Bestselling Fiction & Non-Fiction Authors, from The Orion Publising Group
Our Authors
Robert J. Sawyer

Robert J. Sawyer has been described as Canada's answer to Michael Crichton. Critically acclaimed in the US he is regarded as one of SF's most signiifcant writers and his novels are regularly voted as fan's favourites. He lives in Canada.
Elizabeth Scarborough

Elizabeth Ann Scarborough was born March 23, 1947, and lives in the Puget Sound area of Washington. Elizabeth won a Nebula Award in 1989 for her novel The Healer's War, and has written more than a dozen other novels. She has collaborated with Anne McCaffrey, best-known for creating the Dragonriders of Pern, to produce the Petaybee Series and the Acorna Series.
Melissa Scott

Melissa Scott is from Little Rock, Arkansas, and studied history at Harvard College and Brandeis University, where she earned her PhD. in the comparative history program with a dissertation titled "The Victory of the Ancients: Tactics, Technology, and the Use of Classical Precedent." In 1986, she won the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer, and won Lambda Literary Awards in 1995 and 1996 for Shadow Man and Trouble and Her Friends, having previously been a three-time finalist (for Mighty Good Road, Dreamships, and Burning Bright). Trouble and Her Friends was also shortlisted for the Tiptree Award. Her most recent novel, The Jazz, was published by Tor Books in the summer of 2000, and Point of Dreams, a collaboration with long-time co-author Lisa A. Barnett, came out in the fall of that year. Her first work of non-fiction, Conceiving the Heavens: Creating the Science Fiction Novel, was published by Heinemann in 1997. She lives in New Hampshire with her partner of twenty years.
Carol Severance

Carol Severance (1944-2015)Carol Severance was a Hawaii-based writer with a special interest in Pacific Island peoples and their environments. After growing up in Denver, she served with the Peace Corps and later assisted in anthropological fieldwork in the remote coral atolls of Truk, Micronesia. She died in 2015.
Bob Shaw

Bob Shaw (1931 - 1996) Bob Shaw was born in Belfast in 1931. After working in engineering, aircraft design and journalism he became a full time writer in 1975. Among his novels are Orbitsville, A Wreath of Stars, The Ragged Astronauts and his best-known work Other Days, Other Eyes, based on the Nebula Award-nominated 'Light of Other Days', the story that made his reputation. Although his SF novels and stories were for the most part serious, Shaw was well-known in fannish circles for his sense of humour, and his witty 'Serious Scientific Talks' were a favourite of attendees at Eastercons. Bob Shaw won two Hugos and three BSFA Awards. He died in 1996.
Robert Sheckley

Robert Sheckley (1928-2005) Robert Sheckley was a Hugo- and Nebula-nominated author born and educated in New York. He received an undergraduate degree from New York University in 1951 after a varied career that included time spent as a landscape gardener, a milkman and a stint in the US Army. He published his first story, "Final Examination" for Imagination in May 1952 and quickly gained prominence as a writer, publishing stories for Imagination, Galaxy and other science fiction magazines. His first four books - three collections and a previously serialised novel - were published in the 1950s and his career continued to be successful throughout the following decades. Sheckley served as fiction editor for Omni magazine from January 1980 through September 1981 and was named Author Emeritus by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America in 2001. He passed away at the age of 77 before being able to attend the World SF Convention in Glasgow, where he'd been scheduled Guest of Honour.
Charles Sheffield

Charles Sheffield (1935 - 2002) Charles Sheffield, born in the UK in 1935, graduated from St John's College Cambridge with a Double First in Mathematics and Physics. Moving to the USA in the mid 1960's, he began working in the field of particle physics which lead to a consultancy with NASA and landed him the position of chief scientist at the Earth Satellite Corporation. Best known for writing hard SF, his career as a successful science fiction writer began in response to his grief over the loss of his first wife to cancer in 1977; Sheffield has been awarded both the Hugo and Nebula for his work and won the 1992 John W. Campbell Memorial Award for Best Science Fiction Novel for Brother to Dragons.. He also served as President of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America between 1984 and 1986. For more information see www.sf-encyclopedia.com/entry/sheffield_charles
Susan Shwartz

Susan Shwartz received her M.A. and Ph.D. in medieval English from Harvard University. She is the author of several fantasy novels, Grail of Hearts and Shards of Empire as well as two novels with the venerable Andre Norton, Imperial Lady and Empire of the Eagle. She has been nominated for both the World Fantasy and Nebula Awards. She currently resides in New York City.
John Sladek

