Related to: 'The Smoke'

Gollancz

Headlong

Simon Ings
Authors:
Simon Ings
Gollancz

Painkillers

Simon Ings
Authors:
Simon Ings

A mysterious box that he cannot open is all that might save Adam's autistic son as they are plunged into a world of old corruptions and new terrors.In PAINKILLERS, Simon Ings deftly teases out his knotted story that, with its many conventional elements, could have run a risk of overfamiliarity: sinister Oriental Triad gangsters, their even more sinister wives, a speedy Hong Kong with its ruthless Brit yuppies and its nightlife ridden with drugs, strange sex and violence. Shooting back and forth between a glamorous Hong Kong, in 1990, and a straitened London, in 1998, Ings sustains suspense by dropping hints but never telling enough.Adam Wyatt and his wife Eva run a small café near Southwark Market. They bicker a lot, Adam drinks and visits to their autistic son Justin tend to go awry. But underneath Adam's drinking are secrets from their previous life in Hong Kong, when he worked for the Independent Commission Against Corruption and got in with some very dubious local society types; one of whom includes 'Call me Jimmy' Yao Sau-Lan, 'a big nasty man, in a big nasty suit', whose father just happened to kill Eva's grandfather. When Jimmy's widow and sons come calling, Adam knows he's in trouble.

Gollancz

City of the Iron Fish

Simon Ings
Authors:
Simon Ings

Simon Ings has written a surreal adventure probing the very fabric of existence, tearing it open to reveal a sometimes horrifying world within. It is a work that will delight any fan of China Mieville.Only a fool would question the strange magics that maintain the cool haven of the City of the Iron Fish in the middle of an inferno of scorching heat and splintered rock, for the well-watered streets of the city hide secrets in their shadows.Thomas Kemp is just such a fool ...And embarks on a journey that will take him to the limits of reality. It may kill him, worse, that may not be enough. Especially as it is his only friend, Blythe, who may discover the secret of the city's isolation.

Gollancz

Hotwire

Simon Ings
Authors:
Simon Ings

A fast-moving cyberpunk thriller set in a world of thinking cities, ruthless corporations and mad orbital AIs. A novel that links the groundbreaking works of William Gibson to the new generation of writers such as Charlie Stross and Hannu Rajaniemi.Ajay had a future once, birthing intelligent cities for the Haag Agency. First Delhi, then Milan. But then he is seduced into betraying his employers and finds himself working for a city that wishes to become human.Ajay must steal some rare technology from a long-dead wetware expert, a new Frankenstein called Snow, a man now alive in an AI. A man who wants a new toy for his manufactured daughter ...

Gollancz

Hot Head

Simon Ings
Authors:
Simon Ings
Gollancz

Wolves

Simon Ings
Authors:
Simon Ings

The new novel from Simon Ings is a story that balances on the knife blade of a new technology. Augmented Reality uses computing power to overlay a digital imagined reality over the real world. Whether it be adverts or imagined buildings and imagined people, with Augmented Reality the world is no longer as it appears to you, it is as it is imagined by someone else. Two friends are working at the cutting edge of this technology and when they are offered backing to take the idea and make it into the next global entertainment they realise that wolves hunt in this imagined world. And the wolves might be them.A story about technology becomes a personal quest into a changed world and the pursuit of a secret from the past. A secret about a missing mother, a secret that could hide a murder. This is no dry analysis of how a technology might change us, it is a terrifying thriller, a picture of a dark tomorrow that is just around the corner. Ings takes the satire and mordant satirical view of J.G. Ballard and propels it into the 21st century.

Daniel Keyes

Daniel Keyes (1927-2014) Daniel Keyes was born in Brooklyn in 1927, and worked as a merchant seaman, editor and university English lecturer. He won the Hugo Award in 1960 for the short story that FLOWERS FOR ALGERNON was based on and the Nebula in 1966 for the full-length novel. In 1968 FLOWERS FOR ALGERNON became the Oscar-winning film CHARLY and has now sold over five million copies worldwide. He died in June 2014.

Edgar Allan Poe

Edgar Allan Poe was an American writer, editor, and literary critic. Poe is best known for his poetry and short stories such as THE FALL OF THE HOUSE OF USHER.

Geoffrey Household

Geoffrey Household was a prolific novelist of political thrillers and suspense stories, most notably the classic ROGUE MALE, which, THE TIMES recently declared, 'remains as exciting and probing as ever'. He was as widely travelled as the settings of his books suggest: after graduating from Magdalen College, Oxford, with a first in English literature he worked abroad for twenty-five years, and served in British Intelligence during World War Two in Greece and the Middle East. He married twice and eventually settled in the English countryside with his wife and three children.

John Gribbin

John Gribbin is a British science writer, astrophysicist and visiting fellow in astronomy at the University of Sussex, where he graduated with a BA in physics in 1966 and did his master of science (MSc) in 1967. He earned his PhD in astrophysics from the University of Cambridge in 1971. Author of the well-known IN SEARCH OF SCHRODINGER'S CAT, Gribbin's work as a scientist is often reflected in his writing which covers a wide range of topics, such as quantum physics, human evolution, the origins of the universe, climate change and global warming.

