Pat Murphy - The City, Not Long After - Orion Publishing Group

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The City, Not Long After

By Pat Murphy

  • E-Book
  • £P.O.R.

"We don't have to kill Fourstar's soldiers. All we have to do is change their minds... Let's think of this war as an art project"

The city - home of pale ghosts and chattering monkeys - where Danny-boy the artist, and the nameless young woman, who carries a warning from the countryside, must lead the small band of survivors. Lead them into a bloodless battle in a world with little enough blood left to spill...

Biographical Notes

Pat Murphy (1955 - )
Patrice Ann Murphy was born in Washington in 1955, and is an award-winning American science writer and author of science fiction and fantasy. Her second novel, The Falling Woman (1986), won the Nebula Award, and she also won a Nebula Award in the same year for her novelette, 'Rachel in Love.' Her short story collection, Points of Departure (1990) won the Philip K. Dick Award, and her 1990 novella, 'Bones', won the World Fantasy Award in 1991. She lives in San Francisco.

For more information see www.sf-encyclopedia.com/entry/murphy_pat

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9780575133501
  • Publication date: 02 Oct 2013
  • Page count:
  • Imprint: Gateway
Gollancz

The Falling Woman

Pat Murphy
Authors:
Pat Murphy

Elizabeth Waters, an archeologist who abandoned her husband and daughter years ago to pursue her career, can see the shadows of the past. It's a gift she keeps secret from her colleagues and students, one that often leads her to incredible archeological discoveries - and the terrible suspicion that she might be going mad. Then on a dig in the Yucatan, the shadow of a Mayan priestess speaks to her. Suddenly Elizabeth's daughter Diane arrives, hoping to reconnect with her mother. As Elizabeth, her daughter and the priestess fall into the mysterious world of Mayan magic, it is clear one of them will be asked to make the ultimate sacrifice ...

Gateway

Adventures in Time and Space with Max Merriwell

Pat Murphy
Authors:
Pat Murphy
Gateway

Wild Angel by Mary Merriwell: by Max Merriwell

Pat Murphy
Authors:
Pat Murphy

When Sarah McKensie's parents are murdered, the young girl is saved by a mother wolf and raised in the pack. Part Mowgli, part Tarzan of the Apes, Sarah becomes the Wild Angel of the Sierras, rescuing those in need, while eluding her parents' killer, a man who still wants to see her dead.An amazing young savage, Sarah lives with the wolves, hunts with the wolves, fights for dominance in the pack. She watches people from a distance, but she does not think of herself as one of them. She belongs to the pack. How can such a child be reclaimed for civilization?Sarah's struggle for survival brings together a fascinating assortment of characters: Max Phillips, who found her parents' bodies and never gave up the search for the missing child; Audrey North, Sarah's aunt, who wants nothing more than to find her niece; and, ultimately, a young Temperance missionary, Professor Serunca's travelling circus, and a mysterious itinerant fortune-teller named Gitana.

Gateway

Nadya

Pat Murphy
Authors:
Pat Murphy
Gateway

Points of Departure

Pat Murphy
Authors:
Pat Murphy
Gateway

The Shadow Hunter

Pat Murphy
Authors:
Pat Murphy

Al Robertson

Al Robertson is the author of Crashing Heaven and Waking Hell, as well as award-nominated SF, fantasy and horror short stories. He's also a poet and occasional musician. When he's not working on his own projects, he helps companies communicate more clearly. He was born in London, brought up in France and is now based in Brighton.You can find out more at his website www.allumination.co.uk. He's also on Twitter as @al_robertson and on Facebook at www.facebook.com/alrobertsonwrites.

Barry N. Malzberg

Barry N. Malzberg (1939-) Barry N. Malzberg is an American writer, editor and agent, whose prolific career has spanned numerous genres - most notably crime and science fiction. Malzberg was particularly active in the science fiction scene of the early seventies, although he became disillusioned with the market forces defining the field, and has rarely published SF works since. His most recent activity in the field has been in the form of advice columns for writers in the quarterly magazine of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. Barry N. Malzberg has been shortlisted for numerous awards, including the Hugo, Nebula and Philip K. Dick.

Bob Shaw

Bob Shaw (1931 - 1996) Bob Shaw was born in Belfast in 1931. After working in engineering, aircraft design and journalism he became a full time writer in 1975. Among his novels are Orbitsville, A Wreath of Stars, The Ragged Astronauts and his best-known work Other Days, Other Eyes, based on the Nebula Award-nominated 'Light of Other Days', the story that made his reputation. Although his SF novels and stories were for the most part serious, Shaw was well-known in fannish circles for his sense of humour, and his witty 'Serious Scientific Talks' were a favourite of attendees at Eastercons. Bob Shaw won two Hugos and three BSFA Awards. He died in 1996.

