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Dinner at the Centre of the Earth

By Nathan Englander
Authors:
Nathan Englander
'One of our most consistently brilliant, bold and funny writers' Dave Eggers'His writing is liberal in every good sense of the word' Jonathan FranzenA spellbinding thriller. A spy novel. A love story . . . Prisoner Z, held at a black site in the Negev desert for a dozen years, has only his guard for company. How does a nice American Jewish boy from Long Island wind up an Israeli spy working for Mossad, and later, a traitor to his adopted country? What does it mean to be loyal? And what does it mean to be a traitor when the ideals you cherish are betrayed by the country you love?'Englander is a wonderfully gifted writer' The Times'One of the great voices of our time' Gary Shteyngart
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Deviate

By Beau Lotto
Authors:
Beau Lotto
World-renowned neuroscientist Beau Lotto reveals the truths of human perception and devises a cognitive toolkit for how to succeed in a world of uncertainty.Perception is the foundation of human experience, but few of us understand how our own perception works. By revealing the startling truths about the brain and perception, Beau Lotto shows that the next big innovation is not a new technology: it is a new way of seeing.In his first major book, Beau Lotto draws on over a decade of pioneering research to show how our brains play tricks on us. With an innovative combination of case studies and optical- and perception-illusion exercises, DEVIATE will revolutionise the way you see the world. With this new understanding of how the brain works and its perceptive trickery, we can apply these insights to every aspect of life and work. DEVIATE is not just an engaging look into the neuroscience of thought, behaviour and creativity: it is a call to action, enlisting readers in their own journey of self-discovery.
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Daughters of the Winter Queen

By Nancy Goldstone
Authors:
Nancy Goldstone
In a sweeping narrative encompassing political intrigue, illicit love affairs and even a murder mystery, Nancy Goldstone tells the riveting story of a queen who lost her throne, and of her four defiant daughters.Elizabeth Stuart's marriage to a German count far below her rank was arranged with the understanding that her father, James I of England, would help his new son-in-law achieve the crown of Bohemia. The terrible betrayal of this promise would ruin 'the Winter Queen', as Elizabeth would forever be known, imperil the lives of those she loved and launch a war that would last thirty years. Forced into exile, the Winter Queen found refuge for her growing family in Holland, where the glorious art and culture of the Dutch Golden Age formed the backdrop to her daughters' education. The eldest, Princess Elizabeth, counted the philosopher René Descartes as her closest friend. Louisa, whose lively manner would provoke heartache and scandal, was a gifted artist. Henrietta Maria, the beauty of the family, would achieve the dynastic ambition of marrying into royalty, although at great cost. But it was the youngest, Sophia, a heroine in the tradition of Jane Austen, with a ready wit and strength of character, who would fulfil the promise of her great-grandmother Mary, Queen of Scots, a legacy which endures to this day.
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The Deadly Trade

By Iain Ballantyne
Authors:
Iain Ballantyne
The Deadly Trade is a fascinating and comprehensive account of how an initially ineffectual craft evolved into the most powerful and terrifying vessel ever invented.At the heart of this thrilling narrative lurks danger and power as acclaimed naval writer Iain Ballantyne reveals some of warfare's murkiest secrets. The cast of colourful characters includes an American who devised plunging boats to attack the British, then switched sides and tried to help the Royal Navy defeat Napoleon; a former monk who created submersible boats to assist the cause of Irish liberation; and a spy who, during the American Civil War, hid Confederate submarine secrets in her bonnet.The reader is plunged into the epic convoy battles of the twentieth century's world wars, when hopes of victory were placed on the shoulders of daring young submarine captains, many of whom perished along with the men they commanded.We learn of efforts by the British to seize Enigma material from U-boats, how Germany's so-called Grey Wolves were not always brave or invincible, and the role of American submarines in bringing Japan to its knees.Also covered are attacks by Royal Navy X-craft on Tirpitz, Nazi plans to bombard New York with primitive cruise missiles, and episodes when the Cold War era turned hot, not least the sinking of the Belgrano. The story concludes with a look at the resurgence of submarines as political and military tools and the threat of nuclear annihilation they pose.
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Down the River Unto the Sea

By Walter Mosley
Authors:
Walter Mosley
Joe King Oliver was one of the NYPD's finest investigators until, dispatched to arrest a well-heeled car thief, he is framed for assault, a charge that lands him in the notorious Rikers Island prison.A decade later, King is a private detective, running his agency with the help of his teenage daughter, Aja-Denise. When he receives a card in the mail from the woman who admits she was paid by someone in the NYPD to frame him all those years ago, King realises that he has no choice but to take his own case: figuring out who on the force wanted him disposed of - and why.At the same time, King must investigate the case of black radical journalist Leonard Compton, aka A Free Man, accused of killing two on-duty police offices who had been abusing their badges to traffic drugs and women into the city's poorest neighbourhoods.In pursuit of justice, our hero must beat dirty cops and even dirtier bankers. All the while, two lives hang in the balance: Compton's, and King's own.
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Don't Let Go

