William Gibson - Neuromancer - Orion Publishing Group

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    • ISBN:9781473217386
    • Publication date:08 Dec 2016
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    • ISBN:9781473217379
    • Publication date:11 May 2017

Neuromancer

By William Gibson

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The Hugo, Nebula and Philip K. Dick Award-winning novel that defined the Cyberpunk movement.

The sky above the port was the colour of television, tuned to a dead channel.

William Gibson revolutionised science fiction in his 1984 debut Neuromancer. The writer who gave us the matrix and coined the term 'cyberspace' produced a first novel that won the Hugo, Nebula and Philip K. Dick Awards, and lit the fuse on the Cyberpunk movement.

More than three decades later, Gibson's text is as stylish as ever, his noir narrative still glitters like chrome in the shadows and his depictions of the rise and abuse of corporate power look more prescient every day. Part thriller, part warning, Neuromancer is a timeless classic of modern SF and one of the 20th century's most potent and compelling visions of the future.

Biographical Notes

William Gibson was born in South Carolina in 1948. Educated in the USA, he emigrated to Canada in 1968 and retains dual nationality. Gibson began writing in 1977 and burst upon the literary world with his acclaimed first novel, NEUROMANCER, the book that launched the cyberpunk generation, and the first novel to win the holy trinity of science fiction, the Hugo, Nebula and Philip K. Dick Awards. Although best known for his early cyberpunk novels, Gibson's work has continued to evolve over the ensuing years, always casting an astute critical eye on modern societal trends. In 1999 The Guardian praised him as 'probably the most important novelist of the past two decades'. His most recent books include ZERO HISTORY and THE PERIPHERAL.

William Gibson's website is www.williamgibsonbooks.com and you can follow him on Twitter at @greatdismal

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  • ISBN: 9781473217393
  • Publication date: 11 Aug 2016
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  • Imprint: Gateway
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Bob Shaw

Bob Shaw (1931 - 1996) Bob Shaw was born in Belfast in 1931. After working in engineering, aircraft design and journalism he became a full time writer in 1975. Among his novels are Orbitsville, A Wreath of Stars, The Ragged Astronauts and his best-known work Other Days, Other Eyes, based on the Nebula Award-nominated 'Light of Other Days', the story that made his reputation. Although his SF novels and stories were for the most part serious, Shaw was well-known in fannish circles for his sense of humour, and his witty 'Serious Scientific Talks' were a favourite of attendees at Eastercons. Bob Shaw won two Hugos and three BSFA Awards. He died in 1996.

C.L. Moore

C.L. Moore (1911-1987) was born in Indianapolis and became a leading author of science fantasies for WEIRD TALES in the 1930s. After her marriage to fellow SF writer Henry Kuttner in 1940 she concentrated on writing science fiction, usually in collaboration with her husband. She turned to screenwriting after his untimely death; her TV series included MAVERICK and 77 SUNSET STRIP.

Carrie Vaughn

Carrie Vaughn was born in California, but grew up all over the country, a bona fide Air Force Brat. She currently lives in Colorado with her miniature American Eskimo dog, Lily. She has a Masters degree in English Lit, loves to travel, and is known occasionally to pick up a rapier.

Chris Wooding

Chris Wooding is a full time, award-winning novelist, a YA novelist, and a professional script writer for film and TV. He has travelled extensively, plays bass and guitar (and has recorded several albums) and his novels have been published all over the world.He has penned the Braided Path trilogy, a standalone novel (The Fade) and the Tales of the Ketty Jay series for Gollancz, all of which were critical and commercial successes.Chris Wooding lives in Kent, and you can learn more at www.chriswooding.com.

Christopher Evans

Christopher Evans is a British chemist, teacher and SF under his own name and a number of pseudonyms. In addition to writing, he edited the Other Edens anthology series with Robert Holdstock. He won the BSFA Award for Best Novel in 1994 with AZTEC CENTURY.

Clifford D. Simak

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Colin Greenland

Born in 1954 and educated at Oxford, Colin Greenland is the author of a number of acclaimed science fiction and fantasy novels, including the BSFA and ARTHUR. C. CLARKE AWARD-winning TAKE BACK PLENTY. He has contributed short stories to many anthologies and magazines as well as reviews of new fiction for the GUARDIAN, the INDEPENDENT, and many other publications. He has also had stories broadcast on BBC Radio 4.

Colin Kapp

Colin Kapp (1928 - 2007)Born in 1928, Colin Kapp was both a British SF author and a worker in electronics, later becoming a freelance consultant in electroplating. His writing career began with the publication of 'Life Plan' in New Worlds in November 1958. Kapp is best known for his stories about the Unorthodox Engineers, which gained a modest cult following. He passed away in 2007.

Connie Willis

Constance Elaine Trimmer Willis has won, among other accolades, ten HUGO Awards and six NEBULA Awards for her writing, and was recently named an SFWA Grand Master. She lives in Greeley, Colorado with her husband Courtney Willis, a professor of physics at the University of Northern Colorado.

D.G. Compton

D G Compton (1930 - )David Guy Compton was born in London in 1930. His early works were crime novels published under 'Guy Compton', but he began producing SF as 'D.G. Compton' in 1965 with The Quality of Mercy. His 1970 novel The Steel Crocodile received a Nebula nomination, but it was 1974's The Continuous Catherine Mortenhoe that made his reputation. Eerily predictive of the 21st century's obsessions with media voyeurism and 'reality television', it was filmed as Death Watch in 1980. He lives in Maine, in the United States.

Damon Knight

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David Bischoff

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David Pringle

David Pringle (1950 - ) David William Pringle is a Scottish science fiction editor. He served as the editor of the academic journal Foundation, from 1980 through 1986, during which time he became one of the prime movers of the collective which founded Interzone in 1982. By 1988, he was the sole publisher and editor of Interzone, a position he retained until selling the magazine in 2004. Interzone was nominated several times for the Hugo award for best semiprozine, winning in 1995, and in 2005, the Worldcon committee gave Pringle a Special Award for his work on Interzone. David Pringle has also written several guides to science fiction, including Science Fiction: The 100 Best Novels, The Ultimate Guide to Science Fiction, and Modern Fantasy: The Hundred Best Novels. He lives in Scotland.

E.E. 'Doc' Smith

E. E. 'Doc' Smith (1890 - 1965) Edward Elmer Smith was born in Wisconsin in 1890. He attended the University of Idaho and graduated with degrees in chemical engineering; he went on to attain a PhD in the same subject, and spent his working life as a food engineer. Smith is best known for the 'Skylark' and 'Lensman' series of novels, which are arguably the earliest examples of what a modern audience would recognise as Space Opera. Early novels in both series were serialised in the dominant pulp magazines of the day: Argosy, Amazing Stories, Wonder Stories and a pre-Campbell Astounding, although his most successful works were published under Campbell's editorship. Although he won no major SF awards, Smith was Guest of Honour at the second World Science Fiction Convention in Chicago, in 1940. He died in 1965.

Garry Kilworth

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