Julia Buckley - Heal Me - Orion Publishing Group

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  • Hardback £16.99
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    • ISBN:9781474601511
    • Publication date:25 Jan 2018
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    • ISBN:9781474601535
    • Publication date:25 Jan 2018

Heal Me

In Search of a Cure

By Julia Buckley

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A brutally honest, darkly funny and profoundly moving memoir about the author's global search for a cure to chronic pain

Julia Buckley needs a miracle. Like a third of the UK population, she has a chronic pain condition. According to her doctors, it can't be cured. She doesn't believe them. She does believe in miracles, though. It's just a question of tracking one down.

Julia's search for a cure takes her on a global quest, exploring the boundaries between science, psychology and faith with practitioners on the fringes of conventional, traditional and alternative medicine. From neuroplastic brain rewiring in San Francisco to medical marijuana in Colorado, Haitian vodou rituals to Brazilian 'spiritual surgery', she's willing to try anything. Can miracles happen? And more importantly, what happens next if they do?

Raising vital questions about the modern medical system, this is also a story about identity in a system historically skewed against 'hysterical' female patients, and the struggle to retain a sense of self under the medical gaze. Heal Me explains why modern medicine's current approach to chronic pain is failing patients. It explores the importance of faith, hope and cynicism, and examines our relationships with our doctors, our beliefs and ourselves.

Biographical Notes

Julia Buckley is a journalist whose work appears in the likes of National Geographic Traveller, The Sunday Times Travel Magazine and the Independent, where she is travel editor. She lives in Cornwall.

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  • ISBN: 9781409162438
  • Publication date: 25 Jan 2018
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  • Imprint: Orion
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