Marta Randall - Journey - Orion Publishing Group

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Journey

By Marta Randall

  • E-Book
  • £P.O.R.

A new empire rises out of the enigmatic cosmic planet of Aerie, while in the shadows, Jason and Mish Kennerin's destroyed world leaves them with only their love and the uncertain future of this new planet. As Jason and Mish find their sphere of love in the midst of an evolution, Aerie promises to shelter them. But it does more than that, for in time, a dynasty starts to emerge from the chaos of their ruined past.

Biographical Notes

Marta Randall is the author of seven novels and numerous shorter works. She also edited NEW DIMENSIONS 11 and 12 and NEBULA STORIES 19. She has taught writing in a number of venues, including the Clarion workshop and through the University of California at the Berkeley extension. Currently she teaches private workshops. She was born in Mexico City, Mexico in 1948 and lives in Sonoma County, California, with her husband and youngest child. Her most recent book was GROWING LIGHT, written under the name Martha Conley.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9780575125544
  • Publication date: 18 Jun 2012
  • Page count:
  • Imprint: Gateway
Gateway

Islands

Marta Randall
Authors:
Marta Randall
Gateway

Dangerous Games

Marta Randall
Authors:
Marta Randall

This sequel to JOURNEY blends science fiction and family saga to create a complicated and vibrant world, the people who cherish it, those who want to conquer it and those who bring it to the edge of ruin. The Kennerins pursue their desires and hatreds from the reaches of deep space to the smallest islands on Aerie, in a series of dangerous games whose stakes include the world and space and tauspace, beyond the reach of time.

Adam Roberts

Adam Roberts is commonly described as one of the UK's most important writers of SF. He is the author of numerous novels and literary parodies. He is Professor of 19th Century Literature at Royal Holloway, London University and has written a number of critical works on both SF and 19th Century poetry. He is a contributor to the SF ENCYCLOPEDIA.

Adrian Cole

Adrian Cole was born in Plymouth, Devonshire in 1949. Recently the Director of College Resources in a large secondary school in Bideford, he makes his home there with his wife Judy, son Sam, and daughter Katia. The books of the DREAM LORDS trilogy (Zebra books 1975-1976) were his first books published. Cole has had numerous short stories published in genres ranging from science fiction and fantasy through horror. His works also have been translated into many languages including German, Dutch, Belgian, and Italian. Apart from the STAR REQUIEME and OMARAN SAGA quartets being reprinted by e-reads, some of his most recent works include the VOIDAL TRILOGY (Wildside Press) and STORM OVER ATLANTIS (Cosmos Press).

Alastair Reynolds

Alastair Reynolds was born in Barry, South Wales, in 1966. He studied at Newcastle and St Andrews Universities and has a Ph.D. in astronomy. He stopped working as an astrophysicist for the European Space Agency to become a full-time writer. REVELATION SPACE and PUSHING ICE were shortlisted for the ARTHUR C. CLARKE AWARD; REVELATION SPACE, ABSOLUTION GAP, DIAMOND DOGS and CENTURY RAIN were shortlisted for the BRITISH SCIENCE FICTION AWARD and CHASM CITY won the BRITISH SCIENCE FICTION AWARD.You can learn more by visiting www.alastairreynolds.com, or by following @AquilaRift on twitter.

Alex Lamb

Alexander Lamb splits his time between writing science fiction, software engineering, teaching improvised theater, running business communication skills workshops, and conducting complex systems research.He is currently working on mobile applications for the publishing industry, and also on the large-scale simulation of battlefields for the US Department of Defense, for the purposes of enabling the evacuation of soldiers by robot. He currently lives in Santa Cruz, CA with his wife, Genevieve Graves, an astrophysicist also at the university there, and their three month old son.

Anna Sheehan

Anna Sheehan has been a dedicated writer since her first year in high school, when her novella won second place in a local competition, losing only to a (now) professional mystery writer. Her first novel was published serially in a local newsletter when she was 16. She is a regular attendee of the Pacific Northwest Writers Association conference, who first invited her to attend their meeting with a scholarship. Anna lives on an isolated mountain ranch in central Oregon.

Arkady Strugatsky

Arkady Strugatsky (1925-1991) and Boris Strugatsky (1931-2012) Arkady and Boris Strugatsky began to collaborate in the early 1950s after Arkady had studied English and Japanese and worked as a technical translator and editor, and Boris was a computer mathematician at Pulkova astronomical observatory. The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction describes them as 'the best Soviet SF writers' and works such as Hard to be a God, Definitely Maybe, The Snail on the Slope and Monday Begins on Saturday are powerful and poignant novels that continue to amaze and move readers. Andrei Tarkovsky's much admired film, Stalker, was based on their most famous work, Roadside Picnic.Read more at http://sf-encyclopedia.com/entry/strugatski_arkady

Bernard Wolfe

Bernard Wolfe (1915-1985) was born in New Haven, Connecticut. He worked as a military correspondent for a number of science magazines during the Second World War, and began to write fiction in 1946. He became best known for his 1952 SF novel Limbo.

