Margaret St Clair - The Green Queen - Orion Publishing Group

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The Green Queen

By Margaret St Clair

  • E-Book
  • £P.O.R.

An SF Gateway eBook: bringing the classics to the future.

Bonnar had created the Green Queen thoughtlessly - all part of a day's work. But when his brain-child became a full-grown Frankenstein's monster, embodied in the girl he loved, Bonnar was terrified. For now she threatened to shatter the whole carefully balanced social structure of Viridis - as well to undermine that radioactive world's atomic shield!

Only Bonnar could end the holocaust and turn the all-too-grim reality back to the illusion he had originally intended. But to do that he had to destroy the girl he loved - or be destroyed by her.

Biographical Notes

Margaret St Clair (1911-1995)
Margaret St Clair was an American science fiction writer who wrote mostly under her own name, but published a number of titles under the pseudonyms Idris Seabright and Wilton Hazzard. Born in Hutchinson, Kansas, St Clair had no siblings and recalled her childhood as 'rather a lonely and bookish one'. She graduated from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1932 and in 1934 she earned a Master of Arts in Greek Classics. Her sf career began with 'Rocket to Limbo' for Fantastic Adventures in November 1946 and by 1950 she had published about 30 more stories. From the outset of her career, St. Clair was aware of her unusual role as a woman writing in a male-dominated field. An article she wrote for Writer's Digest in 1947, about selling stories to the science fiction market, begins: 'Why is science fiction fun to write? At first blush, it doesn't seem attractive, particularly for a woman.' A lifelong supporter of the American Friends Service Committee, she spent her final years at Friends House in Santa Rosa, California. She died in 1995.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781473214521
  • Publication date: 30 Mar 2017
  • Page count:
  • Imprint: Gateway
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The Games of Neith

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Sign of the Labrys

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Earth was a weird and dire place after the plagues. The few humans who survived could not bear the touch of each other; they lived in the enormous, endless caverns hacked out of the bowels of the earth for the bombs that never came.And on one man rested the hopes of the world, though he did not know it. Sam Sewell only knew he had to journey, despite forbidding perils from the darkness of the past, into the ultimate fastnesses of the unknown to rescue the timeless wisdom of the witch Desponia . . .

Gateway

Message from the Eocene

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His name was Tharg, but he was not of any life form we know today. He lived so long ago that the planet Earth had not yet shaped itself. Lava seas roiled and churned, volcanoes spouted and grew, and heavy clouds hung in the hydrogen atmosphere, leaving the planet's surface dark and dangerous.On that world Tharg met his death, or something very much like it. He became a disembodied, totally nonphysical intelligence, cut off from all contact with the life he had known. He 'slept' for hundreds of millions of years, unconnected with the world, unthinking, hardly existing.But then he began to awake - for there was new life on Earth, creatures called 'human', and Tharg, knowing an ancient promise from the stars, had to tell them of it. But . . . how?

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The Dolphins of Altair

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The Shadow People

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The Dancers of Noyo

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On Venus: An ancient and powerful Venusian race finds its ultimate evolution - but can they accept it?On Mars: The people of the Fourth Planet are eminently reasonable in all things - except for the cult of the Sacred Martian Pig, for which 'fanatic' would be entirely too reasonable a word.And on Earth: On the unknown world of one or ten centuries from now, the strangest stories of all become haunting, fascinating reality, as we find out that human beings are, after all, the most alien of creatures . . .

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Change the Sky and Other Stories

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Change the Sky is a collection in which you will find:- A man who has spent his life searching for the world of his dreams and got exactly what he wanted- A women who found the people around her so boring she changed them- A righteous minister who preached an old-fashioned Christmas and started an energy crisis - 2000 years in the future

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The Best of Margaret St Clair

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A.A. Attanasio

A. A. Attanasio (1951 - )Alfred Angelo Attanasio was born in New Jersey in 1951, and published his first story, 'Beowulf and the Supernatural' in 1971. In addition to an MFA in creative writing, he holds a BA in biochemistry and an MA in linguistics. The author of many novels, he is best known for his Radix Tetrad, the first of which - Radix - was nominated for the Nebula Award. He lives in Honolulu, and writes most of his fiction inside a volcano: Koko Crater, a botanical garden near his home.

A. Bertram Chandler

A. Bertram Chandler (1912-1984)Arthur Bertram Chandler was a British-Australian science fiction author born in Aldershot, England in 1912. He sailed the world in everything from tramp steamers to troop transports and emigrated to Australia in 1956, where he commanded merchant ships under Australian and New Zealand flags until his retirement in 1975. Chandler's first published work was "This Means War!" for Astounding in May 1944 and he concentrated on short fiction for nearly two decades, often writing under various pseudonyms. He won the Ditmar Award four times and the A Bertram Chandler Award for lifetime achievement in sf in Australia has been presented in his memory since 1992.

