Bestselling Fiction & Non-Fiction Authors, from The Orion Publising Group
Our Authors
Bryan Appleyard

Born in 1951, Bryan Appleyard attended King's College, Cambridge. He writes for numerous publications including VANITY FAIR, THE NEW YORK TIMES, THE SPECTATOR and THE SUNDAY TIMES.http://www.bryanappleyard.com/https://twitter.com/BryanAppleyardhttp://www.youtube.com/MrBryanappleyard
Gideon Calder

Gideon Calder is Lecturer in Philosophy at Cardiff University Centre for Lifelong Learning
Daniel C. Dennett

Daniel C. Dennett is Director of the Center of Cognitive Studies, and Distinguished Arts and Sciences Professor at Tufts University, Massachusetts.
Michael Drosnin

Michael Drosnin is a reporter, formerly at the Washington Post and the Wall Street Journal. He is the author of the international bestsellers CITIZEN HUGHES. THE BIBLE CODE and BIBLE CODE II: the Countdown. He lives and works in New York.
A.C. Grayling

A.C. Grayling is Master of the New College of the Humanities, and a Supernumerary Fellow of St Anne's College, Oxford. Until 2011 he was Professor of Philosophy at Birkbeck College, University of London. He is the author of numerous books, and is also a distinguished literary journalist and broadcaster. He has been a columnist for the Guardian and The Times, is a Contributing Editor of Prospect magazine, and Editor of Online Review London. He is a Fellow of both the Royal Society of Literature and the Royal Society of Arts. His website can be visited at www.acgrayling.com.
Ramin Jahanbegloo

RAMIN JAHANBEGLOO Born 1956, Iran. Currently lectures in Political Philosophy and Comparative Politics at the University of Toronto. ISAIAH BERLIN Born 1909, Lithuania. In 1916 he moved with his family to Petrograd. In 1921 his family moved to England. Educated at St Paul¿s School and Corpus Christi College, Oxford. Thereafter he remained at Oxford, where he held Fellowships at All Souls College and New College, and became Chichele Professor of Social and Political Theory (1957¿67) and first President of Wolfson College (1966¿75). He was President of the British Academy from 1974 to 1978. He died in Oxford in November 1997. During the Second World War he was sent by the FO to New York (1941); Washington (1942 ¿ 1946), Moscow (1945¿6. He received many honorary degrees as well as the Erasmus , Lippincott, Jerusalem and Agnelli Prizes.
Christopher Jamison

Abbot Christopher Jamison is the Abbot of the Benedictine Monastery, Worth Abbey, which featured in the BBC documentary series 'The Monastery' (3 million viewers).
Stephen Law

Stephen Law was a school dropout who became a postman in Cambridge, then took a degree in philosophy at Oxford, becoming a Junior Research Fellow at the Queen's College. He now teaches philosophy at Heythrop College, University of London. He has published a number of books including The Philosophy Files, The Outer Limits and The Philosophy Gym.
Wolf Moondance

Previous titles by the author: Rainbow Spirit Journeys and Spirit Medicine.
Chakravarthi Ram-Prasad

Chakravarthi Ram-Prasad studied Politics, Sociology and History in India, and took a doctorate in Philosophy at Oxford. He has taught at the National University of Singapore and held Research Fellowships at Trinity College Oxford and Clare Hall, Cambridge. He has also been Visiting Fellow at Benares Hindu University, Ecole Francaise d' Extreme Orient, Pondicherry and De Nobili College, Pune. He has a range of interests in global and comparative philosophies, and is on the academic advisory council of the Global Religion and Ethics Forum, the Oxford Centre for Hindu Studies and the Templeton Foundation's Global Perspective on Science and Spirituality Programme. He lectures regularly at universities in the USA, Europe and India, and will be a plenary speaker at the 9th East-West Philosophers' Conference in Hawaii in 2005. Ram-Prasad is currently based in the Department of Religious Studies, Lancaster University.
Frederic Raphael

Frederic Raphael was born in Chicago in 1931. He was educated at Charterhouse and St. John¿s College in Cambridge where he was a major scholar in Classics. He has written nineteen novels. His other works include translations, essays and radio plays. He is a regular contributor to The Sunday Times literary and travel pages. He is married with three children. He divides his time between France and England.
Roger Scruton

Roger Scruton was educated at Jesus College, Cambridge and was until 1990 Professor of Aesthetics at Birkbeck College, London.
George Steiner

George Steiner is an Extraordinary Fellow of Churchill College, Cambridge and Professor of English at the University of Geneva.
Peter Watson

Peter Watson was born in 1943 and educated at the universities of Durham, London and Rome. He was deputy editor of New Society and spent four years as part of the 'Insight' team of The Sunday Times. He was New York correspondent of The Times and has written for the Observer, The New York Times, Punch and The Spectator. He is the author of thirteen books and has presented several television programmes about the arts. Since 1998 he has been a Research Associate at the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, at the University of Cambridge.
Richard Webster

Richard Webster studied English Literature at the University of East Anglia. He is the author of Why Freud Was Wrong: Sin, Science and Psychoanalysis (1995) among others. His website: www.richardwebster.net. contains many essays and reviews on Darwin, western science, the hidden authoritarianism of liberalism and on the role played by collective fantasies in history. He lives in Oxford.
Bernard Williams

Bernard Williams is one of the world¿s most eminent philosophers. He is a Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford and is currently Professor of Philosophy at the University of California, Berkeley. A Fellow of the British Academy and an Honorary Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, he is the author of many books, including Morality (1993) and Making Sense of Humanity (1995). From the reviews of Making Sense of Humanity: 'A treat: civilised, sharp discussions of serious issues, spiked with asides which are deep, funny and sometimes both' Onora O'Neill, Times Higher Education Supplement ¿In Making Sense of Humanity, Williams takes his scalpel and sets about slicing morality¿s jugular: free will, blame, moral responsibility, the ability of everyone to do the right thing, and the possibility of a theoretical justification for being good. His attack seems to me to be alarmingly convincing.¿ Spectator
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