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The Boys: Triumph Over Adversity

By Martin Gilbert
Authors:
Martin Gilbert
In August 1945, the first of 732 child survivors of the Holocaust reached Britain. First settled in the Lake District, they formed a tightly knit group of friends whose terrible shared experience is almost beyond imagining. This is their story, which begins in the lost communities of pre-World War II central Europe, moves through ghetto, concentration camp and death march, to liberation, survival, and finally, fifty years later, a deeply moving reunion. Martin Gilbert has brought together the recollections of this remarkable group of survivors. With magisterial narration, he tells their astonishing stories. The Boys bears witness to the human spirit, enduring the depths, and bearing hopefully the burden and challenge of survival.'Martin Gilbert is to be congratulated on producing a masterly and deeply moving tribute to those who had the courage and luck to survive' Literary Review
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Blood and Silk

By Michael Vatikiotis
Authors:
Michael Vatikiotis
'A lively and learned guide to the politics, personalities and conflicts that are shaping a dynamic group of countries' FINANCIAL TIMES'A fascinating and many-layered portrait of Southeast Asia' THANT MYINT-UThought-provoking and eye-opening, BLOOD AND SILK is an accessible, personal look at modern Southeast Asia, written by one of the region's most experienced outside observers. This is a first-hand account of what it's like to sit at the table with deadly Thai Muslim insurgents, mediate between warring clans in the Southern Philippines and console the victims of political violence in Indonesia - all in an effort to negotiate peace, and understand the reasons behind endemic violence.Peering beyond brand new shopping malls and shiny glass towers in Bangkok and Jakarta, Michael Vatikiotis probes the heart of modern Southeast Asia. Why are the region's richest countries such as Malaysia riddled with corruption? Why do Myanmar, Thailand and the Philippines harbour unresolved violent insurgencies? How do deepening religious divisions in Indonesia and Malaysia and China's growing influence affect the region and the rest of the world?Vatikiotis tells the story of modern Southeast Asia using vivid portraits of the personalities who pull the strings, mixed with revealing analysis that is underpinned by decades of experience in the countries involved, from their silk-sheathed salons to blood-spattered streets. The result is a fascinating study of the dynamics of power and conflict in one of the world's fastest growing regions.
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Blood and Fears

By Kevin Wilson
Authors:
Kevin Wilson
How America's bomber boys and girls in England won their war, and how their English allies responded to them.In this comprehensive history, Kevin Wilson allows the young men of the US 8th Air Force based in Britain during the Second World War to tell their stories of blood and heroism in their own words. He also reveals the lives of the Women's Army Corps and Red Cross girls who served in England with them. Drawing on first-hand accounts, Wilson brings to life the ebullient Americans' interactions with their British counterparts, and unveils surprising stories of humanity and heartbreak.Thanks to America's bomber boys and girls, life in Britain would never be the same again.
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The Broken Ladder

By Keith Payne
Authors:
Keith Payne
Inequality is at a level that has not been seen in our lifetimes, yet the disparity between rich and poor has ramifications that extend far beyond mere financial means. THE BROKEN LADDER tells the story of inequality and its impact on everything from our thinking to our mood and our health.Feeling poor matters - not just being poor. It affects how we make decisions, how our immune systems function and even how we view moral concepts like justice and fairness. Regardless of their average incomes, countries or states with greater levels of income inequality have much higher rates of all the social maladies we associate with poverty: lower than average life expectancy, mental illness and crime.Using groundbreaking research in psychology and neuroscience, Keith Payne explores such issues as why women in poor societies often have more children and why they have them at a younger age; why people's perception of their social status affects their political beliefs; how poverty raises stress levels as much as physical threats; how inequality in the workplace affects performance; and why unequal societies tend to become more religious. Replete with insights and illuminating examples, THE BROKEN LADDER outlines the steps we can take to get off the endless treadmill of social comparison.
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The Big Fat Activity Book for Pregnant People

By Jordan Reid, Erin Williams
Authors:
Jordan Reid, Erin Williams
THE PERFECT GIFT FOR MUMS-TO-BE WITH A SENSE OF HUMOUR.Part diary, part colouring book, and part brutally honest (and hysterically funny) collection of advice, this is for the new mother who wants to chill out, laugh her face off, and realise with every page that she is not alone.Two stars of the lifestyle and parenting blogosphere invoke the mindless fun and nostalgic appeal of an old-school activity book in this irreverent, laugh-out-loud twist on the traditional baby journal, with illustrated activities, lists, essays, and musings on what pregnancy is really like. - Wordsearches: Nope, Sorry (All the Stuff You're Not Allowed to Have Anymore); Bad Baby Names- Mazes: Make it from Your Desk to the Bathroom Without Throwing Up- Lists: How to Baby Shop Without Crying- Advice: Yoga Teachers (Also Your Mum Friends, Your Parents, People on Facebook, All Articles, and Everyone You Meet) Want to Tell You How to Give Birth, But You Don t Have to Listen- Quizzes: Stop: Labour Time!
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Boom

