Greg Keyes - The Blackgod - Orion Publishing Group

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The Blackgod

Children of the Changeling Book 2

By Greg Keyes

  • E-Book
  • £P.O.R.

An SF Gateway eBook: bringing the classics to the future.

The River flowed from the mountains to the distant sea, and everywhere he touched, he ruled. And his blood ran thick in the veins of Nhol's Royal Family. But the god's power had a price: some members of the Family were never seen after puberty, and dark rumours abounded concerning their fate. When the magic woke in her, Princess Hezhi fled for her life into the lands beyond the River's reach. With Perkar, a youth in search of honour, and loyal Tsem, her half-Giant bodyguard, she sought refuge among the barbarian Mang. But in those demon-infested hinterlands, until she learned to wield the powers of her birthright, her sanity and her soul would be at risk. And grisly danger pursued her - the River bent all his might and slumbrous cunning to the task of finding his wayward child. Only the Blackgod knew how to defeat the River. But the Blackgod was a creature of guile and limitless duplicity; to trust him might be the most perilous move she could make ...

Biographical Notes

Greg Keyes (1963- )
Gregory Keyes, born in Meridian, Mississippi, as John Gregory Keyes, is an American science fiction and fantasy writer who has written both original and media-related novels, using the names J. Gregory Keyes and Greg Keyes. Before becoming a full-time writer, Keyes received degrees in Anthropology from Mississippi State and the University of Georgia. He is most well-known for his quartet The Age of Unreason, an Alternate History steampunk story featuring Benjamin Franklin and Isaac Newton.

For more information see http://sf-encyclopedia.com/entry/keyes_j_gregory

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781473207158
  • Publication date: 27 Nov 2014
  • Page count:
  • Imprint: Gateway
Gateway

The Waterborn

Greg Keyes
Authors:
Greg Keyes

The River flowed through all the land, deep and unstoppable, a god in his own right. His head was in the mountains; his arms embraced the outlands; his body lay at the core of all the civilized realms; and his legs stretched on to the distant sea. Dark and sluggish, he rolled unchallenged, dreaming his own invincible might and glory into stark reality.Everywhere he touched, the River God held dominion. And in Nhol, the fabled city at the heart of the world, an emperor ruled as the living aspect of the god, presiding over the splendors and intrigues of a prosperous land and a glittering court.Hezhi was an imperial princess; her blood carried the seeds of the River's power. When her favorite cousin disappeared, Hezhi searched throughout the sumptuous palace with its ghosts and priests, giants and courtiers, and frightening creatures of wizardry. And the magic within her began to grow; soon it must attract dangerous attention. Hezhi's anxious quest ripened into a desperate fight for her own life--a battle she could not hope to win alone.Small wonder that the princess wished for a hero.And far away, a hero's journey began...

Adrian Cole

Adrian Cole was born in Plymouth, Devonshire in 1949. Recently the Director of College Resources in a large secondary school in Bideford, he makes his home there with his wife Judy, son Sam, and daughter Katia. The books of the DREAM LORDS trilogy (Zebra books 1975-1976) were his first books published. Cole has had numerous short stories published in genres ranging from science fiction and fantasy through horror. His works also have been translated into many languages including German, Dutch, Belgian, and Italian. Apart from the STAR REQUIEME and OMARAN SAGA quartets being reprinted by e-reads, some of his most recent works include the VOIDAL TRILOGY (Wildside Press) and STORM OVER ATLANTIS (Cosmos Press).

Alex Lamb

Alexander Lamb splits his time between writing science fiction, software engineering, teaching improvised theater, running business communication skills workshops, and conducting complex systems research.He is currently working on mobile applications for the publishing industry, and also on the large-scale simulation of battlefields for the US Department of Defense, for the purposes of enabling the evacuation of soldiers by robot. He currently lives in Santa Cruz, CA with his wife, Genevieve Graves, an astrophysicist also at the university there, and their three month old son.

Alvaro Zinos-Amaro

Alvaro grew up in Europe, mostly, and despite the advice of his betters earned a BS in Theoretical Physics at the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (UAM) in 2003. Alvaro and his co-conspirator and sometimes editor (read, girlfriend) currently reside in sunny Irvine, California.

