Tina Brown - The Vanity Fair Diaries: 1983–1992 - Orion Publishing Group

Time remaining

  • -- days
  • -- hours
  • -- minutes
  • -- seconds
Other Formats
  • E-Book £P.O.R.
    More information
    • ISBN:9781474608428
    • Publication date:14 Nov 2017
  • Paperback £9.99
    More information
    • ISBN:9781474608411
    • Publication date:28 Jun 2018

The Vanity Fair Diaries: 1983–1992

By Tina Brown

  • Paperback
  • £14.99

The irreverent diaries of Tina Brown's eight spectacular years as editor in chief of Vanity Fair.

The sizzling diaries of Tina Brown's eight spectacular years as editor in chief of Vanity Fair paint a riveting portrait of the flash, dash and follies of the Eighties in New York and Hollywood.

'A fabulous odyssey ... I read it in a mad frenzy' Stephen Fry
'Fluent, funny, fierce' Sunday Telegraph
'The juiciest of the year' Cosmoplitan
'Hang on - it's a wild ride' Meryl Streep

The Vanity Fair Diaries is the story of an Englishwoman barely out of her twenties who arrives in Manhattan on a mission. Summoned from London in hopes that she can save Condé Nast's troubled new flagship Vanity Fair, Tina Brown is immediately plunged into the maelstrom of the competitive New York media world and the backstabbing rivalries at the court of the planet's slickest, most glamour-focused magazine company. She survives the politics, the intrigue and the attempts to derail her by a simple stratagem: succeeding. In the face of rampant scepticism, she triumphantly reinvents a failing magazine.

Here are the inside stories of Vanity Fair scoops and covers that sold millions: the Reagan kiss, the meltdown of Princess Diana's marriage to Prince Charles, the sensational Annie Leibovitz cover of a gloriously pregnant, naked Demi Moore. In the diary's cinematic pages, the drama, comedy and struggle of running an 'it' magazine come to life. Brown's Vanity Fair Diaries is also a woman's journey, of making a home in a new country and of the deep bonds with her husband, their prematurely born son and their daughter.

Astute, open-hearted, often riotously funny, Tina Brown's The Vanity Fair Diaries is a compulsively fascinating and intimate chronicle of a woman's life in a glittering era.