Barrington J. Bayley

Barrington J. Bayley (1937-2008) was born in Birmingham and began writing science fiction in his early teens. After serving in the RAF, he took up freelance writing on features, serials and picture strips, mostly in the juvenile field, before returning to straight SF. He was a regular contributor to the influential New Worlds magazine and an early voice in the New Wave movement.

Chad Oliver

Chad Oliver (1928-1993) Chad Oliver was the working name that US anthropologist and writer Symmes Chadwick Oliver used for his SF titles. He was born in Ohio but spent most of his life in Texas, where he studied for his MA. He later took a PhD in anthropology at the University of California, which lead to his appointment as a professor of anthropology at the University of Texas, Austin. Oliver's SF work reflected both his professional training and personal roots: much of it is set in the outdoors of the US Southwest and most of his characters are deeply involved in outdoor activities. Oliver was also always concerned with the depiction of Native American life. His first published story, "The Land of Lost Content", appeared in Super Science Stories in November 1950.

Charles L. Harness

Charles L. Harness (1915-2005)Charles Leonard Harness was an American science fiction writer born in Colorado City, Texas. He earned degrees in chemistry and law from George Washington University and worked as a patent attorney from 1947 to 1981. Harness' background as a lawyer influenced several of his works. His first story, "Time Trap" was published in 1948 and drew on many themes that would recur in later stories: art, time travel and a hero undergoing a quasi-transcendental experience. Harness' most famous single novel was his first, Flight into Yesterday, which was published first as a novella in the May 1949 issue of Startling Stories and was later republished as The Paradox Men in 1953. A great influence on many writers, Harness continued to publish until 2001 and was nominated for multiple Hugo and Nebula awards. In 2004 he was named Author Emeritus by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. Harness died in 2005, aged 89.For more information see www.sf-encyclopedia.com/entry/harness_charles_l

Charles Sheffield

Charles Sheffield (1935 - 2002) Charles Sheffield, born in the UK in 1935, graduated from St John's College Cambridge with a Double First in Mathematics and Physics. Moving to the USA in the mid 1960's, he began working in the field of particle physics which lead to a consultancy with NASA and landed him the position of chief scientist at the Earth Satellite Corporation. Best known for writing hard SF, his career as a successful science fiction writer began in response to his grief over the loss of his first wife to cancer in 1977; Sheffield has been awarded both the Hugo and Nebula for his work and won the 1992 John W. Campbell Memorial Award for Best Science Fiction Novel for Brother to Dragons.. He also served as President of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America between 1984 and 1986. For more information see www.sf-encyclopedia.com/entry/sheffield_charles

Clifford D. Simak

Clifford D. Simak (1904 -1988)Clifford Donald Simak was born in Wisconsin, in 1904. He attended the University of Wisconsin and spent his working life in the newspaper business. He flirted briefly with science fiction in the early '30s but did not start to write seriously until John W. Campbell's Astounding Stories began to rejuvenate the field in 1937. Simak was a regular contributor to Astounding throughout the Golden Age, producing a body of well regarded work. He won the Nebula and multiple Hugo Awards, and in 1977 was the third writer to be named a Grand Master by SFWA. He died in 1988.

Constantine Fitzgibbon

Constantine Fitzbibbon (1919-1983) Constantine Fitzgibbon, full name Robert Louis Constantine Lee-Dillon Fitzgibbon, was born in the US in 1919 and was a historian and novelist. His parents divorced when he was very young and he was raised and educated in France before moving to England. Fitzgibbon served in the British Army from 1939 to 1942, before transferring to the United States Army as a staff officer in military intelligence from 1942 to 1946. After that, he spent a short time working as a schoolmaster in Bermuda, whilst also working as an independent writer. It was here he wrote his first two novels.

Cordwainer Smith

Cordwainer Smith (1913 - 1966) Cordwainer Smith was the most famous pen name of US foreign policy adviser Paul Myron Anthony Linebarger. Born in Milwaukee in 1913, his godfather was the Chinese revolutionary and political leader, Sun Yat-sen - the result of his political activist father's close ties with leaders of the Chinese revolution. Smith held a PhD in Political Science from Johns Hopkins, served in the US military during the Second World War and acted as an adviser to President Kennedy. Although he only published one novel, Norstrilia, Smith is well regarded for his short fiction, the majority of which is set in his future history of the Instrumentality of Mankind.

D.G. Compton

D G Compton (1930 - )David Guy Compton was born in London in 1930. His early works were crime novels published under 'Guy Compton', but he began producing SF as 'D.G. Compton' in 1965 with The Quality of Mercy. His 1970 novel The Steel Crocodile received a Nebula nomination, but it was 1974's The Continuous Catherine Mortenhoe that made his reputation. Eerily predictive of the 21st century's obsessions with media voyeurism and 'reality television', it was filmed as Death Watch in 1980. He lives in Maine, in the United States.