Vernor Vinge - A Fire Upon the Deep - Orion Publishing Group

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    • ISBN:9780575128811
    • Publication date:24 Jan 2013
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A Fire Upon the Deep

By Vernor Vinge

  • Paperback
  • £10.99

The Hugo Award-winning masterpiece of modern space opera - a gripping tale of galactic war told on a cosmic scale.

Thousands of years hence, many races inhabit a universe where a mind's potential is determined by its location in space - from superintelligent entities in the Transcend, to the limited minds of the Unthinking Depths, where only simple creatures and technology can function. Nobody knows what strange force partitioned space into these 'zones of thought', but when the warring Straumli realm use an ancient Transcendent artefact as a weapon, they unwittingly unleash an awesome power that destroys thousands of worlds and enslaves all natural and artificial intelligence.
Fleeing the threat, a family of scientists, including two children, are taken captive by the Tines - an alien race with a harsh medieval culture - and used as pawns in a ruthless power struggle. A rescue party, not entirely composed of humans, must free the children - and retrieve a secret that may save the rest of interstellar civilization.

Biographical Notes

Vernor Vinge (1944 - )
Vernor Steffen Vinge was born in Wisconsin in 1944. He is a retired San Diego State University Professor of Mathematics, a computer scientist and science fiction author. He is best known for his two epic space operas A Fire Upon the Deep (1992) and A Deepness in the Sky (1999), both of which won the Hugo Award and were shortlisted for the Nebula. He is the winner of 5 Hugos, 4 Prometheus Awards and the John W. Campbell Memorial Award, among many others. In addition to his works of science fiction, Vinge authored the influential 1993 essay 'The Coming Technological Singularity', in which he argued that the creation of superhuman artificial intelligence will mark the point at which 'the human era will be ended', such that no current models of reality are sufficient to predict beyond it.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781473211957
  • Publication date: 07 Jan 2016
  • Page count: 608
  • Imprint: Gollancz
Gollancz

Slow Bullets

Alastair Reynolds
Authors:
Alastair Reynolds
Gollancz

A Deepness in the Sky

Vernor Vinge
Authors:
Vernor Vinge
Gollancz

Zones of Thought

Vernor Vinge
Authors:
Vernor Vinge

Vinge's masterpieces together at last, in one epic volumeThe Hugo Award winning A FIRE UPON THE DEEP and its epic companion novel A DEEPNESS IN THE SKY, set in the same universe but 20,000 years earlier, were benchmarks for SF in the last decade of the 20th century. In FIRE 'Vinge presents a galaxy divided into Zones - regions where different physical constraints allow very different technological and mental possibilities. Earth remains in the "Slowness" zone, where nothing can travel faster than light and minds are fairly limited. The action of the book is in the "Beyond", where translight travel and other marvels exist, and humans are one of many intelligent species. One human colony has been experimenting to find a path to the "Transcend", where intelligence and power are so great as to seem godlike. Instead they release the Blight, an evil power, from a billion-year captivity.' Publisher's Weekly In DEEPNESS, 'the story has the same sense of epic vastness despite happening mostly in one isolated solar system. Here there's a world of intelligent spider creatures who traditionally hibernate through the "Deepest Darkness" of their strange variable sun's long "off" periods, when even the atmosphere freezes. Now, science offers them an alternative. Meanwhile, attracted by spider radio transmissions, two human starfleets come exploring - merchants hoping for customers and tyrants who want slaves. Their inevitable clash leaves both fleets crippled, with the power in the wrong hands, which leads to a long wait in space until the spiders develop exploitable technology. Over the years Vinge builds palpable tension through multiple storylines and characters.' Dave Langford

Gollancz

The Prefect

Alastair Reynolds
Authors:
Alastair Reynolds

Gollancz

Distress

Greg Egan
Authors:
Greg Egan
Gollancz

Across Realtime

Vernor Vinge
Authors:
Vernor Vinge

Encompassing time-travel, powerful mystery and the future history of humanity to its last handful of survivors, Across Realtime spans millions of years and is an utterly engrossing SF classic.

Clifford D. Simak

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Constantine Fitzgibbon

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Cordwainer Smith

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Doris Piserchia

Doris Piserchia (1928 - )Doris Piserchia was born in Fairmont, West Virginia, where she grew up as part of a large family. She attended Fairmont State College and worked as a lifeguard while earning a teacher's degree in Physical Education. Upon graduating in 1950, Piserchia realised that she didn't want to become a teacher and so instead joined the Navy, where she served for four years. It was during her time studying for a Master's degree in educational psychology at the University of Utah that she discovered science fiction and began to write, although her works were not published until 1966, beginning with the humorous short story 'Rocket to Gehenna'. Despite her military experience, age, and preference for older SF, she is often associated with the New Wave, with her works being described as 'darkly comic' by admirers. Piserchia has not published any new work since 1983.

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