Bestselling Fiction & Non-Fiction Authors, from The Orion Publising Group
Our Authors
R. A. MacAvoy

R. A. MacAvoy (1949 - ) Roberta Ann MacAvoy was born in Ohio in 1949, and has been a full-time writer for almost 30 years. She is a highly acclaimed author of imaginative and original science fiction and fantasy novels. Her debut novel, Tea With The Black Dragon, was shortlisted for the Hugo, Nebula, World Fantasy and Philip K. Dick Awards. The year it was published, 1984, MacAvoy won the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer. Her other works include the Damiano trilogy, The Book Of Kells, Twisting The Rope and the beloved and much-praised Lens Of The World trilogy.
Jodi Ellen Malpas

Jodi was born and raised in the Midlands town of Northampton, England, where she lives with her two boys and a beagle. She is a self-professed daydreamer, a Converse & mojito addict, and has a terrible weak spot for Alpha Males. Writing powerful love stories and creating addictive characters has become her passion - a passion she now shares with her devoted readers. She's now a proud #1 New York Times bestselling author - all six of her published novels having hit the New York Times bestsellers list - as well as a Sunday Times bestseller and international bestseller. Her work is published in over 20 languages across the world.www.jodiellenmalpas.co.ukTwitter: @JodiEllenMalpaswww.goodreads.com/JodiEllenMalpas
Phillip Mann

Phillip Mann (1942 - )Phillip Mann was born in Yorkshire in 1942. he studied English and Drama at Manchester University and later in California. He worked for the New China News Agency in Beijing for two years, but since 1969 has lived principally in New Zealand, where he held the position of Professor of Drama at Victoria University, Wellington, until he retired in 1998. His first novel, The Eye of the Queen was published in 1982 and was followed by seven others including the 'Story of the Gardener' and 'A Land Fit for Heroes' sequences. He has had many plays and stories broadcast on Radio New Zealand, which also adapted his Gardener novels Master of Paxwax and Fall of the Families.
John Marco

John Marco has worked in various industries including aviation, computers and home security. He now writes full time. He lives on Long Island in the USA.
George R.R. Martin

George R.R. Martin published his first story in 1971 and quickly rose to prominence, winning four HUGO and two NEBULA Awards in quick succession before he turned his attention to fantasy with the historical horror novel FEVRE DREAM, now a Fantasy Masterwork. Since then he has won every major award in the fields of fantasy, SF and horror. His magnificent epic saga A Song of Ice and Fire is redefining epic fantasy for a new generation, and is the basis for the hit HBO series GAME OF THRONES. George R.R. Martin lives in New Mexico.Read more at http://sf-encyclopedia.com/entry/martin_george_r_r
Richard Matheson

Richard Matheson (1926-2013)Richard Matheson was born in 1926. He began publishing SF with his short story 'Born of Man and Woman' which appeared in The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction in 1950. I Am Legend was published in 1954 and has been adapted to film three times. Matheson wrote the script for the film The Incredible Shrinking Man, an adaptation of his second SF novel The Shrinking Man (published in 1956). The film won a Hugo award in 1958. He wrote many screenplays (including The Fall of the House of Usher) as well as episodes of The Twilight Zone. He continued to write short stories and novels, some of which formed the basis for film scripts, including Duel, directed by Steven Spielberg in 1971. Further SF short stories were collected in The Shores of Space (1957) and Shock! (1961). His other novels include Hell House (1971) (filmed as The Legend of Hell House in 1973), Bid Time Return (1975), Earthbound (1982) and Journal of the Gun Years (1992). A film of his novel What Dreams May Come (1978) was released in 1998, starring Robin Williams. A collection of his stories from the 1950s and 1960s was released in 1989 as Richard Matheson: Collected Stories. He died in 2013.
Paul McAuley

Paul McAuley (Born 1955)Paul James McAuley was born in Gloucestershire on St George's Day, 1955. He has a Ph.D in Botany and worked as a researcher in biology at various universities, including Oxford and UCLA, and for six years was a lecturer in botany at St Andrews University, before leaving academia to write full time. He started publishing science fiction with the short story "Wagon, Passing" for Asimov's Science Fiction in 1984. His first novel, 400 Billion Stars won the Philip K. Dick Award in 1988, and 1995's Fairyland won the Arthur C. Clarke and John W. Campbell Awards. He has also won the British Fantasy, Sidewise and Theodore Sturgeon Awards. He lives in London.You can find his blog at: http://www.unlikelyworlds.blogspot.com
Ian McDonald

Ian McDonald was born in Manchester in 1960. His family moved to Northern Ireland in 1965. He now lives in Belfast and works in TV production. The author of many previous novels, including the groundbreaking Chaga books set in Africa, Ian McDonald has long been at the cutting edge of SF. RIVER OF GODS won the BSFA award in 2005, BRASYL won in it in 2007 and THE DERVISH HOUSE in 2010.
John Meaney

John Meaney is the author of TO HOLD INFINITY, PARADOX and CONTEXT. TO HOLD INFINITY and PARADOX were on the BSFA shortlists for BEST NOVEL in 1999 and 2001 respectively. THE TIMES called John Meaney 'The first important new sf writer of the 21st century'. Meaney has a degree in physics and computer science, and holds a black belt in Shotokan Karate. He lives in Glamorgan.
Robert A. Metzger