Biographical Notes

Tina Brown is an award-winning writer and editor and the founder of the Women in the World summits. Between 1979 and 2001 she was editor successively of Tatler, Vanity Fair and The New Yorker. She is the author of the 2007 bestselling biography of the Princess of Wales, The Diana Chronicles. In 2008 Brown founded The Daily Beast, and in 2014 launched Tina Brown Live Media to expand Women in the World internationally. She is married to editor, publisher and historian Sir Harold Evans and lives in New York City.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781474608404
  • Publication date: 14 Nov 2017
  • Page count: 448
  • Imprint: W&N
A mile-a-minute memoir I read like a parrot with my nails embedded in Pirate Tina's shoulder, yelling 'What??!!' 'What!?!!' 'WOWZA!' as she swashbuckles through the eighties, her sword slicing up the staid shibboleths of New York. I remembered why I was afraid of her in those days. And why that energy and imagination, turned to making the world better, has galvanized so many of us now. A cultural catalyst, she makes things happen. Thank god she wrote it all down. Hang on - it's a wild ride — Meryl Streep
It's brilliant, concretely realised social history as much as a fabulous odyssey, and I read it in a mad frenzy — Stephen Fry
Full of creative glee, passion and wild-ride excitement, The Vanity Fair Diaries features a cast of characters like Mad Men (and women) on speed; an epic of a legendary magazine's dazzling re-creation; moments of laugh-out-loud comic asides, juicy gossip and sketches of Austen-like sharpness, all put together by an editor of high-octane genius who pauses only to reflect that however good she might be, it's never quite good enough. Oh yes it is. Read the diaries and feel better about everything. The word lives! — Simon Schama
There has been fevered speculation about Tina Brown's diaries for decades ... Well, here they finally are - and I read them in one six-hour sprint of pure pleasure and joy. These are the most compelling media diaries since Piers Morgan's The Insider but with a tonier cast of characters, indiscreet, brilliantly observed, frequently hilarious ... Her turnaround of the relaunched Vanity Fair in the mid-Eighties is the stuff of journalistic legend - an electrifying, glitzy, gritty triumph - and these are the years covered by these diaries. And it's all here: the Demi Moore naked and pregnant front cover, Claus von Bulow photographed in black leather, Donald and Ivana Trump, the whole sweep of Eighties Manhattan reported at first hand in Tina's fresh, beady, borderline-paranoid style ... As a primer for how to edit a hot magazine, there is much to learn here ... Tina encounters it all, and deals with it — Nicholas Coleridge, EVENING STANDARD
Who could resist Tina Brown, that then 30-year-old blonde Brit who stormed New York in the Eighties, reading her memoir of how she did it? Not me ... Her voice is taut, her eye is everywhere. She doesn't bring us into her circle but tells us, firmly, proudly, sometimes wickedly, what it was like ... Listening to her is as delightful as eating a whole box of chocolates, without a trace of weight gain ... She's irresistible — Gillian Reynolds, DAILY TELEGRAPH
High, low, smart, sexy, Tina Brown's The Vanity Fair Diaries is like the magazine she reinvented, a must-read for anyone interested in Hollywood, high society, and the movers and shakers of pop culture — Anderson Cooper
The party-by-party, cover-by-cover story of how a Brit conquered New York publishing. As a novice editor, I can tell you it is packed with priceless advice from one of the greatest of them all — George Osborne, NEW STATESMAN Books of the Year
Right there. That's what makes Brown such a fabulous diarist. It's not just that she's a wonderful writer (although she is: fluent, funny, fierce). It's more that, even after taking her seat at America's top table, she never stops noticing. Amid the narcotic stupefaction of great wealth, Brown is invariably alert and on the money — Allison Pearson, SUNDAY TELEGRAPH
Because you can never have too many books - and this one will be the juiciest of the year — COSMOPOLITAN
[A] terrifying, breakneck, hothouse, backstage tour of how magazines, news and views, and reputations are made and destroyed. [It] made me crave an anti-anxiety pill! In [my] next life I will definitely be a snail — @MargaretAtwood (Twitter)
Brown is brilliant at these gleeful little character descriptions ... She has the knack of making people instantly interesting ... [The Vanity Fair Diaries] make for a fast-paced and head-spinningly hectic read — Eithne Farry, SUNDAY EXPRESS
Within a couple of years she had turned it into the house magazine of a resurgent celebrity beau monde and gained an untouchable star quality of her own. Her diaries recount this will to power with caustic drollery and dash — Anthony Quinn, FINANCIAL TIMES
One of Brown's most appealing qualities is her frankness. She speaks as openly about big issues as she has expected the celebrities who've appeared in her magazines to do. And it's why her book is such a juicy read. She's honest about every interaction, no matter how big the star: every success and every mistake — Natasha Perlman, GRAZIA
