Adrian Cole - Labyrinth of Worlds - Orion Publishing Group

Labyrinth of Worlds

Star Requiem Book 4

By Adrian Cole

  • E-Book
  • £P.O.R.

An SF Gateway eBook: bringing the classics to the future.

The epic adventure reaches its zenith, as humankind fights for its very existence. The fearsome armies of the Csendook, sworn destroyers of the human race, have discovered their hidden sanctuary, all but guaranteeing their victory. With the final confrontation at last at hand, the renegade hero Ussemitus struggles to unite humans and the warriors of Innasmorn. But in the face of impending doom, the corrupt master of Man's last citadel seeks to harness the dark and elemental powers of the planet called Mother of Storms in his attempt to win back an empire. All realize that so much more is at stake, with the impending devastation that threatens to unravel the fabric of many worlds.

Biographical Notes

Adrian Cole (1949 - )
Adrian Cole was born in Plymouth, Devonshire in 1949. Recently the Director of College Resources in a large secondary school in Bideford, he makes his home there with his wife Judy, son Sam, and daughter Katia. The books of the DREAM LORDS trilogy (Zebra books 1975-1976) were his first books published. Cole has had numerous short stories published in genres ranging from science fiction and fantasy through horror. His works also have been translated into many languages including German, Dutch, Belgian, and Italian.

Apart from the STAR REQUIEME and OMARAN SAGA quartets being reprinted by e-reads, some of his most recent works include the VOIDAL TRILOGY (Wildside Press) and STORM OVER ATLANTIS (Cosmos Press).

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781473206878
  • Publication date: 27 Nov 2014
  • Page count:
  • Imprint: Gateway
Gateway

Mother of Storms

Adrian Cole
Authors:
Adrian Cole

It is on this planet, where only the Windmasters can summon the devastating power of rain, gale, thunder, and lightning, that the last surviving remnants of humankind have come, fleeing the destruction of their empire at the hands of the alien Csendook. And it is here the human race will be resurrected...or exterminated. The sorcerers of this barbaric, inhospitable world have vowed to cleanse Innasmorn of the uninvited "abomination." And somewhere in the swirl of the dimensions - eons distant but as near as a word of power - the relentless Csendook destroyers scent human blood on the galactic wind.

Gateway

Thief of Dreams

Adrian Cole
Authors:
Adrian Cole
Gateway

Warlord of Heaven

Adrian Cole
Authors:
Adrian Cole

As the last remnants of humankind face extinction at the hands of a ruthless alien foe, the ultimate battle is building. The terrible Csendook destroyers have gathered in the Warhive, a huge gladiatorial arena, ready the destroy its enemy. But as the fearsome warlord, Auganzar, relentlessly searches the galaxy for his victims, internal and external forces conspire to bring about an end to the bloody, thousand-year crusade. It is only on the planet of Innasmorn where the last refuge of humanity lives, and it is up to the young, courageous Ussemitus to take up arms and defend their right to not just survive...but to thrive. A gathering storm of chaos and destruction looms...and only the strong will live.

Gateway

Throne of Fools

Adrian Cole
Authors:
Adrian Cole

The wicked city of Xennidhum has fallen - and now Simon Wargallow believes his world is saved. But a new evil has risen to threaten the beleaguered land of mystery and miracle. For out of the wastes of ice comes dire news of a powerful Sorcerer King, who will unleash the forces of chaos upon the unstable empire. And one man, the son Omara's doomed Lord, must shed his disguise and regain his rightful throne before humanity's final cry.

Gateway

The King of Light and Shadows

Adrian Cole
Authors:
Adrian Cole
Gateway

The Gods in Anger

Adrian Cole
Authors:
Adrian Cole
Gateway

A Place Among the Fallen

Adrian Cole
Authors:
Adrian Cole

Omara's people shun all belief in the power of gods and magic, and the Deliverers, led by Simon Wargallow, pledge to put to death all heretics. When Korbillian flees his magical land of Ternannoc in the midst of a catastrophic destruction, he takes refuge on Omara and begins a quest to save this planet from its inevitable fate - the same as that of Ternannoc. Battles erupt in the clashes between destruction and salvation, from the fishing village of Sundhaven to the plateau of Xennidhum. Death becomes life for the people, and life is on its way toward death.

Barry N. Malzberg

Barry N. Malzberg (1939-) Barry N. Malzberg is an American writer, editor and agent, whose prolific career has spanned numerous genres - most notably crime and science fiction. Malzberg was particularly active in the science fiction scene of the early seventies, although he became disillusioned with the market forces defining the field, and has rarely published SF works since. His most recent activity in the field has been in the form of advice columns for writers in the quarterly magazine of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. Barry N. Malzberg has been shortlisted for numerous awards, including the Hugo, Nebula and Philip K. Dick.

Bob Shaw

Bob Shaw (1931 - 1996) Bob Shaw was born in Belfast in 1931. After working in engineering, aircraft design and journalism he became a full time writer in 1975. Among his novels are Orbitsville, A Wreath of Stars, The Ragged Astronauts and his best-known work Other Days, Other Eyes, based on the Nebula Award-nominated 'Light of Other Days', the story that made his reputation. Although his SF novels and stories were for the most part serious, Shaw was well-known in fannish circles for his sense of humour, and his witty 'Serious Scientific Talks' were a favourite of attendees at Eastercons. Bob Shaw won two Hugos and three BSFA Awards. He died in 1996.

C.L. Moore

C.L. Moore (1911-1987) was born in Indianapolis and became a leading author of science fantasies for WEIRD TALES in the 1930s. After her marriage to fellow SF writer Henry Kuttner in 1940 she concentrated on writing science fiction, usually in collaboration with her husband. She turned to screenwriting after his untimely death; her TV series included MAVERICK and 77 SUNSET STRIP.

