Robert A. Heinlein - The Man Who Sold the Moon - Orion Publishing Group

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The Man Who Sold the Moon

By Robert A. Heinlein

  • E-Book
  • £P.O.R.

An SF Gateway eBook: bringing the classics to the future.

D. D. Harriman is a billionaire with a dream: the dream of Space for All Mankind. The method? Anything that works. Maybe, in fact, Harriman goes too far.

But he will give us the stars...

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9780575113107
  • Publication date: 22 Dec 2014
  • Page count:
  • Imprint: Gateway
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A popular and enduring time travel tale by one of science fiction's all-time greatsWhen Dan Davis is crossed in love and stabbed in the back by his business associates, the immediate future doesn't look too bright for him and Pete, his independent-minded tomcat. Suddenly, the lure of suspended animation, the Long Sleep, becomes irresistible and Dan wakes up 30 years later in the 21st century, a time very much to his liking.The discovery that the robot household appliances he invented have been mass produced is no surprise, but the realization that, far from having been stolen from him, they have, mysteriously, been patented in his name is. There's only one thing for it. Dan somehow has to travel back in time to investigate. He may even find Pete ... and the girl he really loves.

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Al Robertson

Al Robertson is the author of Crashing Heaven and Waking Hell, as well as award-nominated SF, fantasy and horror short stories. He's also a poet and occasional musician. When he's not working on his own projects, he helps companies communicate more clearly. He was born in London, brought up in France and is now based in Brighton.You can find out more at his website www.allumination.co.uk. He's also on Twitter as @al_robertson and on Facebook at www.facebook.com/alrobertsonwrites.

Barry N. Malzberg

Barry N. Malzberg (1939-) Barry N. Malzberg is an American writer, editor and agent, whose prolific career has spanned numerous genres - most notably crime and science fiction. Malzberg was particularly active in the science fiction scene of the early seventies, although he became disillusioned with the market forces defining the field, and has rarely published SF works since. His most recent activity in the field has been in the form of advice columns for writers in the quarterly magazine of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. Barry N. Malzberg has been shortlisted for numerous awards, including the Hugo, Nebula and Philip K. Dick.

Bob Shaw

Bob Shaw (1931 - 1996) Bob Shaw was born in Belfast in 1931. After working in engineering, aircraft design and journalism he became a full time writer in 1975. Among his novels are Orbitsville, A Wreath of Stars, The Ragged Astronauts and his best-known work Other Days, Other Eyes, based on the Nebula Award-nominated 'Light of Other Days', the story that made his reputation. Although his SF novels and stories were for the most part serious, Shaw was well-known in fannish circles for his sense of humour, and his witty 'Serious Scientific Talks' were a favourite of attendees at Eastercons. Bob Shaw won two Hugos and three BSFA Awards. He died in 1996.

Cecelia Holland

Cecelia Holland was born in 1943 and is a well-known and acclaimed writer of historical fiction. Floating Worlds is her only SF novel.

Dan Simmons

Dan Simmons won the World Fantasy Award for his first novel, SONG OF KALI, inspired by his travels in India. In the 1990s he rewrote the SF rulebook with his Hyperion Cantos quartet. He has also written thrillers. Alongside his writing he maintains a career as a college lecturer in English Literature in the USA.

E.E. 'Doc' Smith

E. E. 'Doc' Smith (1890 - 1965) Edward Elmer Smith was born in Wisconsin in 1890. He attended the University of Idaho and graduated with degrees in chemical engineering; he went on to attain a PhD in the same subject, and spent his working life as a food engineer. Smith is best known for the 'Skylark' and 'Lensman' series of novels, which are arguably the earliest examples of what a modern audience would recognise as Space Opera. Early novels in both series were serialised in the dominant pulp magazines of the day: Argosy, Amazing Stories, Wonder Stories and a pre-Campbell Astounding, although his most successful works were published under Campbell's editorship. Although he won no major SF awards, Smith was Guest of Honour at the second World Science Fiction Convention in Chicago, in 1940. He died in 1965.

Frank Herbert

Frank Herbert (1920-86) was born in Tacoma, Washington and worked as a reporter and later editor of a number of West Coast newspapers before becoming a full-time writer. His first SF story was published in 1952 but he achieved fame more than ten years later with the publication in Analog of 'Dune World' and 'The Prophet of Dune' that were amalgamated in the novel Dune in 1965.

Fredric Brown

Fredric Brown (1906-1972) was an American SF writer and Edgar Award-winning crime writer. Although the author of a number of SF and detective novels, he remains most famous for his prolific short story writing.

Garry Kilworth

Garry Kilworth (1941 -) Garry Douglas Kilworth was born in York in 1941 and travelled widely as a child, his father being a serviceman. After seventeen years in the RAF and eight working for Cable and Wireless, he attended King's College, London University, where he obtained an honours degree in English. Garry Kilworth has published novels under a number of pseudonyms in the fields of Science Fiction, Fantasy, Historical Fiction and Children's Fiction, winning the British and World Fantasy Awards and being twice shortlisted for the prestigious Carnegie Award for Children's Literature.

Gordon R Dickson

Gordon R. Dickson (1923 - 2001) Gordon Rupert Dickson was born in Alberta, Canada, in 1923 but resided in the United States from the age of thirteen. Along with Robert A. Heinlein, he is regarded as one of the fathers of military space opera, his Dorsai! sequence being an early exemplar of both military SF and Future History. Dickson was one of the rare breed of authors as well known for his fantasy as his SF - The Dragon and the George, the first novel in his Dragon Knight sequence, was shortlisted for the World Fantasy Award and won the British Fantasy Award. Dickson's work also won him three Hugos and Nebula. He died in 2001.

J. T. McIntosh

J T McIntosh (1925 - 2008)J. T. McIntosh was the pseudonym used by Scottish writer and journalist James Murdoch MacGregor, under which all of his SF writing appeared (with the exception of a single story). Born in Paisley, Scotland, in 1925, he began publishing science fiction in 1950 with 'The Curfew Tolls', which appeared in John W. Campbell's Astounding Science Fiction magazine. His first novel, World Out of Mind, appeared three years later, and he continued to write novels of interest over the next decade and a half, but ceased publishing work after 1980. He died in 2008.