These diaries are a great deal of fun ... Ultimately, though, this is a perfect primer to the gaudy excesses of 1980s culture. "This is what I appreciate most about the city at night, the life force of New York aspiration, wanting, wanting to be seen," Brown writes in September 1985. The same could be said about the author: it is her joy in her job, her delight at being ringside in this moment, and, most of all, her sheet chutzpah, which keeps you turning the pages — Sarah Hughes, i NEWSPAPER
Tina Brown's account of her years as editor of Vanity Fair is enthralling - and terrifying — Peter Conrad, OBSERVER
Heaven — India Knight, SUNDAY TIMES
Her addictive account features encounters with every influential name under the sun (political, literary and Hollywood stars) as well as an insight into Brown's publishing power, which changed magazine journalism for ever — i NEWSPAPER
A great portrait of the greed, the glitter, the fatal superficiality of that decade ... her witty skewerings are first-class — Roger Lewis, THE TIMES
A brilliant portrait of New York in an age of shoulder-padded excess by a British editor who can pass as American, but never lost her merciless gift for a great story — Allison Pearson, SUNDAY TELEGRAPH
In this fascinating memoir from a publishing legend, Tina Brown offers insights into the life of a glossy magazine editor — HELLO!
Gripping, funny ... Her enthusiasm for New York, and magazines, is infectious. "There's no fun in the world greater than the frenzy of closing a magazine on deadline," she says in her introduction. And you believe her when she squeals on 10 January 1984, "I have loved my first week!" — Markie Robson-Scott, THE ARTS DESK
No matter how much you might hate yourself for wanting to read the British journalist's account of her wonder years at the helm of the US's pre-eminent glossy, the troubling fact is that it is addictive — Kathryn Hughes, GUARDIAN
The Vanity Fair Diaries has a Gone with the Wind-like feel: it's a chronicle of a lost age, before the internet, when 'to be the editor of Time or Newsweek was to be a demigod'. Yeah, and to be Tina Brown was very heaven — Cosmo Landesman, LITERARY REVIEW
A journalism masterclass — Janice Turner, NEW STATESMAN
One is left with huge admiration for Brown's wit, talent and determination — Lynn Barber, SUNDAY TIMES
Fun and often funny — Hadley Freeman, GUARDIAN
Tina Brown, editor-in-chief of Vanity Fair during the 1980s, covers her time in Manhattan with wit and wisdom, as she unwraps the stories behind the famous covers and tells of how she fought her corner, raised a family and strove to make the magazine a success — Kerry Fowler, SAINSBURY'S MAGAZINE
The perfect stocking filler for any social x-ray who yearns to wallow in nostalgia. But even students of our own time with find the prescience of Brown's observations a source of amusement. The decade's greatest symbol, she observes, turned out not to be a person but a building: Trump Tower, "the very definition of ersatz with its fool's gold facade, its flashy internal waterfall, its dodgy financing". Lucky she was there because you couldn't make it up — Fiametta Rocco, 1843 ECONOMIST
That's what makes Tina Brown such a fabulous diarist. It's not just that she's a wonderful writer (although she is fluent, funny, fierce). It's more that, even after taking her seat at America's top table, she never stops noticing. Amid the narcotic stupefaction of great wealth, Brown is invariably alert and on the money — IRISH INDEPENDENT
She makes you glad that someone was taking notes — Jamie Fisher, TIMES LITERARY SUPPLEMENT
A mile-a-minute memoir I read like a parrot with my nails embedded in Pirate Tina's shoulder, yelling 'What??!!' 'What!?!!' 'WOWZA!' as she swashbuckles through the eighties, her sword slicing up the staid shibboleths of New York. I remembered why I was afraid of her in those days. And why that energy and imagination, turned to making the world better, has galvanized so many of us now. A cultural catalyst, she makes things happen. Thank god she wrote it all down. Hang on - it's a wild ride
It's brilliant, concretely realised social history as much as a fabulous odyssey, and I read it in a mad frenzy
Full of creative glee, passion and wild-ride excitement, The Vanity Fair Diaries features a cast of characters like Mad Men (and women) on speed; an epic of a legendary magazine's dazzling re-creation; moments of laugh-out-loud comic asides, juicy gossip and sketches of Austen-like sharpness, all put together by an editor of high-octane genius who pauses only to reflect that however good she might be, it's never quite good enough. Oh yes it is. Read the diaries and feel better about everything. The word lives!
There has been fevered speculation about Tina Brown's diaries for decades ... Well, here they finally are - and I read them in one six-hour sprint of pure pleasure and joy. These are the most compelling media diaries since Piers Morgan's The Insider but with a tonier cast of characters, indiscreet, brilliantly observed, frequently hilarious ... Her turnaround of the relaunched Vanity Fair in the mid-Eighties is the stuff of journalistic legend - an electrifying, glitzy, gritty triumph - and these are the years covered by these diaries. And it's all here: the Demi Moore naked and pregnant front cover, Claus von Bulow photographed in black leather, Donald and Ivana Trump, the whole sweep of Eighties Manhattan reported at first hand in Tina's fresh, beady, borderline-paranoid style ... As a primer for how to edit a hot magazine, there is much to learn here ... Tina encounters it all, and deals with it
