Related to: 'The Tabit Genesis'

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Gollancz

Eve: Templar One

Tony Gonzales
Authors:
Tony Gonzales
Gollancz

Eve

Tony Gonzales
Authors:
Tony Gonzales

A man wakes, trapped inside a cloning vat. He has no idea how he got there, no idea where he is, and no idea who he is. But someone is trying to kill him, and they're about to succeed ...A disgraced Foreign ambassador leaves his post humiliated, and ignored by his superiors, only to meet Ameline - a woman who seems to know everything about him, and an alarming amount about a conspiracy to overthrow the government.And on a back-water world during an economic crisis a worker called Tibus Heth leads a revolt against the corporation which earns him an unexpected and mysterious ally with astounding influence, and an inclination to aid his revolutionary ideas ...

C. Robert Cargill

Cargill wrote for Ain't it Cool News for nearly 10 years under the pseudonym Massawyrm, as well as serving as a staff writer for Film.com and Hollywood.com. He appears as the animated character Carlyle on spill.com, where he also hosts a featured podcast. His first screenplay, the critically acclaimed SINISTER, was co-written and directed by Scott Derrickson and starred Ethan Hawke. He recently co-wrote the screenplay for Marvel's DOCTOR STRANGE.

Charlaine Harris

CHARLAINE HARRIS is a New York Times bestselling author who has been writing for over thirty-five years. Born and raised in the Mississippi Delta, she is the author of the Aurora Teagarden mysteries, basis for the Hallmark Movies & Mysteries Aurora Teagarden original movies; the Midnight, Texas series, now a brand-new TV series; the Sookie Stackhouse urban fantasy series, basis for the HBO show True Blood; the Lily Bard mysteries; the Harper Connelly mysteries; and the co-author of the graphic novel trilogy Cemetery Girl. Harris now lives in Texas with her husband and two rescue dogs.

Charles John Cutcliffe Wright Hyne

Charles John Cutcliffe Wright Hyne (11 May 1866 - 10 March 1944) was an English novelist who was also known by the pen name Weatherby Chesney. He is perhaps best remembered as the author of The Lost Continent: The Story of Atlantis. He is also remembered for his Captain Kettle stories and for The Recipe for Diamonds.

Daniel Keyes

Daniel Keyes (1927-2014) Daniel Keyes was born in Brooklyn in 1927, and worked as a merchant seaman, editor and university English lecturer. He won the Hugo Award in 1960 for the short story that FLOWERS FOR ALGERNON was based on and the Nebula in 1966 for the full-length novel. In 1968 FLOWERS FOR ALGERNON became the Oscar-winning film CHARLY and has now sold over five million copies worldwide. He died in June 2014.

Donald Suddaby

Donald Suddaby (1900-1964)Donald Suddaby, born in Leeds, was a British author and prolific writer of children's books. His first work was Scarlet-Dragon: A Little Chinese Phantasy, published in 1923. Suddaby began publishing works of genre interest under the name of Alan Griff with stories like "The Emerald" in August 1930 and "The Coming of Glugm" in September 1930, both for Colour. His first sf novel was Lost Men in the Grass (1940), also as by Griff. He died in 1964.

E. R. Eddison

E R Eddison (1882-1945)Eric Rucker Eddison was born in Leeds in 1882 and was schooled by private tutors along with a young Arthur Ransome. He was later educated at Eton and Oxford, becoming a high-ranking British civil servant. His earlier 20th-century novels - most famously The Worm Ouroboros - influenced many of the great fantasy writers who followed him, such as JRR Tolkien, Ursula K. LeGuin and Michael Moorcock. After retiring from the civil service, he lived in Marlborough, Wiltshire until his death in 1945.

