C.L. Moore - C.L. Moore SF Gateway Omnibus - Orion Publishing Group

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    • ISBN:9781473201743
    • Publication date:16 Jan 2014

C.L. Moore SF Gateway Omnibus

Jirel of Joiry, Northwest of Earth, Judgment Night

By C.L. Moore

  • Paperback
  • £18.99

From the ground-breaking digital initiative, the SF Gateway, three acclaimed novels from the award-winning C. L. Moore. A perfect introduction to one of the greats of classic SF.

From the SF Gateway, the most comprehensive digital library of classic SFF titles ever assembled, comes an ideal sample introduction to the fantastic work of C. L. Moore.

One of the first women to rise to prominence in the male-dominated world of pulp science fiction, Moore was a mainstay of SF in the middle of the last century, both as a solo writer and in collaboration with her husband, Henry Kuttner. This omnibus shows her mastery of both Sword and Sorcery and planetary romance, reprinting JIREL OF JOIRY, NORTHWEST OF EARTH, and story collection JUDGEMENT NIGHT.

Biographical Notes

Catherine Lucille Moore was born in Indianapolis in 1911. Prolonged illness when young meant she spent much of her time as a child reading the fantastic tales of the day, a background which no doubt spurred her on to become a writer of science fiction and fantasy herself. Moore made her first professional sale to WEIRD TALES while still in her early 20s: the planetary romance SHAMBLEAU, which introduced one of her best-known heroes, Northwest Smith. She went on to produce a highly respected body of work, initially solo for WEIRD TALES and then, in collaboration with her husband, fellow SF writer Henry Kuttner, whom she married in 1940, for John W. Campbell's ASTOUNDING SCIENCE FICTION. Moore was one of the first women to rise to prominence in the male-dominated world of early SF, and paved the way for others to follow in her footsteps. Moore ceased to write fiction after Kuttner's death in 1958, concentrating instead on writing for television. She died in April 1987 after a long battle with Alzheimer's Disease.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9780575119321
  • Publication date: 16 Jan 2014
  • Page count: 672
  • Imprint: Gateway
Gateway

Jirel of Joiry

C.L. Moore
Authors:
C.L. Moore
Gateway

Earth's Last Citadel

Henry Kuttner, C.L. Moore
Authors:
Henry Kuttner, C.L. Moore

Torn from the Twentieth Century by the super-science of a master being from an alien galaxy, four adventurers find themselves at Carcasilla, EARTH'S LAST CITADEL, a billion years from now. It is there that the mutated remains of humanity are making their final stand.

Gateway

Beyond Earth's Gates

C.L. Moore
Authors:
C.L. Moore

Under Eddie Burton's management the ambitious starlet Lorna Maxwell seemed headed for the top of Broadway's glamorous world of make-believe. And then she vanished - through a wall where there was no door. Eddie found himself plunging after her into a city beyond reality. In that weird twin city to New York, Eddie became a hunted fugitive while his girl friend turned up as an ever-present face and all-pervading voice that awed and mystified the inhabitants. And Eddie learned that between him and return to his natural home stood her new manager, a mysterious figure who ruled by a tyrannical combination of super-scientific miracle and brute force.

Gateway

Judgement Night: A Selection of Science Fiction

C.L. Moore
Authors:
C.L. Moore

Released in 1952, Judgment Night collects five Moore novellas from the pages of editor John W. Campbell, Jr.'s Astounding Science Fiction magazine:''Judgment Night'' (first published in August and September, 1943) balances a lush rendering of a future galactic empire with a sober meditation on the nature of power and its inevitable loss; ''The Code'' (July, 1945) pays homage to the classic Faust with modern theories and Lovecraftian dread; ''Promised Land'' (February, 1950) and ''Heir Apparent'' (July, 1950) both document the grim twisting that mankind must undergo in order to spread into the solar system; ''Paradise Street'' (September, 1950) shows a futuristic take on the old western conflict between lone hunter and wilderness-taming settlers.Chosen by the author herself as the best of her longer-form writing, these stories show a gifted wordsmith working at the height of her talents.

Gateway

Northwest of Earth

C.L. Moore
Authors:
C.L. Moore
Gateway

No Boundaries

C.L. Moore, Henry Kuttner
Authors:
C.L. Moore, Henry Kuttner

Here is an anthology that explores the furthest reaches of imagination and the closest areas of emotion with power and with humour and with a sense of human purpose. This is Kuttner and Moore at their best.

Gateway

Doomsday Morning

C.L. Moore
Authors:
C.L. Moore

Comus, the communications network/police force, has spread its web of power all across an America paralyzed by the after-effects of limited nuclear war. But in California, resistance is building against the dictatorship of Comus and Andrew Raleigh, president for life. For now Raleigh is dying and the powers of Comus are fading. It's the perfect time for the Californian revolutionaries to activate the secret weapon that alone can destroy America's totalitarian system and re-establish democracy.Yet Comus too has powers at its disposal, chief among them Howard Rohan. A washed-up actor until Comus offers him a second chance, Rohan will head a troupe of players touring in the heart of rebel territory.Howard Rohan, double agent, caught between the orders of Comus and rebels demands. Which side will he choose? Who will he play false - himself, or the entire country?

Al Robertson

Al Robertson is the author of Crashing Heaven and Waking Hell, as well as award-nominated SF, fantasy and horror short stories. He's also a poet and occasional musician. When he's not working on his own projects, he helps companies communicate more clearly. He was born in London, brought up in France and is now based in Brighton.You can find out more at his website www.allumination.co.uk. He's also on Twitter as @al_robertson and on Facebook at www.facebook.com/alrobertsonwrites.