Anna Sheehan

Anna Sheehan has been a dedicated writer since her first year in high school, when her novella won second place in a local competition, losing only to a (now) professional mystery writer. Her first novel was published serially in a local newsletter when she was 16. She is a regular attendee of the Pacific Northwest Writers Association conference, who first invited her to attend their meeting with a scholarship. Anna lives on an isolated mountain ranch in central Oregon.

Bob Shaw

Bob Shaw (1931 - 1996) Bob Shaw was born in Belfast in 1931. After working in engineering, aircraft design and journalism he became a full time writer in 1975. Among his novels are Orbitsville, A Wreath of Stars, The Ragged Astronauts and his best-known work Other Days, Other Eyes, based on the Nebula Award-nominated 'Light of Other Days', the story that made his reputation. Although his SF novels and stories were for the most part serious, Shaw was well-known in fannish circles for his sense of humour, and his witty 'Serious Scientific Talks' were a favourite of attendees at Eastercons. Bob Shaw won two Hugos and three BSFA Awards. He died in 1996.

Bratniss Everclean

Bratniss Everclean is not, you will be surprised to hear, a real name.

Charles Sheffield

Charles Sheffield (1935 - 2002) Charles Sheffield, born in the UK in 1935, graduated from St John's College Cambridge with a Double First in Mathematics and Physics. Moving to the USA in the mid 1960's, he began working in the field of particle physics which lead to a consultancy with NASA and landed him the position of chief scientist at the Earth Satellite Corporation. Best known for writing hard SF, his career as a successful science fiction writer began in response to his grief over the loss of his first wife to cancer in 1977; Sheffield has been awarded both the Hugo and Nebula for his work and won the 1992 John W. Campbell Memorial Award for Best Science Fiction Novel for Brother to Dragons.. He also served as President of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America between 1984 and 1986. For more information see www.sf-encyclopedia.com/entry/sheffield_charles

Christopher Evans

Christopher Evans is a British chemist, teacher and SF under his own name and a number of pseudonyms. In addition to writing, he edited the Other Edens anthology series with Robert Holdstock. He won the BSFA Award for Best Novel in 1994 with AZTEC CENTURY.

Clifford D. Simak

Clifford D. Simak (1904 -1988)Clifford Donald Simak was born in Wisconsin, in 1904. He attended the University of Wisconsin and spent his working life in the newspaper business. He flirted briefly with science fiction in the early '30s but did not start to write seriously until John W. Campbell's Astounding Stories began to rejuvenate the field in 1937. Simak was a regular contributor to Astounding throughout the Golden Age, producing a body of well regarded work. He won the Nebula and multiple Hugo Awards, and in 1977 was the third writer to be named a Grand Master by SFWA. He died in 1988.

Cordwainer Smith

Cordwainer Smith (1913 - 1966) Cordwainer Smith was the most famous pen name of US foreign policy adviser Paul Myron Anthony Linebarger. Born in Milwaukee in 1913, his godfather was the Chinese revolutionary and political leader, Sun Yat-sen - the result of his political activist father's close ties with leaders of the Chinese revolution. Smith held a PhD in Political Science from Johns Hopkins, served in the US military during the Second World War and acted as an adviser to President Kennedy. Although he only published one novel, Norstrilia, Smith is well regarded for his short fiction, the majority of which is set in his future history of the Instrumentality of Mankind.

Damon Knight

Damon Knight (1922 - 2002) Damon Francis Knight was born in Oregon in 1922. He is regarded as one of the most important figures in modern science fiction, having made significant contributions to the field as an author, editor and critic. Knight co-founded the Milford Writers' Conference, the influential Clarion Workshop and the Science Fiction Writers of America, serving as its first president from 1965-67. Around this time he also made his reputation as one of the field's foremost anthologists. Beginning with reprint collections, in 1966 he launched the influential Orbit series of original anthologies. Starting with Orbit 1, the series would continue for over a decade, concluding in 1980 with Orbit 21. Orbit was the longest running and most influential anthology series in SF up to that point, showcasing such important authors as Gene Wolfe, R.A. Lafferty and Knight's third wife, Kate Wilhelm. A master of short fiction, Damon Knight is best known in wider circles as the author of 'To Serve Mankind', which was adapted for The Twilight Zone and later spoofed in a Hallowe'en episode of The Simpsons. He was granted the SFWA's Grand Master Award in 1995, and in 2002, SFWA renamed it the Damon Knight Grand Master Award in his honour. He died in 2002.