Garrett P. Serviss

Garrett Putman Serviss (1851-1929)Garrett Putman Serviss was an American astronomer and early science fiction writer. He was born in upstate New York and majored in science at Cornell University. He also studied law at Columbia University although he never worked as an attorney, instead becoming a journalist for The New York Sun in 1876. At the end of 1897, Serviss was commissioned to write an unofficial sequel to an equally unofficial 1897 revision of H. G. Wells' The War of the Worlds which set the action in America. Edison's Conquest of Mars first appeared in the New York Evening Journal as "The Conquest of Mars".For more information see http://sf-encyclopedia.com/entry/serviss_garrett_p

Gavin G. Smith

Gavin G. Smith is the Dundee-born author of the hard edged, action-packed SF novels Veteran, War in Heaven, Age of Scorpio, A Quantum Mythology and The Beauty of Destruction, as well as the short story collection Crysis: Escalation. He has collaborated with Stephen Deas as the composite personality Gavin Deas and co-written Elite: Wanted, and the shared world series Empires: Infiltration and Empires: Extraction.

John Adams

John Adams is a pseudonym for John Glasby.

John Gribbin

John Gribbin is a British science writer, astrophysicist and visiting fellow in astronomy at the University of Sussex, where he graduated with a BA in physics in 1966 and did his master of science (MSc) in 1967. He earned his PhD in astrophysics from the University of Cambridge in 1971. Author of the well-known IN SEARCH OF SCHRODINGER'S CAT, Gribbin's work as a scientist is often reflected in his writing which covers a wide range of topics, such as quantum physics, human evolution, the origins of the universe, climate change and global warming.

Jonathan Burke

Jonathan Burke (1922 - 2011)Jonathan Burke was the working name of English writer John Frederick Burke, who also wrote SF and fantasy under his own name (particularly his short fiction) as well as J F Burke and Robert Miall. Burke was born in Rye, Sussex, but soon moved to Liverpool, where his father was a Chief Inspec­tor of Police. He became a prominent science fiction fan in the late 1930s, and with David Mcllwain he jointly edited one of the earliest British fanzines. The Satellite, to which another close friend, Sam Youd, was a leading contributor. All three men would become well-known SF novelists after the war, writing as Jonathan Burke, Charles Eric Maine, and John Christopher, respectively.During the early 1950s he wrote numerous science fiction adventure novels and his short stories appeared regularly in all of the leading SF magazines, most notably in New Worlds and Authentic Science Fiction. In the mid-1950s he worked in publishing and as a public relations executive for Shell, before being appointed as European Story Editor for 20th Century-Fox Productions in 1963.His cinematic expertise led to his being commissioned to pen dozens of bestselling novelizations of popular film and TV titles, ranging from such movies as A Hard Day's Night, Privilege, numerous Hammer Horror films, and The Bill. He also did adaptations of Gerry Anderson's UFO TV series (as Robert Miall). Burke went on to write more than 150 books in all genres, including work in collaboration with his wife, Jean; and also published non-fiction works on an astonishing variety of subjects, most notably music.After finally settling in the Scottish countryside. Burke continued to write well into his eighth decade, and in later years many of his best supernatural and macabre short stories were collected and anthologized. He died on 21 September 201l, aged 89, shortly after completing his final novel, a contemporary supernatural thriller The Nightmare Whisperers, which was published posthumously in 2012.

Justina Robson

Justina Robson is an Arthur C. Clarke shortlisted author of ten SFF novels, including the highly regarded Quantum Gravity series, and was one of the first writers to win amazon.co.uk's Writer's Bursary in 2000. Based in Leeds, she's been shortlisted for multiple international awards and is a sought-after creative writing teacher who has taught at the Arvon Foundation. A graduate of the Clarion West workshops in Seattle (1996) she has been invited to teach there also, though she hasn't made it yet for various practical reasons. She acted as a judge for the Arthur C Clarke awards on behalf of the Science Fiction Foundation in 2006. Her most recently published novel is Glorious Angels, shortlisted for the British Science Fiction Association Best Novel 2015. You can learn more at justinarobson.co.uk or by following @JustinaRobson on Twitter.