Kei Miller

Kei Miller was born in Jamaica in 1978. He is the author of three novels, THE SAME EARTH, THE LAST WARNER WOMAN and AUGUSTOWN, several collections of poetry and a book of short stories, THE FEAR OF STONES, which was shortlisted for the Commonwealth Writers' Prize for Best First Book. In 2014, he won the prestigious Forward Prize for Poetry for his collection, THE CARTOGRAPHER TRIES TO MAP A WAY TO ZION. He teaches Creative Writing at Royal Holloway, University of London.

Ken Grimwood

KEN GRIMWOOD (1944-2003) was a radio journalist in California. He was the author of Breakthrough, Elise, The Voice Outside and Into the Deep. He won the World Fantasy Award for Replay.

Kerry Reichs

Kerry Reichs is a native of Charlotte, North Carolina. She is a graduate of Oberlin College, Duke University School of Law and Sanford Institute of Public Policy. Kerry practiced law in Washington, DC for six years prior to settling down to write novels. She currently lives in DC and Los Angeles. Kerry has been a maid of honour five times, a bridesmaid five times and a reader twice. She has never been married.

Kristen Ciccarelli

Kristen Ciccarelli (@SheLuresDragons) hails from Ontario's Niagara Peninsula where she grew up on her grandfather's grape farm. She's made her living as a baker, a bookseller, and a potter, but now writes YA fantasy books about bloodthirsty dragons, girls wielding really cool weapons, and the transformative power of stories.You can learn more at www.kristenciccarelli.com

Lawrence Watt-Evans

Lawrence Watt-Evans (1954- )Lawrence Watt-Evans is the working name of American science fiction and fantasy writer Lawrence Watt Evans. He was born in Arlington, Massachusetts, as the fourth of six children and studied at Bedford High School and Princeton University, although he left the latter without a degree. Watt-Evans began publishing sf in 1975 with "Paranoid Fantasy #1" for American Athiest. He has constructed several scripts for Marvel Comics and has been moderately prolific as a short story writer, with "Why I Left Harry's All-Night Hamburgers" (Asimov's, July 1987) won a 1988 Hugo.

Lezanne Clannachan

Lezanne Clannachan was born in Denmark before moving to England when she was fourteen. After university, she lived in Singapore for several years before moving to London to work in marketing and event management. Lezanne has three children and lives in West Sussex.

Maggie Hartley

Maggie Hartley has fostered more than 300 children while being a foster carer for over twenty years. Taking on the children other carers often can't cope with, Maggie helps children that are deemed 'unadoptable' because of their behaviour or the extreme trauma that they've been through. She's looked after refugees, supported children through sexual abuse and violence court cases, cared for teenagers on remand and taught young mums how to parent their newborn babies.

Margaret St Clair

Margaret St Clair (1911-1995)Margaret St Clair was an American science fiction writer who wrote mostly under her own name, but published a number of titles under the pseudonyms Idris Seabright and Wilton Hazzard. Born in Hutchinson, Kansas, St Clair had no siblings and recalled her childhood as 'rather a lonely and bookish one'. She graduated from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1932 and in 1934 she earned a Master of Arts in Greek Classics. Her sf career began with 'Rocket to Limbo' for Fantastic Adventures in November 1946 and by 1950 she had published about 30 more stories. From the outset of her career, St. Clair was aware of her unusual role as a woman writing in a male-dominated field. An article she wrote for Writer's Digest in 1947, about selling stories to the science fiction market, begins: 'Why is science fiction fun to write? At first blush, it doesn't seem attractive, particularly for a woman.' A lifelong supporter of the American Friends Service Committee, she spent her final years at Friends House in Santa Rosa, California. She died in 1995.

Michael Scott Rohan

Michael Scott Rohan (1951 - 2018) Michael Scott Rohan was born in Edinburgh, in 1951, of a French father and Scottish mother, and was educated at the Edinburgh Academy and St.Edmund Hall, Oxford. He is the author of twelve fantasy and science-fiction novels, including the award-winning Winter of the World trilogy, and co-author of two more, as well as short stories and several non-fiction books. His books have appeared throughout Europe, the USA and the rest of the world, and have been republished as eBooks by SF Gateway. Besides writing novels he has been a Times columnist, edited reference books, and reviews and writes about classical music for all the major British music magazines, currently BBC Music Magazine and Opera. He enjoys singing, arguing, beer, Oriental food, travelling, playing with longbows and computers, and hobbies including archaeology and palaeontology. After 2000, diagnosed with incurable illness, he abandoned fiction writing. However, he has managed to continue travelling, throughout Scandinavia, North and South America, and both Antarctica and the Arctic, and he is finishing another fantasy novel. He passed away in 2018.

Murray Constantine

Murray Constantine (1896-1963)Murray Constantine was a pseudonym for the feminist SF writer Katharine Burdekin. Born Katharine Cade, she was the younger sister of Rowena Cade who created the Minack Theatre in Cornwall. In addition to her Utopian and Dystopian fiction, she wrote several children's books, including The Children's Country under the pen name Kay Burdekin. Her best-known work remains Swastika Night, written as Murray Constantine - a pseudonym that was not confirmed until two decades after her death.