E.C. Tubb

Edwin Charles Tubb was born in London in 1919, and was a prolific author of SF, fantasy and western novels, under his own name and a number of pseudonyms. He wrote hundreds of short stories and novellas for the SF magazines of the 50's, including the long-running Galaxy Science Fiction, and was a founding member of the British Science Fiction Association. He died in 2010.

Edgar Pangborn

Edgar Pangborn (1909 - 1976) Edgar Pangborn was born in New York City and pursued music studies at Harvard when just 15 years old. He went on to study at the New England Conservatory but did not graduate from either course. He then turned his back on music, focusing on writing. It was in the early 50s that his writing career flourished, and he produced a string of highly regarded stories for the likes of Galaxy, The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction and Ellery Queen's Mystery magazine. His work helped establish a new 'humanist' school of science fiction, and he has been cited by Ursula Le Guin as one of the authors who convinced her that it was possible to write worthwhile, humanly emotional stories within science fiction and fantasy. He died in New York in 1976.

Edmund Cooper

Edmund Cooper (1926 - 1982) Edmund Cooper was born in Cheshire in 1926. He served in the Merchant navy towards the end of the Second World War and trained as a teacher after its end. He began to publish SF stories in 1951 and produced a considerable amount of short fiction throughout the '50s, moving on, by the end of that decade, to the novels for which he is chiefly remembered. His works displayed perhaps a bleaker view of the future than many of his contemporaries', frequently utilising post-apocalyptic settings. In addition to writing novels, Edmund Cooper reviewed science fiction for the Sunday Times from 1967 until his death in 1982.

Garry Kilworth

Garry Kilworth (1941 -) Garry Douglas Kilworth was born in York in 1941 and travelled widely as a child, his father being a serviceman. After seventeen years in the RAF and eight working for Cable and Wireless, he attended King's College, London University, where he obtained an honours degree in English. Garry Kilworth has published novels under a number of pseudonyms in the fields of Science Fiction, Fantasy, Historical Fiction and Children's Fiction, winning the British and World Fantasy Awards and being twice shortlisted for the prestigious Carnegie Award for Children's Literature.

Gideon Defoe

Gideon Defoe is rumoured to be directly related to Daniel Defoe. He was born in 1976 and wrote his first book about pirates to impress a girl. He lives in London.

Greg Egan

Greg Egan lives in Perth, Western Australia. He has won the John W. Campbell award for Best Novel and has been short listed for the Hugo three times.

Jack Williamson

Jack Williamson (1908 - 2006)John Stewart 'Jack' Williamson was born in Arizona in 1908 and raised in an isolated New Mexico farmstead. After the Second World War, he acquired degrees in English at the Eastern New Mexico University, joining the faculty there in 1960 and remaining affiliated with the school for the rest of his life. Williamson sold his first story at the age of 20 - the beginning of a long, productive and successful career, which started in the pulps, took in the Golden Age and extended right into his nineties. He was the second author, after Robert A. Heinlein, to be named a Grand Master of Science Fiction by SFWA, and by far the oldest recipient of the Hugo (2001, aged 93) and Nebula (2002, aged 94) awards. A significant voice in SF for over six decades, Jack Williamson is credited with inventing the terms 'terraforming' and 'genetic engineering'. He died in 2006.

Jaine Fenn

Jaine Fenn studied Linguistics and Astronomy at university before embarking on a career as an IT consultant. She is the author of the Hidden Empire books PRINCIPLES OF ANGELS, CONSORTS OF HEAVEN, GUARDIANS OF PARADISE, BRINGER OF LIGHT and QUEEN OF NOWHERE. She lives with her husband in Hampshire.You can learn more at www.jainefenn.co.uk, or by following @jainefenn on twitter.