Who could resist Tina Brown, that then 30-year-old blonde Brit who stormed New York in the Eighties, reading her memoir of how she did it? Not me ... Her voice is taut, her eye is everywhere. She doesn't bring us into her circle but tells us, firmly, proudly, sometimes wickedly, what it was like ... Listening to her is as delightful as eating a whole box of chocolates, without a trace of weight gain ... She's irresistible
High, low, smart, sexy, Tina Brown's The Vanity Fair Diaries is like the magazine she reinvented, a must-read for anyone interested in Hollywood, high society, and the movers and shakers of pop culture
The party-by-party, cover-by-cover story of how a Brit conquered New York publishing. As a novice editor, I can tell you it is packed with priceless advice from one of the greatest of them all
Right there. That's what makes Brown such a fabulous diarist. It's not just that she's a wonderful writer (although she is: fluent, funny, fierce). It's more that, even after taking her seat at America's top table, she never stops noticing. Amid the narcotic stupefaction of great wealth, Brown is invariably alert and on the money
Because you can never have too many books - and this one will be the juiciest of the year
[A] terrifying, breakneck, hothouse, backstage tour of how magazines, news and views, and reputations are made and destroyed. [It] made me crave an anti-anxiety pill! In [my] next life I will definitely be a snail
Brown is brilliant at these gleeful little character descriptions ... She has the knack of making people instantly interesting ... [The Vanity Fair Diaries] make for a fast-paced and head-spinningly hectic read
Within a couple of years she had turned it into the house magazine of a resurgent celebrity beau monde and gained an untouchable star quality of her own. Her diaries recount this will to power with caustic drollery and dash
One of Brown's most appealing qualities is her frankness. She speaks as openly about big issues as she has expected the celebrities who've appeared in her magazines to do. And it's why her book is such a juicy read. She's honest about every interaction, no matter how big the star: every success and every mistake
These diaries are a great deal of fun ... Ultimately, though, this is a perfect primer to the gaudy excesses of 1980s culture. "This is what I appreciate most about the city at night, the life force of New York aspiration, wanting, wanting to be seen," Brown writes in September 1985. The same could be said about the author: it is her joy in her job, her delight at being ringside in this moment, and, most of all, her sheet chutzpah, which keeps you turning the pages
Tina Brown's account of her years as editor of Vanity Fair is enthralling - and terrifying
Heaven
Her addictive account features encounters with every influential name under the sun (political, literary and Hollywood stars) as well as an insight into Brown's publishing power, which changed magazine journalism for ever
A great portrait of the greed, the glitter, the fatal superficiality of that decade ... her witty skewerings are first-class
A brilliant portrait of New York in an age of shoulder-padded excess by a British editor who can pass as American, but never lost her merciless gift for a great story
In this fascinating memoir from a publishing legend, Tina Brown offers insights into the life of a glossy magazine editor
Gripping, funny ... Her enthusiasm for New York, and magazines, is infectious. "There's no fun in the world greater than the frenzy of closing a magazine on deadline," she says in her introduction. And you believe her when she squeals on 10 January 1984, "I have loved my first week!"
No matter how much you might hate yourself for wanting to read the British journalist's account of her wonder years at the helm of the US's pre-eminent glossy, the troubling fact is that it is addictive
The Vanity Fair Diaries has a Gone with the Wind-like feel: it's a chronicle of a lost age, before the internet, when 'to be the editor of Time or Newsweek was to be a demigod'. Yeah, and to be Tina Brown was very heaven
A journalism masterclass
One is left with huge admiration for Brown's wit, talent and determination
Fun and often funny
Tina Brown, editor-in-chief of Vanity Fair during the 1980s, covers her time in Manhattan with wit and wisdom, as she unwraps the stories behind the famous covers and tells of how she fought her corner, raised a family and strove to make the magazine a success
The perfect stocking filler for any social x-ray who yearns to wallow in nostalgia. But even students of our own time with find the prescience of Brown's observations a source of amusement. The decade's greatest symbol, she observes, turned out not to be a person but a building: Trump Tower, "the very definition of ersatz with its fool's gold facade, its flashy internal waterfall, its dodgy financing". Lucky she was there because you couldn't make it up
That's what makes Tina Brown such a fabulous diarist. It's not just that she's a wonderful writer (although she is fluent, funny, fierce). It's more that, even after taking her seat at America's top table, she never stops noticing. Amid the narcotic stupefaction of great wealth, Brown is invariably alert and on the money
She makes you glad that someone was taking notes
W&N

