Kevin Wilson - Blood and Fears - Orion Publishing Group

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    • ISBN:9781474601641
    • Publication date:12 May 2016

Blood and Fears

How America’s Bomber Boys and Girls in England Won their War

By Kevin Wilson

  • Paperback
  • £9.99

How America's bomber boys and girls in England won their war, and how their English allies responded to them.

How America's bomber boys and girls in England won their war, and how their English allies responded to them.

In this comprehensive history, Kevin Wilson allows the young men of the US 8th Air Force based in Britain during the Second World War to tell their stories of blood and heroism in their own words. He also reveals the lives of the Women's Army Corps and Red Cross girls who served in England with them. Drawing on first-hand accounts, Wilson brings to life the ebullient Americans' interactions with their British counterparts, and unveils surprising stories of humanity and heartbreak.

Thanks to America's bomber boys and girls, life in Britain would never be the same again.

Biographical Notes

Kevin Wilson has spent most of his working life as a staff journalist on British national newspapers, including the Daily Mail and latterly the Daily and Sunday Express. He is married with three grown-up sons and a daughter.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781474601634
  • Publication date: 01 Jun 2017
  • Page count: 560
  • Imprint: W&N
'Kevin Wilson has gathered together a treasure trove of unique stories from an incredible range of sources. Tense, thrilling and often tragic, his book brings to vivid life the everyday heroism of the American bomber boys' — Keith Lowe, bestselling author of Savage Continent
'[A] gripping tribute to the British-based US 8th Air Force during the Second World War' — Simon Griffith, Mail on Sunday
'Mr Wilson's all-guns-blazing history of the USAAF (United States Army Air Forces) boys and girls covers everything from Glenn Miller dances and gifts of silk stockings to nerve-wracking daylight raids over Germany. It flies' — John Lewis-Stempel, Sunday Express
This is vivid and revealing material. — WHO DO YOU THINK YOU ARE?
In the hands of a master craftsman with a keen eye for human detail the story (Wilson) has to tell is as compelling as it is comprehensive. — Steve Snelling, EASTERN DAILY PRESS
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