Isaiah Berlin - The Hedgehog And The Fox - Orion Publishing Group

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    • ISBN:9781780228426
    • Publication date:13 Nov 2014
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    • ISBN:9781780228433
    • Publication date:13 Nov 2014

The Hedgehog And The Fox

An Essay on Tolstoy's View of History

By Isaiah Berlin

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Isaiah Berlin's classic essay on Tolstoy - an exciting new edition with new criticism and a foreword.

Isaiah Berlin's classic essay on Tolstoy - an exciting new edition with new criticism and a foreword.

'The fox knows many things, but the hedgehog knows one big thing.' This fragment of Archilochus, which gives this book its title, describes the central thesis of Isaiah Berlin's masterly essay on Tolstoy. There have been various interpretations of Archilochus' fragment; Isaiah Berlin has simply used it, without implying anything about the true meaning of the words, to outline a fundamental distinction that exists in mankind, between those who are fascinated by the infinite variety of things (foxes) and those who relate everything to a central all-embracing system (hedgehogs). When applied to Tolstoy, the image illuminates a paradox of his philosophy of history, and shows why he was frequently misunderstood by his contemporaries and critics. Tolstoy was by nature a fox, but he believed in being a hedgehog.

Biographical Notes

Sir Isaiah Berlin OM spent the whole of his professional life at Oxford, as a Fellow of All Souls College, a Fellow of New College, Chichele Professor of Social and Political theory and first President of Wolfson College. He is the author of many books and was President of the British Academy from 1974 until 1978. He died in 1997.

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  • ISBN: 9781780223070
  • Publication date: 29 Dec 2011
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  • Imprint: W&N
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