Who's In, Who's Out: The Journals of Kenneth Rose

Kenneth Rose
Authors:
Kenneth Rose

Kenneth Rose was one of the most astute observers of the establishment for over seventy years. The wry and amusing journals of the royal biographer and historian made objective observation a sculpted craft. His impeccable social placement located him within the beating heart of the national elite for decades. He was capable of writing substantial history, such as his priceless material on the abdication crisis from conversations with both the Duke of Windsor and the Queen Mother. Yet he maintained sufficient distance to achieve impartial documentation while working among political, clerical, military, literary and aristocratic circles. Relentless observation and a self-confessed difficulty 'to let a good story pass me by' made Rose a legendary social commentator, while his impressive breadth of interests was underpinned by tremendous respect for the subjects of his enquiry. Brilliantly equipped as Rose was to witness, detail and report, these journals vividly portray some of the most important events and people of the last century.

W&N

Written in History

Simon Sebag Montefiore
Authors:
Simon Sebag Montefiore

WRITTEN IN HISTORY: LETTERS THAT CHANGED THE WORLD celebrates the letter in world history and personal life. Acclaimed historian Simon Sebag Montefiore selects letters that have changed the course of global events or touched a timeless emotion - whether passion, rage, humour - from ancient times to the twentieth century: some are noble and inspiring, some despicable and unsettling, some are exquisite works of literature, others brutal and coarse. From love letters to declarations of war, ranging from Elizabeth I to Stalin, Marcus Aurelius to Machiavelli, Oscar Wilde to Balzac, Rameses the Great to Gandhi, Montefiore explores the significance of each piece of correspondence and shows how letters can reveal the personalities of some of history's most fascinating figures, and in turn offer a unique perspective on the past and a relevance for today. These are letters everyone should read.

W&N

Being John Lennon

Ray Connolly
Authors:
Ray Connolly
Trapeze

An Absolutely Remarkable Thing

Hank Green
Authors:
Hank Green

In his much-anticipated debut novel, Hank Green - co-creator of Crash Course, Vlogbrothers and SciShow - spins a sweeping, cinematic tale about a young woman who becomes an overnight celebrity before realising she's part of something bigger, and stranger, than anyone could have possibly imagined. The Carls just appeared. Coming home from work at three a.m., twenty-three-year-old April May stumbles across a giant sculpture. Delighted by its appearance and craftsmanship - like a ten-foot-tall Transformer wearing a suit of samurai armour - April and her friend Andy make a video with it, which Andy uploads to YouTube. The next day April wakes up to a viral video and a new life. News quickly spreads that there are Carls in dozens of cities around the world - everywhere from Beijing to Buenos Aires - and April, as their first documentarian, finds herself at the centre of an intense international media spotlight. Now April has to deal with the pressure on her relationships, her identity and her safety that this new position brings, all while being on the front lines of the quest to find out not just what the Carls are, but what they want from us. Compulsively entertaining and powerfully relevant, An Absolutely Remarkable Thing grapples with big themes, including how the social internet is changing fame, rhetoric and radicalisation; how our culture deals with fear and uncertainty; and how vilification and adoration spring from the same dehumanization that follows a life in the public eye.

W&N

How Does It Feel?

Mark Kermode
Authors:
Mark Kermode
Trapeze

Reader I Married Me

Sophie Tanner
Authors:
Sophie Tanner

Why wish away your life waiting for 'the one' when YOU are, in fact, the oneChloe Usher has just broken up with the love of her life. All her friends urge her to find another man before she disappears down the slippery slope to spinsterhood. One evening, after a particularly messy date and several gins, she realises she doesn't need an 'other half' to complete her. She is enough, just as she is. In an instinctive act of self-love, she announces that she is going to marry herself! The news goes viral and, in the sober light of day, Chloe finds herself thrust firmly into the public eye; suddenly she's the spokesperson for all the single ladies out there. The reactions from her friends and family are mixed, with some thinking she's completely lost the plot. Planning her wedding takes Chloe on a bumpy journey of self-discovery, showing the world that if you can't love yourself, how in the hell you gonna love somebody else?!