By Michel Bussi
Authors:
Michel Bussi
'Michel Bussi is one of France's most ingenious crime writers... has plenty of twists and turns in store in this fast-moving novel about a long-planned act of revenge' Joan Smith, SUNDAY TIMES'Takes the reader on a thrilling ride across the remote isle in the Indian Ocean with plenty of twists and turns to keep them gripped until an epic, unexpected conclusion' Jon Coates, DAILY EXPRESSPicture the scene - an idyllic resort on the island of Réunion. Martial and Liane Bellion are enjoying the perfect moment with their six-year-old daughter. Turquoise skies, clear water, palm trees, a warm breeze...Then Liane Bellion disappears. She went up to her hotel room between 3 and 4pm and never came back. When the room is opened, it is empty, but there is blood everywhere. An employee of the hotel claims to have seen Martial in the corridor during that crucial hour.Then Martial also disappears, along with his daughter. An all-out manhunt is declared across the island. But is Martial really his wife's killer? And if he isn't, why does he appear to be so guilty?'Some writers try carefully calibrated alternations on a winning formula from book to book, but offer few surprises. That can't be said of the French author Michel Bussi... That refusal to repeat himself is evident in Don't Let Go, which is just as accomplished as its predecessors - GUARDIAN'As it draws towards its heart-pounding final pages, it's hard to concentrate on anything other than the outcome of the desperate manhunt - and the startling revelation of the truth. Inventive, original and incredibly entertaining' SUNDAY MIRROR
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Dolce Vita Confidential

By Shawn Levy
Authors:
Shawn Levy
SUNDAY TIMES FILM BOOK OF THE YEAR'Uproariously readable ... Levy is a master of the group biography' Sunday Times'Teeming with satisfying gossipy details' Guardian'Exalts the intoxicating, beguiling dreaminess of Rome in its celluloid heyday' TLS1950s Rome. From the ashes of war, the Eternal City is reborn as the epicentre of film, style, boldfaced libertinism and titillating journalism. It's the heyday of fashion icons such as Pucci and Brioni, and the height of 'Hollywood on the Tiber', when a dizzying array of stars flock to Cinecittà, the huge movie studio on the outskirts of Rome. At the bars on Via Veneto the likes of Ingrid Bergman, Audrey Hepburn and Elizabeth Taylor mix with blue bloods and bohemians, while behind them trail street photographers in pursuit of the most unflattering and dramatic portraits of fame.In a fast-paced, kaleidoscopic narrative, Shawn Levy shows how all roads lead to Federico Fellini's world-conquering movie La Dolce Vita, starring Marcello Mastroianni and the Swedish bombshell Anita Ekberg. He recreates Rome's stunning ascent with vivid and compelling tales of its glitterati and artists, down to every last outrageous detail of the city's magnificent transformation.
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Dylan Thomas: The Collected Letters Volume 1

By Dylan Thomas
Authors:
Dylan Thomas
Dylan Thomas's letters bring the fascinating and tempestuous poet and his times to life in a way that no biography can.The letters begin in the poet's schooldays and end just before his death in New York at the age of 39. In between, he loved, wrote, drank, begged and borrowed his way through a flamboyant life. He was an enthusiastic critic of other writers' work and the letters are full of his thoughts on the work of his contemporaries, from T.S. Eliot and W.H. Auden to Stephen Spender and Cecil Day-Lewis.A lifetime of letters tell a remarkable story, each taking the reader a little further along the path of the poet's self-destruction, but written with such verve and lyricism that somehow the reader's sympathies never quite abandon him.
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Dylan Thomas: The Collected Letters Volume 2

By Dylan Thomas
Authors:
Dylan Thomas
Dylan Thomas's letters bring the fascinating and tempestuous poet and his times to life in a way that no biography can.The letters begin in the poet's schooldays and end just before his death in New York at the age of 39. In between, he loved, wrote, drank, begged and borrowed his way through a flamboyant life. He was an enthusiastic critic of other writers' work and the letters are full of his thoughts on the work of his contemporaries, from T.S. Eliot and W.H. Auden to Stephen Spender and Cecil Day-Lewis.A lifetime of letters tell a remarkable story, each taking the reader a little further along the path of the poet's self-destruction, but written with such verve and lyricism that somehow the reader's sympathies never quite abandon him.
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Daughter of Empire