Colin Greenland

Born in 1954 and educated at Oxford, Colin Greenland is the author of a number of acclaimed science fiction and fantasy novels, including the BSFA and ARTHUR. C. CLARKE AWARD-winning TAKE BACK PLENTY. He has contributed short stories to many anthologies and magazines as well as reviews of new fiction for the GUARDIAN, the INDEPENDENT, and many other publications. He has also had stories broadcast on BBC Radio 4.

Colin Kapp

Colin Kapp (1928 - 2007)Born in 1928, Colin Kapp was both a British SF author and a worker in electronics, later becoming a freelance consultant in electroplating. His writing career began with the publication of 'Life Plan' in New Worlds in November 1958. Kapp is best known for his stories about the Unorthodox Engineers, which gained a modest cult following. He passed away in 2007.

J. T. McIntosh

J T McIntosh (1925 - 2008)J. T. McIntosh was the pseudonym used by Scottish writer and journalist James Murdoch MacGregor, under which all of his SF writing appeared (with the exception of a single story). Born in Paisley, Scotland, in 1925, he began publishing science fiction in 1950 with 'The Curfew Tolls', which appeared in John W. Campbell's Astounding Science Fiction magazine. His first novel, World Out of Mind, appeared three years later, and he continued to write novels of interest over the next decade and a half, but ceased publishing work after 1980. He died in 2008.

Jack L. Chalker

Jack L. Chalker (1944 - 2005)Jack Laurence Chalker was born in Baltimore, in 1944. He received an MLA from Johns Hopkins University and taught history and geography for over a decade before becoming a professional writer in 1978. He was active in the fan community from his teens and though he published work as an editor and critic, it is for his fiction that he is best known. He was a prolific author, writing across genres successfully, and was nominated for the Hugo and John W. Campbell New Writer awards, among others. His major work is The Well of Souls sequence, comprising ten books across two series, and featuring the 'godgame' narrative device that was his signature. He died in February, 2005.

Jack Vance

Jack Vance (1916-2013)John Holbrook Vance was born in 1916 and studied mining, engineering and journalism at the University of California. During the Second World War he served in the merchant navy and was torpedoed twice. He started contributing stories to the pulp magazines in the mid 1940s and published his first book, The Dying Earth, in 1950. Among his many books are The Dragon Masters, for which he won his first Hugo Award, Big Planet, The Anome, and the Lyonesse sequence. He has won the Hugo, Nebula and World Fantasy Awards, amongst others, and in 1997 was named a Grand Master by the Science Fiction Writers of America.

Jack Williamson

Jack Williamson (1908 - 2006)John Stewart 'Jack' Williamson was born in Arizona in 1908 and raised in an isolated New Mexico farmstead. After the Second World War, he acquired degrees in English at the Eastern New Mexico University, joining the faculty there in 1960 and remaining affiliated with the school for the rest of his life. Williamson sold his first story at the age of 20 - the beginning of a long, productive and successful career, which started in the pulps, took in the Golden Age and extended right into his nineties. He was the second author, after Robert A. Heinlein, to be named a Grand Master of Science Fiction by SFWA, and by far the oldest recipient of the Hugo (2001, aged 93) and Nebula (2002, aged 94) awards. A significant voice in SF for over six decades, Jack Williamson is credited with inventing the terms 'terraforming' and 'genetic engineering'. He died in 2006.

James Morrow

James Morrow is a full-time fiction writer and a former independent filmmaker. His previous works include the critically acclaimed novels The Last Witchfinder, This is the Way the World Ends, Only Begotten Daughter, City of Truth, Towing Jehovah and Blameless in Abaddon. Visit his website at www.jamesmorrow.net.

James Tiptree, Jr.

James Tiptree Jr (1915-1987)Alice Hastings Bradley Sheldon wrote most of her fiction as James Tiptree, Jr - she was making a point about sexist assumptions and also keeping her US government employers from knowing her business. Most of her books are collections of short stories, of which Her Smoke Rose Up Forever is considered to be her best selection. Sheldon's best stories combine radical feminism with a tough-minded tragic view of life; even virtuous characters are exposed as unwitting beneficiaries of disgusting socio-economic systems. Even good men are complicit in women's oppression, as in her most famous stories 'The Women Men Don't See' and 'Houston, Houston, Do you Read?' or in ecocide. Much of her work, even at its most tragic, has an attractively ironic tone which sometimes becomes straightforwardly comedy - it is important to stress that Tiptree's deep seriousness never becomes sombre or pompous. Her two novels Up the Walls of the World and Brightness Falls from the Air are both remarkable transfigurations of stock space opera material - the former deals with a vast destroying being, sympathetic aliens at risk of destruction by it and human telepaths trying to make contact across the gulf of stars. She died tragically in 1987.

John Brosnan

John Brosnan (1947 - 2005)John Raymond Brosnan was born in Perth, Australia, in 1947 but lived in London for all his adult life. He wrote most of the film entries in the first edition of The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, and his influential books on the movies, include the seminal The Horror People, Future Tense: The Cinema of Science Fiction and The Primal Screen: A History of Science Fiction Film, as well as a number of acclaimed fantasy and SF novels. He died in 2005.

John Brunner

John Brunner (1934-1995) was a prolific British SF writer. In 1951, he published his first novel, Galactic Storm, at the age of just 17, and went on to write dozens of novels under his own and various house names until his death in 1995 at the Glasgow Worldcon. He won the Hugo Award and the British Science Fiction Award for Stand on Zanzibar (a regular contender for the `best SF novel of all time') and the British Science Fiction Award for The Jagged Orbit.