Hugh Sebag-Montefiore - Enigma - Orion Publishing Group

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  • Paperback £9.99
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    • ISBN:9780304366620
    • Publication date:07 Oct 2004
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    • ISBN:9781780221236
    • Publication date:21 Jul 2011


The Battle For The Code

By Hugh Sebag-Montefiore

  • Paperback
  • £10.99

The complete story of how the German Enigma codes were broken, reissued for the 75th anniversary of the event. Perfect for fans of THE IMITATION GAME, the Oscar-winning film on Alan Turing's Enigma code, starring Benedict Cumberbatch.

The complete story of how the German Enigma codes were broken. Perfect for fans of THE IMITATION GAME, the new film on Alan Turing's Enigma code, starring Benedict Cumberbatch.

Breaking the German Enigma codes was not only about brilliant mathematicians and professors at Bletchley Park. There is another aspect of the story which it is only now possible to tell. It takes in the exploits of spies, naval officers and ordinary British seamen who risked, and in some cases lost, their lives snatching the vital Enigma codebooks from under the noses of Nazi officials and from sinking German ships and submarines.

This book tells the whole Enigma story: its original invention and use by German forces and how it was the Poles who first cracked - and passed on to the British - the key to the German airforce Enigma. The more complicated German Navy Enigma appeared to them to be unbreakable.

Biographical Notes

Barrister and journalist (currently attached to the Mail on Sunday). His family owned Bletchley Park - here the Enigma code was broken - until they sold it to the British government in 1937.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781474608329
  • Publication date: 12 Oct 2017
  • Page count: 608
  • Imprint: W&N

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Alan Clark

Alan Clark, educated at Eton and Oxford, read for the Bar but did not practise. Tory MP for Plymouth Sutton 1972-1992; Kensington and Chelsea, 1997-99. Various junior ministerial appointments in the Margaret Thatcher and John Major governments of the 1980s. Best-known for his Diaries (three volumes) which The Times placed in the Samuel Pepys class. They were filmed by the BBC with John Hurt as Clark and Jenny Agutter as Jane Clark. Alan Clark died in 1999.

Alan Furst

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Alistair Horne

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Andrew Roberts

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Anthony Clayton

Anthony Clayton was Senior Lecturer at the Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst for 29 years (1965-94). One of Britain's leading military historians, he was made a Chevalier dans l'Ordre des Palmes Academiques in 1988 in recognition of his expertise in French military history.

Anthony Gilbert

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