By Russell Miller
Authors:
Russell Miller
Hugh 'Boom' Trenchard was embarrassed by being described as 'The Father of the Royal Air Force' - he thought others were more deserving. But the reality was that no man did more to establish the world's first independent air force and ensure its survival in the teeth of fierce opposition from both the Admiralty and the War Office. Born in Taunton in 1873, Trenchard struggled at school, not helped by the shame of his solicitor father's bankruptcy when he was sixteen. He failed entrance examinations to both the Royal Navy and the Army several times, eventually obtaining a commission through the 'back door' of the militia. After service in India, South Africa - where he was seriously wounded - and Nigeria, he found his destiny when he joined the fledgling Royal Flying Corps in 1912, where he was soon known as 'Boom' thanks to his stentorian voice. Quick to recognise the huge potential aircraft offered in future conflicts, he rose rapidly to command the RFC in France during the First World War despite handicaps that would have blighted conventional military careers: he was obstinate, tactless, inarticulate and chronically unable to remember names - yet he was able to inspire unflagging loyalty among all ranks. Despite his conspicuous distrust of politicians, he served as a successful Chief of the Air Staff for a decade after the war and then, at the personal request of the King, took over as Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police, which he reorganised and reformed. He never wavered in his belief that mastery of the air could only be achieved by relentless offensive action, or in his determined advocacy of strategic bombing. His most enduring legacy was the creation of the finest air force in the world, engendered with the spirit that won the Battle of Britain.
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Beneath The Dardanelles

By Vecihi Basarin
Authors:
Vecihi Basarin
In the Australian psyche, the Gallipoli campaign is the action on Gallipoli Peninsula. But an important addition to that land campaign was the part played by the Australian submarine HMAS AE2. The AE2 achieved a daring passage through the Dardanelles on 25 April 1915 when Anzac troops were landing on the other side at Anzac Cove. The Royal and French navies' previous attempts at passage had ended in disaster. AE2's mission to 'run amuck' ended after five days in the Sea of Marmara when it was caught by the Turkish Sultanhisar torpedo boat. After being holed, AE2's captain Stoker scuttled the submarine and its crew were saved by Sultanhisar's captain, Ali Riza. Beneath the Dardanelles tells AE2's story from both the Australian and Turkish perspectives, and features extracts from the memoirs of the two captains. Rarely in military books are both sides of a battle presented so evenly. The submarine lay undiscovered on the bottom of the sea until 1998 and awaits its destiny as the largest historical Australian relic of the Gallipoli campaign. The future of AE2 will be newsworthy for years to come and this book makes an important contribution to that story.
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Bravest

By Robert Macklin
Authors:
Robert Macklin
The Victoria Cross is the highest award for valour that can be won by an Australian; just 96 Australians have been awarded the VC in conflicts from the Boer War to the Vietnam War. And only fourteen Australians have been awarded the George Cross, the ultimate medal for heroism away from active combat, since its inception in 1940. But what is it that makes these remarkable soldiers risk everything in defence of their country and their mates? Noted biographer Robert Macklin tells the inspirational story of fifteen Australian recipients of the Victoria and George Crosses, from Neville Howse in South Africa in 1900 to the heroes of the Great War such as Albert Jacka, 'Diver' Derrick in the Second World War, and Keith Payne in Vietnam in 1969.'An excellent book on a subject that has understandably retained public interest over the years.' - Steve Gower, Director, Australian War Memorial.
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By Tank into Normandy

By Stuart Hills
Authors:
Stuart Hills
'One of the best half-dozen personal accounts of the Normandy campaign' - Richard HolmesStuart Hills embarked his Sherman DD tank on to an LCT at 6.45 a.m., Sunday 4 June 1944. He was 20 years old, unblooded, fresh from a public-school background and Officer Cadet training. He was going to war. Two days later, his tank sunk, he and his crew landed from a rubber dinghy with just the clothes they stood in. After that, the struggles through the Normandy bocage in a replacement tank (of the non-swimming variety), engaging the enemy in a constant round of close encounters, led to a swift mastering of the art of tank warfare and remarkable survival in the midst of carnage and destruction. His story of that journey through hell to victory makes for compulsive reading.
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Backfire

By Alan Clark
Authors:
Alan Clark
Alan Clark's passion for cars - that he bought, drove and wrote about over 50 yearsAlan Clark was passionate about cars from an early age. He bought his first car - a secondhand 6.5 litre Bentley - while still a schoolboy at Eton and without a driving licence. By the time he was 24 he had been banned from driving three times, not only for speeding but in one instance for driving an open Buick Roadster with a girl on his lap. He dealt in 'classic' and vintage cars and soon built up an impressive stable of his own. One of his first published pieces of journalism appeared in the US magazine, Road and Track, for which he was briefly UK correspondent. BACK FIRE, the title of a column he wrote in Thoroughbred and Classic Cars magazine, ran for three years until his death in September 1999. Alan Clark's elder son, James Clark - who has inherited his father's motoring enthusiasms - provides a Prologue; Alan Clark's widow Jane writes a moving Afterword.
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