Mil Millington - A Certain Chemistry - Orion Publishing Group

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    • ISBN:9781780221953
    • Publication date:06 Oct 2011

A Certain Chemistry

By Mil Millington

  • Paperback
  • £8.99

Is this love or just oxytocin? The brilliant second novel by the bestselling author of Things my Girlfriend and I Have Argued About

Is this love or just oxytocin? The brilliant second novel by the bestselling author of Things my Girlfriend and I Have Argued About

Tom Cartwright is a ghost-writer: eking out a living in Edinburgh, he is always ready to assumethe persona of a struggling working mother-of-four, or a round-the-world yachtsman, or a 'sensual' aromatherapist - indeed anyone his agent asks him to be, so long as it brings in money. When he is offered the highly lucrative task of ghosting the autobiography of glamorous young soap star Georgina Nye, he and his girlfriend Sara are thrilled: Sara is a big fan of George's and Tom will finally be able to afford some new carpets for their house.

But soon things go awry when Tom finds himself drawn to George by forces outside his control (even though they are inside his own body). Does his relationship with Sara stand a chance in the face of this explosion of chemistry? Is this love or just oxytocin - and is there a difference?

Biographical Notes

Mil Millington is the creator of the cult website www.thingsmygirlfriendandIhavearguedabout.com and co-founder of www.theweekly.co.uk. He writes for various newspapers and magazines and was named by the Guardian as one of the top five debut novelist of 2002. Mil lives in the West Midlands with his girlfriend and their two children.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9780753820728
  • Publication date: 26 Jan 2006
  • Page count: 384
  • Imprint: W&N
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