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Yorkshire

By Richard Morris
Authors:
Richard Morris
Yorkshire, it has been said, is 'a continent unto itself', a region where mountain, plain, coast, downs, fen and heath lie close. By weaving history, family stories, travelogue and ecology, Richard Morris reveals how Yorkshire took shape as a landscape and in literature, legend and popular regard.We descend into the county's netherworld of caves and mines, and face episodes at once brave and dark, such as the part played by Whitby and Hull in emptying Arctic waters of whales, or the re-routing of rivers and destruction of Yorkshire's fens. We are introduced to discoverers and inventions, meet the people who came and went, encounter real and fabled heroes, and discover why, from the Iron Age to the Cold War, Yorkshire has been such a key place in times of tension and struggle.In a wide-ranging and lyrical narrative, Morris finds that for as far back as we can look Yorkshire has been a region of unique presence with links around the world.
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Things I Have Drawn

By Tom Curtis
Authors:
Tom Curtis
Perfect funny stocking-filler gift for fans of the Instagram sensation THINGS I HAVE DRAWN. KIDS' DRAWINGS HILARIOUSLY BROUGHT TO LIFE. *****Have you ever wondered what the world would look like if children's drawings were real?Wonder no more. Global Instagram sensation THINGS I HAVE DRAWN does just that - and the results are AMAZING.8-year-old Dom and 6-year-old Al are brothers who love to doodle, and then Dad Tom painstakingly transforms their creations into photorealistic scenes. Join the family on a trip to the zoo and laugh your socks off at all of the weird and wonderful creatures, including a gurning goat, a terrifying polar bear and a rather smug looking flamingo. Spectacularly funny and slightly disturbing, this book is packed with previously unseen material and the brilliant before-and-after images that have made @thingsihavedrawn such a cult hit.
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Kung Fu Hero and The Forbidden City

By Deji Olatunji aka ComedyShortsGamer
Authors:
Deji Olatunji aka ComedyShortsGamer
*A fun-packed badass graphic novel adventure by YouTube sensation, ComedyShortsGamer, for fans of The Sidemen and DanTDM.* IT WAS ONLY MEANT TO BE A PRANK VIDEO... But now DEJI (AKA ComedyShortsGamer) has unleashed the forces of evil in Beijing's Forbidden City.Armed with nothing more than bravado and a talking dog, Deji must return a stolen dragon goblet to the tomb of the mighty Emperor before dawn, or face the end of the world!Standing in his way are gangs of triads, wild dog statues brought to life and skeleton ghosts, not to mention his startling ability to snatch defeat from the jaws of victory.But if Deji is going to survive the night he must triumph over his greatest foe of all, his brother, KSI.Can Deji overcome years of being a slacker and become a kung fu hero to save a world? Join him on his hilarious quest to prove to his parents that a lifetime playing Tekken wasn't a waste of time.
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Why Does Asparagus Make Your Wee Smell?

By Andy Brunning
Authors:
Andy Brunning
Why does cooking bacon smell so good? Can cheese really give you bad dreams? Why do onions make you cry? Find out the answers in this illustrated compendium of amazing and easy-to-understand chemistry. Featuring 58 different questions, you will discover all sorts of wonderful science that affects us on daily basis. Andy Brunning opens up the chemical world behind the sensations we experience through food and drink - popping candy, hangovers, spicy chillies and many more. Exploring the aromas, flavours and bodily reactions with beautiful infographics and explanations, WHY DOES ASPARAGUS MAKE YOUR WEE SMELL? is guaranteed to satisfy curious minds. And did you know that nutmeg can make you hallucinate? Prepare to be astounded by chemical breakdown like never before.
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  • The Pattern On The Stone

    By Daniel Hillis
    Authors:
    Daniel Hillis
    Will computers become thinking machines? A scientist at the cutting-edge of current research gives his provocative analysis.The world was shocked when a computer, Deep Blue defeated Gary Kasparov, arguably the greatest human chess player ever to have lived. This remarkable victory, and other, more day-to-day innovations, beg serious questions: what are the limits of what computers can do? Can they think? Do they learn?Discussions of these questions tend to get muddled because most people have only the vaguest idea of how computers actually work. This book explains the inner workings of computers in a way that does not require a profound knowledge of mathematics nor an understanding of electrical engineering. Starting with an account of how computers are built and why they work, W. Daniel Hillis describes what they can and cannot do - at the present time - before explaining how a computer can surpass its programmer and, finally, where humanity has reached in its quest for a true Thinking Machine.
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    Guide To The Architecture Of London

