Ruth Cowen - Relish - Orion Publishing Group

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    • ISBN:9780297865575
    • Publication date:16 Dec 2010

Relish

The Extraordinary Life of Alexis Soyer, Victorian Celebrity Chef

By Ruth Cowen

  • Paperback
  • £10.99

The definitive biography of Alexis Soyer: celebrity chef, entrepreneur, inventor and war hero

Alexis Soyer (1810-1858) was a working-class Frenchman from an unremarkable town north-west of Paris, but his exceptional cooking skills and ebullient personality turned him into Britain's first true celebrity chef. He was the first to publish a succession of best-selling cookbooks - one selling more than a quarter of a million copies, an extraordinary figure for the mid-nineteenth century. He was also the first to produce branded merchandise, including a remarkably ingenious stove that fitted in the pocket and bottled sauces decorated with his recognisable portrait. Ahead of his time, he nurtured a flamboyant public profile through a combination of brilliant self-publicity and shameless press manipulation.

But his life's purpose both came into focus and found its dramatic climax when he renounced his sybaritic lifestyle and elected to travel, for no pay and in the face of real danger, across Europe first to Scutari and later to Balaclava, where thousands of British troops had died of disease and malnutrition during the first long, bitter winter of the Crimean war. One of the first to understand fully the rudiments of good nutrition and mass catering, Soyer had already introduced new principles of large-scale cookery to Ireland during the potato famine of 1847, and he extend his expertise to the British army with spectacular results. Long overlooked by historians, Ruth Cowen vividly recounts the life of a unique personality with a scholarly slice of Victorian history.

Biographical Notes

Ruth Cowen is a journalist, author, editor and researcher. She has written for all the major newspapers including the DAILY TELEGRAPH, DAILY MAIL, FINANCIAL TIMES, INDEPENDENT, GUARDIAN, DAILY EXPRESS, SUNDAY EXPRESS and EVENING STANDARD. She has also written a number of award-winning documentaries for BBC Radio 4.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781474609425
  • Publication date: 17 May 2018
  • Page count: 352
  • Imprint: W&N
Ruth Cowen's biography puts Alexis Soyer, the Victorian celebrity chef and inveterate egotist, where he should be - leagues ahead of Escoffier: great cook, prolific inventor (gas barbecue, air-driven spit, field stove, flame lamp), travelling philanthropist (soup kitchens in Ireland, two years fixing the field hospital in the Crimea) and more — Prue Leith, THE WEEK
A masterly account not only of a Victorian chef but of a Victorian era
The most admirable and attractive of all chefs has been given an equally admirable and attractive biography
Excellent, entertaining and vivid ... colourful, compassionate, generous, inventive, indefatigable. Now at last [Soyer] has the biography he deserves
Ruth Cowen has brought Alexis Soyer back to life with the kind of flourish he would have appreciated
Ruth Cowen's biography puts Alexis Soyer, the Victorian celebrity chef and inveterate egotist, where he should be - leagues ahead of Escoffier: great cook, prolific inventor (gas barbecue, air-driven spit, field stove, flame lamp), travelling philanthropist (soup kitchens in Ireland, two years fixing the field hospital in the Crimea) and more
I was riveted from start to finish. What a fascinating, endearing, complex, contradictory man Soyer was, and what a life!
A riveting book with all the elements of a Hollywood Oscar winner
Engrossing ... A sybarite and dandy with a social conscience and hustling entrepreneurial streak, Soyer was an intriguing, contradictory figure
[Cowen] has crafted a filling dish ... Cowen captures the curious combination of his astute commercial skills ... and his selfless philanthropy
The story of [Soyer's] vigorous life is a potent one, and Cowen's comprehensive, sensitive recording of it is long overdue
Ruth Cowen's lively new biography... is a highly readable account of an important life
Excellent ... a riveting story ... it's also a marvellous portrait of the early Victorian age
Sparkling ... If only all history were written like this
Chef Alexis Soyer was as famous as Dickens in his day ... Cowen explores his amazing life and the reasons behind his obscurity
This very well-written and researched book ... will serve for some time as the best record that we have on this great chef
[Soyer's] colourful life story - he was a bigamist, bankrupt and alcoholic - is told brilliantly by Ruth Cowen
Alexis Soyer deserves a biography of flair, passion and frivolity. Ruth Cowen has delivered just such a book
Ruth Cowen guides us elegantly through the turbulent, intoxicating life of this brilliant but flawed man
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