (1948 - 2009) Robert Paul Holdstock was born in a remote corner of Kent, sharing his childhood years between the bleak Romney Marsh and the dense woodlands of the Kentish heartlands. He received an MSc in medical zoology and spent several years in the early 1970s in medical research before becoming a full-time writer in 1976. His first published story appeared in the New Worlds magazine in 1968 and for the early part of his career he wrote science fiction. However, it is with fantasy that he is most closely associated. 1984 saw the publication of Mythago Wood, winner of the BSFA and World Fantasy Awards for Best Novel, and widely regarded as one of the key texts of modern fantasy. It and the subsequent 'mythago' novels (including Lavondyss, which won the BSFA Award for Best Novel in 1988) cemented his reputation as the definitive portrayer of the wild wood. His interest in Celtic and Nordic mythology was a consistent theme throughout his fantasy and is most prominently reflected in the acclaimed Merlin Codex trilogy, consisting of Celtika, The Iron Grail and The Broken Kings, published between 2001 and 2007.Among many other works, Holdstock co-wrote Tour of the Universe with Malcolm Edwards, for which rights were sold for a space shuttle simulation ride at the CN Tower in Toronto, and The Emerald Forest, based on John Boorman's film of the same name. His story, 'The Ragthorn', written with friend and fellow author Garry Kilworth, won the World Fantasy Award for Best Novella and the BSFA Award for Short Fiction. Robert Holdstock died in November 2009, just four months after the publication of Avilion, the long-awaited, and sadly final, return to Ryhope Wood. www.robertholdstock.com
Homer

Little is known about the poet Homer but he is thought to have composed the Iliad in the second half of the eight century BC and according to tradition lived on the island of Chios in the east Aegean.
Fred Hoyle

Sir Fred Hoyle (1915-2001) Sir Fred Hoyle was a famous English astronomer noted primarily for the theory of stellar nucleosynthesis and his often controversial stances on other scientific matters-in particular his rejection of the "Big Bang" theory, a term coined by him on BBC radio. He has authored hundreds of technical articles, as well as textbooks, popular accounts of science and two autobiographies. In addition to his work as an astronomer, Hoyle was a writer of science fiction, including a number of books co-written with his son Geoffrey Hoyle. Hoyle spent most of his working life at the Institute of Astronomy at Cambridge and served as its director for a number of years. He was knighted in 1972 and died in Bournemouth, England, after a series of strokes.
Geoffrey Hoyle

Geoffrey Hoyle (1941 - ) Geoffrey Hoyle is the son of astronomer and SF writer, Sir Fred Hoyle, with whom he wrote a number of science fiction novels.
W.H Hudson

W.H. Hudson was born in Argentina in 1841 and he died in London in 1922. His book Far Away and Long Ago is a brilliant evocation of his childhood in Argentina.
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