    By Edward Jones, Christopher Woodward
    Authors:
    Edward Jones, Christopher Woodward
    'The definitive guide to London's architecture' INDEPENDENT London has an unrivalled richness of architecture, from its squares and houses to its palaces and churches. This is the only guide to cover all of London's building history, from its Roman foundation to the massive expansion of the 19th century which made London the largest city on earth.
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    The Lost Gardens Of Heligan

    By Tim Smit
    Authors:
    Tim Smit
    The glorious No.1 bestsellerUntil the First World War, the estate gardens at Heligan were one of the glories of Cornwall. Thereafter, through growing neglect, they slipped gradually to sleep. This is the amazing story of their rediscovery and restoration, or the Victorian vision and ingenuity which first created that subtropical paradise, and of the modern obsession and improvisation which recreated it.
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    Traditional Buildings of Britain

    By R.W. Brunskill
    Authors:
    R.W. Brunskill
    The third edition contains a completely new and exciting chapter on the Vernacular Revival, which carries the story forward from the nineteenth to the late twentieth century, and is illustrated with Dr Brunskill's fine drawings, a feature of the books since the original publication. In addition, the Bibliography has been brought up to date, the Preface has been revised and a number of photographs have been replaced.
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    Timber Building in Britain

    By R.W. Brunskill
    Authors:
    R.W. Brunskill
    Timber Building in Britain is divided into four sections, the first of which deals with cruck construction, box-frame and post-and-truss assembling and the problems of roof construction and concludes with flooring, partitions and the decorative work applied to timber. Part Two comprises a remarkable illustrated glossary covering terms used in all types of timber construction work, with the descriptions backed up with excellent drawings and photographs. Part Three, the chronological survey of timber buildings from Saxon times to the nineteenth century, contains notes on the forty-seven photographs of building types represented. Finally, Part Four deals with regional variations in timber building and is supplemented by six distribution maps. Notes and References and a substantial Bibliography complete the book.

    Traditional Buildings of Cumbria

    By R.W. Brunskill
    Authors:
    R.W. Brunskill
    Many people living in and visiting the Lake District are charmed by the traditional buildings that accentuate the landscape. This book introduces the traditional houses, barns, watermills and chapels of the Lake District and the surrounding hills and valleys that make up the county of Cumbria. With the aid of hundreds of photographs, drawings and diagrams, the author explains how the building types have developed over the centuries and how the indigenous building materials of stone, clay, brick and slate have been used to create works of vernacular architecture which seem to grow out of the surrounding landscape.

    Building Basics: Doors and Entryways

    By William P Spence
    Authors:
    William P Spence
    The challenge is to select just the right style that reflects the feeling you want to create for visitors, passers by and yourself. Start by making sure your door is in the right location. Then get helpful tips on drawing plans for the entire entryway including door, side windows, foyer and lighting. Factor in practical needs like energy efficiency, durability of material, security, the amount of light that you want, the type of hardware that fits the best. Finally there are issues of blending aesthetics (colour schemes and planting), night illumination, privacy, and security. Now you¿re ready to follow the instructions for buying materials and installation. Other doorways also get special chapters, from patios to garage entries, storage areas, and entries to workshops and studies.

    Junk Chic

    By Kathryn Elliott
    Authors:
    Kathryn Elliott
    Thrift stores, flea markets, basements, and attics offer plenty of inexpensive ¿ or even free materials that, with a little imagination and transformation, can become exquisite decorative items.But do you feel at a loss when you look at that battered table, those surplus chairs or those seemingly past-their-prime decorative objects? Dozens of beautiful and unique projects provide the answer to you quandary with a wealth of inspiration and how-to guidance.So, instead of regretfully passing by that bargain, you¿ll eagerly apply painted finishes and other craft techniques to bring out the hidden beauty in almost any kind of furniture and accent pieces. Discarded wooden cupboard doors give a boring hallway new life as a Secrete Garden., and pair of beaten-up lamps become living room accessories. Recycle an old trunk by making it into a table. Re-upholster outdated chairs with the magic of a glue gun and some fabric.

    Tattered Treasures

    By Lauren Powell
    Authors:
    Lauren Powell
    Enjoy your treasured collections, favourite items and must-have finds. Create crackle and distressed finishes to ¿age¿ furniture. Use an old chair as a display stand for a special object. Artfully arrange a collection of interesting bottles. Wrap a small gift in a lovely vintage handkerchief. Recycle broken pieces of treasured china into a china-shard mosaic table. Embellish a basket to make an eye-catching centrepiece, or update a lamp with a fabric cover. An empty portrait frame can become a unique corkboard, and an old fireplace screen gets a new life with a stencilled design..