Charles Platt - The City Dwellers - Orion Publishing Group

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The City Dwellers

By Charles Platt

  • E-Book
  • £P.O.R.

An SF Gateway eBook: bringing the classics to the future.

A novel of a 21st century dystopia where urbanization has reached its limits.

Biographical Notes

Charles Platt (1945­- )
Charles Platt was born in England but relocated to the United States in 1970. Initially active in sf fandom, writing fanzines during the early 1960s, he began publishing sf with "One of Those Days" for the December 1964-January 1965 issue of Science Fantasy, and soon became associated with New Worlds during the period when, under Michael Moorcock's editorship, it was seen as the pre-eminent New-Wave journal. Platt's first published novel, Garbage World, was initially serialised in New Worlds. He has written under the pseudonyms Aston Cantwell, Robert Clarke, Charlotte Prentiss and Blakely St James.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781473219632
  • Publication date: 31 Aug 2017
  • Page count:
  • Imprint: Gateway
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