Cecelia Holland

Cecelia Holland was born in 1943 and is a well-known and acclaimed writer of historical fiction. Floating Worlds is her only SF novel.

Dan Simmons

Dan Simmons won the World Fantasy Award for his first novel, SONG OF KALI, inspired by his travels in India. In the 1990s he rewrote the SF rulebook with his Hyperion Cantos quartet. He has also written thrillers. Alongside his writing he maintains a career as a college lecturer in English Literature in the USA.

E.E. 'Doc' Smith

E. E. 'Doc' Smith (1890 - 1965) Edward Elmer Smith was born in Wisconsin in 1890. He attended the University of Idaho and graduated with degrees in chemical engineering; he went on to attain a PhD in the same subject, and spent his working life as a food engineer. Smith is best known for the 'Skylark' and 'Lensman' series of novels, which are arguably the earliest examples of what a modern audience would recognise as Space Opera. Early novels in both series were serialised in the dominant pulp magazines of the day: Argosy, Amazing Stories, Wonder Stories and a pre-Campbell Astounding, although his most successful works were published under Campbell's editorship. Although he won no major SF awards, Smith was Guest of Honour at the second World Science Fiction Convention in Chicago, in 1940. He died in 1965.

Frank Herbert

Frank Herbert (1920-86) was born in Tacoma, Washington and worked as a reporter and later editor of a number of West Coast newspapers before becoming a full-time writer. His first SF story was published in 1952 but he achieved fame more than ten years later with the publication in Analog of 'Dune World' and 'The Prophet of Dune' that were amalgamated in the novel Dune in 1965.

Fredric Brown

Fredric Brown (1906-1972) was an American SF writer and Edgar Award-winning crime writer. Although the author of a number of SF and detective novels, he remains most famous for his prolific short story writing.

Garry Kilworth

Garry Kilworth (1941 -) Garry Douglas Kilworth was born in York in 1941 and travelled widely as a child, his father being a serviceman. After seventeen years in the RAF and eight working for Cable and Wireless, he attended King's College, London University, where he obtained an honours degree in English. Garry Kilworth has published novels under a number of pseudonyms in the fields of Science Fiction, Fantasy, Historical Fiction and Children's Fiction, winning the British and World Fantasy Awards and being twice shortlisted for the prestigious Carnegie Award for Children's Literature.

Gordon R Dickson

Gordon R. Dickson (1923 - 2001) Gordon Rupert Dickson was born in Alberta, Canada, in 1923 but resided in the United States from the age of thirteen. Along with Robert A. Heinlein, he is regarded as one of the fathers of military space opera, his Dorsai! sequence being an early exemplar of both military SF and Future History. Dickson was one of the rare breed of authors as well known for his fantasy as his SF - The Dragon and the George, the first novel in his Dragon Knight sequence, was shortlisted for the World Fantasy Award and won the British Fantasy Award. Dickson's work also won him three Hugos and Nebula. He died in 2001.

J. T. McIntosh

J T McIntosh (1925 - 2008)J. T. McIntosh was the pseudonym used by Scottish writer and journalist James Murdoch MacGregor, under which all of his SF writing appeared (with the exception of a single story). Born in Paisley, Scotland, in 1925, he began publishing science fiction in 1950 with 'The Curfew Tolls', which appeared in John W. Campbell's Astounding Science Fiction magazine. His first novel, World Out of Mind, appeared three years later, and he continued to write novels of interest over the next decade and a half, but ceased publishing work after 1980. He died in 2008.

Jack Finney

Born in 1911 the American author Jack Finney wrote numerous SF novels, thrillers and mysteries, several of which were adapted to film. He is best known as the author of The Body Snatchers, which became the hugely popular and influential film, The Invasion of the Bodysnatchers. He was awarded the World Fantasy Award for Lifetime Achievement in 1987. A long time resident of Californa he died in 1995.

Jack L. Chalker

Jack L. Chalker (1944 - 2005)Jack Laurence Chalker was born in Baltimore, in 1944. He received an MLA from Johns Hopkins University and taught history and geography for over a decade before becoming a professional writer in 1978. He was active in the fan community from his teens and though he published work as an editor and critic, it is for his fiction that he is best known. He was a prolific author, writing across genres successfully, and was nominated for the Hugo and John W. Campbell New Writer awards, among others. His major work is The Well of Souls sequence, comprising ten books across two series, and featuring the 'godgame' narrative device that was his signature. He died in February, 2005.

Jack Womack

Jack Womack (1956 - )Jack Womack was born in Kentucky in 1956 but currently lives in New York City. In addition to his writing, he has worked in publicity for a number of major US publishers such as HarperCollins and Orbit. Exploring themes such as urban breakdown, racial tension and class wars, the city of New York plays a large part in the post-Cyberpunk, Near-Future setting of his novels. He won the 1993 Philip K Dick award with Elvissey and has the distinction of being William Gibson's favourite author.