By Pamela Hicks
Authors:
Pamela Hicks
A source of inspiration for the film Viceroy's HousePamela Mountbatten was born at the end of the 1920s into one of Britain's grandest families. The daughter of Lord Louis Mountbatten and his glamorous wife Edwina Ashley, she was brought up by nannies and governesses as she was often parted from her parents as they dutifully carried out their public roles. A solitary child, she learned to occupy her days lost in a book, riding or playing with the family's animals (which included at different times a honey bear, chameleons, a bush baby, two wallabies, a lion, a mongoose and a coati mundi). Her parents' vast social circle included royalty, film stars, senior service officers, politicians and celebrities. Noel Coward invited Pamela to watch him filming; Douglas Fairbanks Jr. dropped in for tea and Churchill would call for 'a word with Dickie'.After the war, Pamela truly came of age in India, while her parents were the Last Viceroy and Vicereine. This introduction to the country would start a life-long love affair with the people and the place.
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The Death of an Owl

By Paul Torday, Piers Torday
Authors:
Paul Torday, Piers Torday
From the bestselling author of Salmon Fishing in the Yemen comes a witty satire. Completed by Piers Torday.Andrew Landford, MP is driving home one night along a dark country lane when a barn owl flies into his windscreen. It is an accident, nothing more. But Andrew sits on a parliamentary committee concerned with the protection of endangered species, and the death of the owl threatens to destroy his hopes of reaching No. 10. Also in the car is Andrew's old Oxford friend and political adviser, Charles Fryerne. Will they be able to keep the crime under wraps, or will circumstances conspire against them? 'A pleasure to read' Daily Express'Skeweringly accurate' Evening Standard'A compelling blend of morality and satire' Sunday Mirror'Witty and well-crafted - a delightful gothic fantasy' Guardian
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  • Dangerous Days in Ancient Egypt

    By Terry Deary
    Authors:
    Terry Deary
    Think that Ancient Egypt is just a load of old obelisks?Don't bet your afterlife on it.Ancient Egypt should be deader than most of our yesterdays. After all it was at its height 5,000 years ago. Yet we still marvel at its mummies and ponder over its pyramids. It's easy to forget these people once lived and laughed, loved and breathed ... though not for very long.These were dangerous days for princes and peasants alike. In Ancient Egypt - a world of wars and woes, poverty and plagues - life was short. Forty was a good age to reach. A pharaoh who was eaten by a hippo ended up as dead as a ditch-digger stung by a scorpion. Unwrap the bandages and you'll find that the Egyptians' bizarre adventures in life were every bit as fascinating as the monuments they left to their deaths.
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    The Diet Myth

    By Tim Spector
    Authors:
    Tim Spector
    Why do most diets fail? Why does one person eat a certain meal and gain weight, while another eating the same meal loses pounds? Why, despite all the advice about what to eat, are we all still getting fatter?The answers are much more surprising - and fascinating - than we've been led to believe. The key to health and weight loss lies not in the latest fad diet, nor even in the simple mantra of 'eat less, exercise more', but in the microbes already inside us. Drawing on the latest science and his own pioneering research, Professor Tim Spector demystifies the common misconceptions about fat, calories, vitamins and nutrients. Only by understanding what makes our own personal microbes tick can we overcome the confusion of modern nutrition, and achieve a healthy gut and a healthy body.
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    Dark Places

    By Gillian Flynn
    Authors:
    Gillian Flynn
    HOME IS WHERE THE LIES ARE . . . Libby Day was just seven years old when her evidence put her fifteen-year-old brother behind bars. Since then, she has been drifting. But when she is contacted by a group who are convinced of Ben's innocence, Libby starts to ask questions she never fared to before. Was the voice she heard her brother's? Ben was a misfit in their small town, but was he capable of murder? Are there secrets to uncover at the family farm or is Libby deluding herself because she wants her brother back? She begins to realise that everyone in her family had something to hide that day . . . especially Ben. Now, twenty-four years later, the truth is going to be even harder to find. Who did massacre the Day family? 'Wonderful . . . eerily macabre' Guardian
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    The Danish Girl

    By David Ebershoff
    Authors:
    David Ebershoff
    The Danish Girl is now a major motion picture starring Eddie Redmayne and Alicia Vikander, directed by Tom Hooper.Loosely inspired by a true story, this tender portrait of marriage asks: What do you do when the person you love has to change?It starts with a question, a simple favour asked by a wife of her husband while both are painting in their studio, setting off a transformation neither can anticipate. Uniting fact and fiction into an original romantic vision, The Danish Girl eloquently portrays the unique intimacy that defines every marriage and the remarkable story of Lili Elbe, a pioneer in transgender history, and the woman torn between loyalty to her marriage and her own ambitions and desires. The Danish Girl is an evocative and deeply moving novel about one of the most passionate and unusual love stories of the 20th century.
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  • Dangerous Days in Elizabethan England