John Sladek (1937 - 2000)John Sladek was born in Iowa in 1937 but moved to the UK in 1966, where he became involved with the British New Wave movement, centred on Michael Moorcock's groundbreaking New Worlds magazine. Sladek began writing SF with 'The Happy Breed', which appeared in Harlan Ellison's seminal anthology Dangerous Visions in 1967, and is now recognized as one of SF's most brilliant satirists. His novels and short story collections include The Muller Fokker Effect, Roderick and Tik Tok, for which he won a BSFA Award. He returned to the United States in 1986, and died there in March 2000.
Gavin G. Smith

Gavin G. Smith is the Dundee-born author of the hard edged, action-packed SF novels Veteran, War in Heaven, Age of Scorpio, A Quantum Mythology and The Beauty of Destruction, as well as the short story collection Crysis: Escalation. He has collaborated with Stephen Deas as the composite personality Gavin Deas and co-written Elite: Wanted, and the shared world series Empires: Infiltration and Empires: Extraction.
Simon Spurrier

Simon Spurrier was born in 1981. Since 2001 he's become a major writer for the UK's foremost adult comic 2000AD, and in recent years has published multiple projects through U.S. giants such as Marvel (X-Men Legacy, Wolverine), D.C., Avatar Press, Dark Horse and Image. He began his career as a prose writer in 2003 with a novelisation of the videogame Fire Warrior. He subsequently produced work-for-hire genre novels for BL Publishing and Abaddon Press. In late 2007 Spurrier published his first creator-owned novel, Contract, through Hodder Headline. This was followed in 2011 by A Serpent Uncoiled. Spurrier was born in Somewhere-You've-Never-Heard-Of, grew up in the heartlands of Nowhere-Terribly-Interesting, and lives today in North London. He spends much of his time in quiet cafes and pubs, where he exerts an unwanted cosmic magnetism upon any loud or malodorous patrons who should enter.
Bruce Sterling

Bruce Sterling burst onto the SF scene with the birth of Cyberpunk and co-authored THE DIFFERENCE ENGINE with his colleague William Gibson. His biggest UK success was with THE HACKER CRACKDOWN. He lives with his wife and daughters in Austin, Texas.
Brad Strickland

Brad Strickland has written and co-written 41 novels, many of them for younger readers. He is the author of the fantasy trilogy Moon Dreams, Nul's Quest and Wizard's Mole and of the popular horror novel Shadowshow. With his wife Barbara, he has written for the Star Trek Young Adult book series, for Nickelodeon's Are You Afraid of the Dark? book series, and for Sabrina, the Teenage Witch (Pocket Books). Both solo and with Thomas E. Fuller, he has written several books about Wishbone, Public TV's literature-loving dog. When he's not writing, he teaches English at Gainesville College in Gainesville, Georgia. He and Barbara have two children, Amy and Jonathan, and a daughter-in-law, Rebecca. They live and work in Oakwood, Georgia.
Phil Strongman

Phil Strongman was at the 100 Club in 1976 when the Sex Pistols first performed there, was an extra in The Great Rock 'n' Roll Swindle, and has known many of punk's greatest figures for many years. He is a journalist and author.
Theodore Sturgeon

Theodore Sturgeon (1918 - 1985) Theodore Sturgeon was born Edward Hamilton Waldo in New York City in 1918. Sturgeon was not a pseudonym; his name was legally changed after his parents' divorce. After selling his first SF story to Astounding in 1939, he travelled for some years, only returning in earnest in 1946. He produced a great body of acclaimed short fiction (SF's premier short story award is named in his honour) as well as a number of novels, including More Than Human, which was awarded the 1954 retro-Hugo in 2004. In addition to coining Sturgeon's Law - '90% of everything is crud' - he wrote the screenplays for seminal Star Trek episodes 'Shore Leave' and 'Amok Time', inventing the famous Vulcan mating ritual, the pon farr.
Timothy R. Sullivan

Sullivan began writing science fiction in the late 1970s and achieved some early prominence when he was selected to write a series of novels based on the television show, V. He subsequently published four original novels, Destiny's End (1988), The Parasite War (1989), The Martian Viking (1991) and Lords of Creation (1992). Throughout his writing career, Sullivan has regularly published SF short stories in the genre magazines including, most often, Asimov's. He has been a finalist for the Nebula Award. Sullivan conceived and edited two original anthologies Tropical Chills (1988) and Cold Shocks (1991). Sullivan has also written a number of original screenplays for low-budget action movies and acted in several as well.
Tricia Sullivan

Tricia Sullivan is an Arthur C. Clarke Award-winning author of nine science fiction novels. Her work has been translated into eight languages and shortlisted for the Tiptree Award, the John W. Campbell Award, the BSFA Award, and the Locus Award. She is a postgraduate student at the Astrophysics Research Institute in Liverpool.Find out more at www.triciasullivan.com
1