Robert A. Metzger (1956 - ) Robert A. Metzger has spent his entire life in the Los Angeles area, including his stint at UCLA where he received a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering, and his current stint at the Hughes Research Laboratories in Malibu where he grows thin film materials for high speed transistors by a process called Molecular Beam Epitaxy. His short stories have appeared in Aboriginal SF and Weird Tales, and he writes a science column called "What If?" which appears in Aboriginal SF. He lives with no cute pets, has no endearing hobbies, and hates yogurt with a passion that most people reserve for axe-murderers. He reads supermarket tabloids, refuses to wash his car, and has managed to convince several people that lettuce is his favourite food.
Walter M. Miller Jr

Walter M. Miller Jr (1923- 1996)Walter Michael Miller Jr grew up in the American south. He enlisted in the Army Air Corps a month after Pearl Harbor and spent most of the war as a radio operator and gunner, participating in fifty-five combat sorties over Italy and the Balkans, including the assault on Monte Cassino. After the war he studied engineering before turning to writing. A Canticle for Leibowitz won a Hugo Award, and his only other novel, Saint Leibowitz and the Wild Horsewoman was published posthumously.
Walter M. Miller

Walter M. Miller Jr (1923- 1996) grew up in the American south. He enlisted in the Army Air Corps a month after Pearl Harbor and spent most of the war as a radio operator and gunner, participating in fifty-five combat sorties over Italy and the Balkans, including the assault on Monte Cassino. After the war he studied engineering before turning to writing. A Canticle for Leibowitz won a Hugo, and his only other novel, Leibowitz and the Wild Horsewoman was published posthumously.
Donald Moffitt

Donald Moffitt was born in Boston and now lives in rural Maine. A former public relations executive, industrial filmmaker, and ghostwriter, he has been writing fiction on and off for more than twenty years under his own name and an assortment of pen names. His first full-length science-fiction novel and the first book of any genre to be published under his own name was THE JUPITER THEFT (Del Rey, 1977).
Richard Monaco

Richard Monaco has written several fiction and non-fiction books including PARSIVAL OR A KNIGHTS TALE, THE GRAILWAR, THE FINAL QUEST, BIZARRE AMERICA 2 and THE DRACULA SYNDROME. He has also written plays, novellas, screenplays and poetry. Monaco is the director of the Author Development Agency and helped found The Adele Leone Literary Agency. He was also the director of Wildstar Books, the Editor-in-Chief of New York Poetry magazine and taught for The New School for Social Research and Mercy College.
Michael Moorcock

Michael Moorcock (1939-)Michael Moorcock is one of the most important figures in British SF and Fantasy literature. The author of many literary novels and stories in practically every genre, his novels have won and been shortlisted for numerous awards including the Hugo, Nebula, World Fantasy, Whitbread and Guardian Fiction Prize. In 1999, he was given the World Fantasy Life Achievement Award; in 2001, he was inducted into the SF Hall of Fame; and in 2007, he was named a SFWA Grandmaster. Michael Moorcock is also a musician who has performed since the seventies with his own band, the Deep Fix; and, as a member of the prog rock band, Hawkwind, won a gold disc. His tenure as editor of New Worlds magazine in the sixties and seventies is seen as the high watermark of SF editorship in the UK, and was crucial in the development of the SF New Wave. Michael Moorcock's literary creations include Hawkmoon, Corum, Von Bek, Jerry Cornelius and, of course, his most famous character, Elric. He has been compared to, among others, Balzac, Dumas, Dickens, James Joyce, Ian Fleming, J.R.R. Tolkien and Robert E. Howard. Although born in London, he now splits his time between homes in Texas and Paris.
C.L. Moore

C.L. Moore (1911-1987) was born in Indianapolis and became a leading author of science fantasies for WEIRD TALES in the 1930s. After her marriage to fellow SF writer Henry Kuttner in 1940 she concentrated on writing science fiction, usually in collaboration with her husband. She turned to screenwriting after his untimely death; her TV series included MAVERICK and 77 SUNSET STRIP.
N. T. Morley

N.T. Morley is the author of a wide range of erotic fiction titles.
Richard Morris

Richard Morris is emeritus professor of archaeology at the University of Huddersfield. He began his career working on excavations under York Minster in 1971. Since then he has worked as a university teacher, as director of the Council for British Archaeology, as director of the Leeds Institute for Medieval Studies, and as a writer and composer. His book Churches in the Landscape (1989) is widely regarded as a pioneering classic. Time's Anvil: England, Archaeology and the Imagination was longlisted for the Samuel Johnson Prize and shortlisted for the Current Archaeology Book of the Year Award. He is completing a new biography of the aeronautical engineer Barnes Wallis, and working on a social history of interwar England from the air.
James Morrow

James Morrow is a full-time fiction writer and a former independent filmmaker. His previous works include the critically acclaimed novels The Last Witchfinder, This is the Way the World Ends, Only Begotten Daughter, City of Truth, Towing Jehovah and Blameless in Abaddon. Visit his website at www.jamesmorrow.net.
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