Kate Wilhelm

Kate Wilhelm (1928-2018) Working name of the US writer Katie Gertrude Meridith Wilhelm Knight, born in Ohio in 1928. She started publishing SF in 1956 with 'The Pint-Sized Genie' for Fantastic, and continued for some time with relatively straightforward genre stories; it was not until the late 1960s that she began to release the mature stories which have made her reputation as one of the 20th century's finest SF writers. She was married to noted author and critic Damon Knight and together they have had a profound influence beyond their writing, through the Milford Science Fiction Writers' Conference and its offshoot, in which she was directly involved, the Clarion Science Fiction Writers' Workshop. She won the Hugo Award for Best Novel with Where Late the Sweet Birds Sang, and has won the Nebula Award three times. Kate Wilhelm died in 2018, aged 89.

Katherine MacLean

Katherine MacLean (1925- )Katherine Anne MacLean is an American science fiction writer best known for her short stories of the 1950s. Born in Glen Ridge, New Jersey, MacLean received a BA in economics from Barnard College, New York, and did postgraduate study in psychology. Her first published short story was "Defense Mechanism", which appeared in Astounding in October 1949. Over the decades MacLean has continued to write whilst being employed in a wide variety of jobs - as book reviewer, economic graphanalyst, editor, EKG technician, food analyst, laboratory technician in penicillin research, nurse's aide, office manager and payroll bookkeeper, photographer and pollster, to name a few. Much of her later work features psi powers as a central theme.

Keith Laumer

Keith Laumer (1925-1993)John Keith Laumer was an American science fiction author born in Syracuse, New York. Prior to his career as a writer, Laumer was an officer in the United States Air Force. After war service, he spent a year at the University of Stockholm, and then took two bachelor's degrees in science and architecture at the University of Illinois. His first story, Greylorn, was published in 1959, but he returned to the Air Force the following year, only becoming a full-time writer in 1965. Laumer was extremely prolific and produced three major series and two minor ones, along with a number of independent novels. After 1973, however, illness meant that he published more sparingly. He died in 1993.

Kobna Holdbrook-Smith

Kobna Holdbrook-Smith is a film, television, theatre and voice actor. During his career he has voiced many books including all of Ben Aaronovitch's best-selling Nightingale and Grant series, many BBC and independent radio plays and one or two lifts. On stage he has played leads at the National, Royal Court, Young Vic, Royal Exchange and Tricycle theatres and most recently was Ike turner in the original West End production of Tina Turner the Musical and Laertes in Hamlet at the Barbican Theatre, opposite Benedict Cumberbatch. Films include: Mary Poppins Returns, Dr. Strange, Justice League, Paddington 2, The Commuter, Ghost Stories, Gwen and The Double. TV includes: The Split, Dark Heart, Class, Capital, The Last Panthers, Sirens and Little Britain. Kobna is also a trustee of the children's education charity Dramatic Need, and an associate director of the National Theatre.

Kristen Ciccarelli

Kristen Ciccarelli (@SheLuresDragons) hails from Ontario's Niagara Peninsula where she grew up on her grandfather's grape farm. She's made her living as a baker, a bookseller, and a potter, but now writes YA fantasy books about bloodthirsty dragons, girls wielding really cool weapons, and the transformative power of stories.You can learn more at www.kristenciccarelli.com

Lawrence Watt-Evans

Lawrence Watt-Evans (1954- )Lawrence Watt-Evans is the working name of American science fiction and fantasy writer Lawrence Watt Evans. He was born in Arlington, Massachusetts, as the fourth of six children and studied at Bedford High School and Princeton University, although he left the latter without a degree. Watt-Evans began publishing sf in 1975 with "Paranoid Fantasy #1" for American Athiest. He has constructed several scripts for Marvel Comics and has been moderately prolific as a short story writer, with "Why I Left Harry's All-Night Hamburgers" (Asimov's, July 1987) won a 1988 Hugo.