W&N

A Double Life

Flynn Berry
Authors:
Flynn Berry

'A THRILLING PAGE-TURNER' Paula Hawkins, author of The Girl on the TrainSome wounds need more than time. They crave revenge. Claire's father is a privileged man: handsome, brilliant, the product of an aristocratic lineage and an expensive education, surrounded by a group of devoted friends who would do anything for him. But when he becomes the prime suspect in a horrific attack on Claire's mother - a pretty little thing who married into the elite ranks of society and dared escape her gilded cage - fate and privilege collide, and a scandal erupts. Claire's father disappears overnight, his car abandoned, blood on the front seat.Thirty years after that hellish night, Claire is obsessed with uncovering the truth, and she knows that the answer is held behind the closed doors of beautiful townhouses and country estates, safeguarded by the same friends who all those years before had answered the call to protect one of their own.Because they know where Claire's father is.They helped him escape.And it's time their pristine lives met her fury.'Flynn Berry vividly re-imagines one of the most notorious crimes of the 20th century. A Double Life is a thrilling page-turner, but it is also a compassionate and angry book: with forensic precision, Berry picks apart lives derailed by violence and the ways in which class privilege protect the guilty.' Paula Hawkins Praise for Flynn Berry and her first novel Under the Harrow:'Thrilling' NEW YORK TIMES'Berry transfixes the reader' GUARDIAN'The book's triumph is Nora's voice' THE SUNDAY TIMES'An exquisitely taut and intense debut' WASHINGTON POST'Like Broadchurch written by Elena Ferrante' CLAIRE MESSUD, AUTHOR OF THE WOMAN UPSTAIRS'Compulsively readable' ROSAMUND LUPTON, AUTHOR OF SISTER

Seven Dials

The Million Dollar Handshake

Catherine Molloy
Authors:
Catherine Molloy
W&N

Neon in Daylight

Hermione Hoby
Authors:
Hermione Hoby

A New York summer so hot the air is turning yellow. Kate, a young woman newly arrived from London, is determined to become the kind of person who is up for it and down for it - and not remotely troubled over how those two semantically opposed phrases could have come to mean the same thing. In the sweltering city, she encounters Bill, a once-lauded now booze-sodden novelist, and Inez, his teenage daughter who makes extra cash catering to the sexual fantasies of men she has met online - and falls into a complex infatuation with them both.

Orion

A Noise Downstairs

Linwood Barclay
Authors:
Linwood Barclay

'One of the world's finest thriller writers on the top of his game. A Noise Downstairs is a blinder - his best yet'PETER JAMES * * * * *EVERY STEP...Paul Davis forgets things - he gets confused, he has sudden panic attacks. But he wasn't always like this.TAKES YOU CLOSER...Eight months ago, Paul found two dead bodies in the back of a co-worker's car. He was attacked, left for dead, and has been slowly recovering ever since. His wife tries her best but fears the worst...TO THE TRUTH...Therapy helps during the days, but at night he hears things - impossible things - that no one else can. That nobody else believes. Either he's losing his mind - or someone wants him to think he is.Just because he's paranoid doesn't mean it's not happening...* * * * *'A suspense master'STEPHEN KING'No one can thrill you and chill you better than Barclay' TESS GERRITSEN'One of the best thriller writers in the world'MARK BILLINGHAM'Nothing is more satisfying than tucking into a new Linwood Barclay novel'SHARI LAPENA'Barclay writes terrific thrillers'DAILY MAILLOCK THE DOORS AND KEEP THE LIGHTS ON.A NOISE DOWNSTAIRS WILL KEEP YOU AWAKE ALL NIGHT.

Orion

Hometown Tales: Birmingham

Maria Whatton, Stewart Lee
Authors:
Maria Whatton, Stewart Lee

Original tales by remarkable writersHometown Tales is a series of books pairing exciting new voices with some of the most talented and important writers at work today. Some of the tales are fiction and some are narrative non-fiction - they are all powerful, fascinating and moving, and aim to celebrate regional diversity and explore the meaning of home.In these pages on Birmingham, you'll find one unique tale. 'Silver in the Quarter' is a vivid coming-of-age fiction about a boy who finds himself caught up in the Birmingham pub bombings of 1974 by Maria Whatton.