Barry N. Malzberg

Barry N. Malzberg (1939-) Barry N. Malzberg is an American writer, editor and agent, whose prolific career has spanned numerous genres - most notably crime and science fiction. Malzberg was particularly active in the science fiction scene of the early seventies, although he became disillusioned with the market forces defining the field, and has rarely published SF works since. His most recent activity in the field has been in the form of advice columns for writers in the quarterly magazine of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. Barry N. Malzberg has been shortlisted for numerous awards, including the Hugo, Nebula and Philip K. Dick.

Bob Shaw

Bob Shaw (1931 - 1996) Bob Shaw was born in Belfast in 1931. After working in engineering, aircraft design and journalism he became a full time writer in 1975. Among his novels are Orbitsville, A Wreath of Stars, The Ragged Astronauts and his best-known work Other Days, Other Eyes, based on the Nebula Award-nominated 'Light of Other Days', the story that made his reputation. Although his SF novels and stories were for the most part serious, Shaw was well-known in fannish circles for his sense of humour, and his witty 'Serious Scientific Talks' were a favourite of attendees at Eastercons. Bob Shaw won two Hugos and three BSFA Awards. He died in 1996.

Cecelia Holland

Cecelia Holland was born in 1943 and is a well-known and acclaimed writer of historical fiction. Floating Worlds is her only SF novel.

Dan Simmons

Dan Simmons won the World Fantasy Award for his first novel, SONG OF KALI, inspired by his travels in India. In the 1990s he rewrote the SF rulebook with his Hyperion Cantos quartet. He has also written thrillers. Alongside his writing he maintains a career as a college lecturer in English Literature in the USA.

Frank Herbert

Frank Herbert (1920-86) was born in Tacoma, Washington and worked as a reporter and later editor of a number of West Coast newspapers before becoming a full-time writer. His first SF story was published in 1952 but he achieved fame more than ten years later with the publication in Analog of 'Dune World' and 'The Prophet of Dune' that were amalgamated in the novel Dune in 1965.

Fredric Brown

Fredric Brown (1906-1972) was an American SF writer and Edgar Award-winning crime writer. Although the author of a number of SF and detective novels, he remains most famous for his prolific short story writing.

Garry Kilworth

Garry Kilworth (1941 -) Garry Douglas Kilworth was born in York in 1941 and travelled widely as a child, his father being a serviceman. After seventeen years in the RAF and eight working for Cable and Wireless, he attended King's College, London University, where he obtained an honours degree in English. Garry Kilworth has published novels under a number of pseudonyms in the fields of Science Fiction, Fantasy, Historical Fiction and Children's Fiction, winning the British and World Fantasy Awards and being twice shortlisted for the prestigious Carnegie Award for Children's Literature.

Gordon R Dickson

Gordon R. Dickson (1923 - 2001) Gordon Rupert Dickson was born in Alberta, Canada, in 1923 but resided in the United States from the age of thirteen. Along with Robert A. Heinlein, he is regarded as one of the fathers of military space opera, his Dorsai! sequence being an early exemplar of both military SF and Future History. Dickson was one of the rare breed of authors as well known for his fantasy as his SF - The Dragon and the George, the first novel in his Dragon Knight sequence, was shortlisted for the World Fantasy Award and won the British Fantasy Award. Dickson's work also won him three Hugos and Nebula. He died in 2001.

J. T. McIntosh

J T McIntosh (1925 - 2008)J. T. McIntosh was the pseudonym used by Scottish writer and journalist James Murdoch MacGregor, under which all of his SF writing appeared (with the exception of a single story). Born in Paisley, Scotland, in 1925, he began publishing science fiction in 1950 with 'The Curfew Tolls', which appeared in John W. Campbell's Astounding Science Fiction magazine. His first novel, World Out of Mind, appeared three years later, and he continued to write novels of interest over the next decade and a half, but ceased publishing work after 1980. He died in 2008.

Jack Finney

Born in 1911 the American author Jack Finney wrote numerous SF novels, thrillers and mysteries, several of which were adapted to film. He is best known as the author of The Body Snatchers, which became the hugely popular and influential film, The Invasion of the Bodysnatchers. He was awarded the World Fantasy Award for Lifetime Achievement in 1987. A long time resident of Californa he died in 1995.

Jack L. Chalker

Jack L. Chalker (1944 - 2005)Jack Laurence Chalker was born in Baltimore, in 1944. He received an MLA from Johns Hopkins University and taught history and geography for over a decade before becoming a professional writer in 1978. He was active in the fan community from his teens and though he published work as an editor and critic, it is for his fiction that he is best known. He was a prolific author, writing across genres successfully, and was nominated for the Hugo and John W. Campbell New Writer awards, among others. His major work is The Well of Souls sequence, comprising ten books across two series, and featuring the 'godgame' narrative device that was his signature. He died in February, 2005.

Jack Womack

Jack Womack (1956 - )Jack Womack was born in Kentucky in 1956 but currently lives in New York City. In addition to his writing, he has worked in publicity for a number of major US publishers such as HarperCollins and Orbit. Exploring themes such as urban breakdown, racial tension and class wars, the city of New York plays a large part in the post-Cyberpunk, Near-Future setting of his novels. He won the 1993 Philip K Dick award with Elvissey and has the distinction of being William Gibson's favourite author.