    By Terry Deary
    Authors:
    Terry Deary
    The reign of Elizabeth I - a Golden Age? Try asking her subjects...Elizabethans did all they could to survive in an age of sin and bling, of beddings and beheadings, galleons and guns. Explorers set sail for new worlds, risking everything to bring back slaves, gold and the priceless potato. Elizabeth lined her coffers while her subjects lived in squalor with hunger, violence and misery as bedfellows. Shakespeare shone and yet the beggars, doxies and thieves scraped and cheated to survive in the shadows. These were dangerous days. If you survived the villains, and the diseases didn't get you, then the lawmen might. Pick the wrong religion and the scaffold or stake awaited you. The toothless, red-wigged queen sparkled in her jewelled dresses, but the Golden Age was only the surface of the coin. The rest was base metal.
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    Darkness Falls from the Air

    By Nigel Balchin
    Authors:
    Nigel Balchin
    The classic novel of the London Blitz, DARKNESS FALLS FROM THE AIR captures the chaos, absurdity and ultimately the tragedy of life during the bombardment.Bill Sarratt is a civil servant working on the war effort. Thwarted at every turn by bureaucracy and the vested interests of big business, the seemingly unflappable Bill is also on the verge of losing his wife Marcia to a literary poseur named Stephen. As the bombs continue to fall, Bill must decide whether he his willing to compromise his principles and prevent his life from crumbling before his very eyes.
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    The Death of Marco Pantani

    By Matt Rendell
    Authors:
    Matt Rendell
    The intimate biography of the charismatic Tour de France winner Marco Pantani, now updated to include the 2014 and 2015 investigation into Pantani's death.National Sporting Club Book of the YearShortlisted for the William Hill Sports Book of the Year Award 'An exhaustively detailed and beautiful book . . . a fitting, ambivalent tribute - to the man, and to the dark heart of the sport he loved' IndependentOn Valentine's day 2004, Marco Pantani was found dead in a cheap hotel. It defied belief: Pantani, having won the rare double of the Giro d'Italia and the Tour de France in 1998, was regarded as the only cyclist capable of challenging Lance Armstrong's dominance. Only later did it emerge that Pantani had been addicted to cocaine since 1999.Drawing on his personal encounters with Pantani, as well as exclusive access to his psychoanalysts, and interviews with his family and friends, Matt Rendell has produced the definitive account of an iconic sporting figure.
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    The Dumpling Sisters Cookbook

    By The Dumpling Sisters, Amy Zhang, Julie Zhang
    Authors:
    The Dumpling Sisters, Amy Zhang, Julie Zhang
    Over 100 deliciously fuss-free recipes from The Dumpling Sisters' Kitchen.Amy and Julie Zhang have been entertaining and educating their thousands of followers on Youtube with their recipes for deliciously easy homemade Chinese food - now THE DUMPLING SISTERS COOKBOOK brings you more of the easy Chinese recipes and advice that those fans have been clamouring for. Dedicated to and destined to be adored by every Chinese food lover, this book is full of Chinese-food favourites, impressive sharing dishes and even sweet treats that have been little acknowledged in a western understanding of Chinese food - until now. This is Chinese home cooking at its best.The recipes are structured as to give a gradual introduction to Chinese dishes, beginning with the simple; Best Ever Fried Rice, and working up to the more elaborate Cracking Five-Spice Roast Pork Belly, and are interspersed with the insider tips and tricks that the girls' Youtube fans adore. There is also a focus on Chinese culture and eating etiquette (for perfecting those chopstick skills), including sharing menu planner and a guide to shopping at the Chinese supermarket. Amy and Julie write with wit and gusto - they are the perfect cooks to take any food lover on a journey to discover real Chinese cooking.
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  • Dangerous Days on the Victorian Railways

    By Terry Deary
    Authors:
    Terry Deary
    The Victorians risked more than just delays when boarding a steam train . . .Victorian inventors certainly didn't lack steam, but while they squabbled over who deserved the title of 'The Father of the Locomotive' and enjoyed their fame and fortune, safety on the rails was not their priority. Brakes were seen as a needless luxury and boilers had an inconvenient tendency to overheat and explode, and in turn, blow up anyone in reach.Often recognised as having revolutionised travel and industrial Britain, Victorian railways were perilous. Disease, accidents and disasters accounted for thousands of deaths and many more injuries. While history has focused on the triumph of engineers, the victims of the Victorian railways had names, lives and families and they deserve to be remembered . . .
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