Boris Strugatsky

Arkady Strugatsky (1925-1991) and Boris Strugatsky (1931-2012) Arkady and Boris Strugatsky began to collaborate in the early 1950s after Arkady had studied English and Japanese and worked as a technical translator and editor, and Boris was a computer mathematician at Pulkova astronomical observatory. The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction describes them as 'the best Soviet SF writers' and works such as Hard to be a God, Definitely Maybe, The Snail on the Slope and Monday Begins on Saturday are powerful and poignant novels that continue to amaze and move readers. Andrei Tarkovsky's much admired film, Stalker, was based on their most famous work, Roadside Picnic.

Bruce Sterling

Bruce Sterling burst onto the SF scene with the birth of Cyberpunk and co-authored THE DIFFERENCE ENGINE with his colleague William Gibson. His biggest UK success was with THE HACKER CRACKDOWN. He lives with his wife and daughters in Austin, Texas.

Cordwainer Smith

Cordwainer Smith (1913 - 1966) Cordwainer Smith was the most famous pen name of US foreign policy adviser Paul Myron Anthony Linebarger. Born in Milwaukee in 1913, his godfather was the Chinese revolutionary and political leader, Sun Yat-sen - the result of his political activist father's close ties with leaders of the Chinese revolution. Smith held a PhD in Political Science from Johns Hopkins, served in the US military during the Second World War and acted as an adviser to President Kennedy. Although he only published one novel, Norstrilia, Smith is well regarded for his short fiction, the majority of which is set in his future history of the Instrumentality of Mankind.

Dan Simmons

Dan Simmons won the World Fantasy Award for his first novel, SONG OF KALI, inspired by his travels in India. In the 1990s he rewrote the SF rulebook with his Hyperion Cantos quartet. He has also written thrillers. Alongside his writing he maintains a career as a college lecturer in English Literature in the USA.

David Timson

David Timson has recorded numerous audiobooks and poetry compilations and has recording the complete Sherlock Holmes stories for Naxos. He wrote The History of the Theatre, which won an award for most original production from the Spoken Word Publishers Association in 2001. His production of Richard III won Best Drama Award from the SWPA in 2001 and in 2002 he won the Audio of the Year Award for his reading of A Study in Scarlet.

Dmitry Glukhovsky

Dmitry Glukhovsky is a Journalism and Foreign Relations graduate of the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. Actually he is Russia Today`s roving reporter. From Algeria to Iceland, from Luxembourg to Kazakhstan, Glukhovsky has kept Russia Today viewers abreast of both breaking news and the results of major international gatherings. As correspondent he also took part in the Russian Polar expedition. In 2007, Glukhovsky got the Encouragement Award of the European Science Fiction Society in the prestigeous EuroCon contest in Copenhagen for his novel "Metro-2033". Apart from his native Russian, he speaks English, French, German, Hebrew and Spanish. His Metro novels have been international bestsellers and are the basis of the bestselling Metro computer game franchise.

Donald Suddaby

Donald Suddaby (1900-1964)Donald Suddaby, born in Leeds, was a British author and prolific writer of children's books. His first work was Scarlet-Dragon: A Little Chinese Phantasy, published in 1923. Suddaby began publishing works of genre interest under the name of Alan Griff with stories like "The Emerald" in August 1930 and "The Coming of Glugm" in September 1930, both for Colour. His first sf novel was Lost Men in the Grass (1940), also as by Griff. He died in 1964.

Douglas Adams

Douglas Adams came to world-wide prominence with the BBC Radio series The Hitch Hiker¿s Guide to the Galaxy, which subsequently became the bestselling novel, a television series, a stage play, a computer game, audio cassettes, CD-roms and a towel, and was followed by the last two books in the original trilogy, The Restaurant at the End of the Universe and Life, The Universe and Everything, then a number of other fiction and non-fiction books. Douglas Adams died in 2001.

E.C. Tubb

Edwin Charles Tubb was born in London in 1919, and was a prolific author of SF, fantasy and western novels, under his own name and a number of pseudonyms. He wrote hundreds of short stories and novellas for the SF magazines of the 50's, including the long-running Galaxy Science Fiction, and was a founding member of the British Science Fiction Association. He died in 2010.

Edmond Hamilton

Edmond Hamilton (1904-1977) Born in Youngstown, Ohio, Edmond Hamilton was raised there and in nearby New Castle, Pennsylvania. He was something of a child prodigy, graduating from high school and undertaking his college education at Westminster College at the young age of 14; he dropped out aged 17. A popular science fiction writer in the mid-twentieth century, Hamilton's career began with the publication of his short story 'The Monster God of Mamurth' in the August 1926 issue of Weird Tales. After the war, he wrote for DC Comics, producing stories for Batman, Superman and The Legion of Superheroes. Ultimately, though, he was associated with an extravagant, romantic, high-adventure style of SF, perhaps best represented by his 1947 novel The Star Kings. He was married to fellow SF writer Leigh Brackett from the end of 1946 until his death three decades later.

Eric Frank Russell

Eric Frank Russell (1905-1978) was the first British writer to contribute regularly to Astounding Science Fiction, his first story, 'The Saga of Pelican West', appearing in that magazine in 1937. His novels include Sinister Barrier, Wasp and The Great Explosion and his short fiction has appeared in a number of collections.