Orion

A Family Recipe

Veronica Henry
Authors:
Veronica Henry
Trapeze

The Electricity of Every Living Thing

Katherine May
Authors:
Katherine May
W&N

Time is a Killer

Michel Bussi
Authors:
Michel Bussi
Orion

What Fresh Hell

Lucy Vine
Authors:
Lucy Vine

The new hilarious novel from the bestselling author of HOT MESS'Totally relatable and hilarious - one of the best books I've read' Heat'Laugh-out-loud funny. Truly, the Bridget Jones for our generation' Louise O'Neill*********What do you get if you cross a dozen drunk hens with one shiny Butler in the Buff?Meet Lilah Fox. She's on the hen do from hell. Then she gets a message (44 of them, actually) from her best friend with big news: she's getting married in six months. Oh, and Lilah's her maid of honour. Which means she just got signed up for:- A military schedule of wedding fairs and weekly planning meetings- Excel spreadsheets and endless hen emails- All the enforced, expensive fun you can imagine...What fresh hell is this?**********Everyone loves Lucy Vine:'So ridiculously accurate I had to take a lie down from all my genuine laughing-out-loud' Laura Jane Williams'Relatable to the max...fans of Hot Mess will love it' Grazia'Feisty, fresh, gag-packed comedy' Daily Mirror'Brilliantly written' Daily Mail'Very funny and a joy to read! I adored it!' Joanna Bolouri, bestselling author of The List'I LOVED this. Caps for emphasis...This is relatable AF and you need it in your life' Hanna Doyle'One of my very favourite writers... It's wildly funny AND about my very favourite genre of everything - painfully obsessive wedding planning. I inhaled this. If you like laughing a lot, I recommend that you pre order immediately' Daisy Buchanan'What Fresh Hell is so brilliantly, hilariously, on-point about the nutso psychology of hen dos. For anyone whose ever found themselves thinking, "Oh £260 for the weekend. That's not too bad." READ IT' Holly Bourne

W&N

My Father's Wake

Kevin Toolis
Authors:
Kevin Toolis

Death is a whisper in the Anglo-Saxon world. But on a remote island, off the coast of County Mayo, death has a louder voice. Along with reports of incoming Atlantic storms, the local radio station runs a thrice-daily roll-call of the recently departed. The islanders have no fear of death. They go in great numbers, often with young children, to wake with their dead. They keep vigil through the night with the corpse and share in the sorrow of the bereaved. They bear the burden of the coffin on their shoulders and dig the grave with their own hands. The living and the dead remain bound together in the Irish Wake - the oldest rite of humanity.For twenty years writer and filmmaker Kevin Toolis hunted death in famine, war and plague across the world before finding the answer to his quest on the island of his forebears. In this beautifully written and highly original memoir, he gives an intimate, eye-witness account of the death and wake of his father, and explores the wider history of the Irish Wake. With an uplifting, positive message at its heart, My Father's Wake celebrates the spiritual depth of the Irish Wake and shows how we too can find a better way to deal with our mortality, by living and loving in the acceptance of death.

W&N

The Child Finder

Rene Denfeld
Authors:
Rene Denfeld
W&N

Some Fantastic Place

Chris Difford
Authors:
Chris Difford
W&N

White Fur

Jardine Libaire
Authors:
Jardine Libaire
W&N

The Pianist

Wladyslaw Szpilman
Authors:
Wladyslaw Szpilman

The bestselling memoir of a Jewish pianist who survived the war in Warsaw against all odds.'We are drawn in to share his surprise and then disbelief at the horrifying progress of events, all conveyed with an understated intimacy and dailiness that render them painfully close... riveting' OBSERVEROn September 23, 1939, Wladyslaw Szpilman played Chopin's Nocturne in C-sharp minor live on the radio as shells exploded outside - so loudly that he couldn't hear his piano. It was the last live music broadcast from Warsaw: That day, a German bomb hit the station, and Polish Radio went off the air.Though he lost his entire family, Szpilman survived in hiding. In the end, his life was saved by a German officer who heard him play the same Chopin Nocturne on a piano found among the rubble. Written immediately after the war and suppressed for decades, THE PIANIST is a stunning testament to human endurance and the redemptive power of fellow feeling.'The images drawn are unusually sharp and clear... but its moral tone is even more striking: Szpilman refuses to make a hero or a demon out of anyone' LITERARY REVIEW