Related to: 'A Crowd Is Not Company'

Phoenix

The Big Show

Pierre Clostermann

Robert Kee

Robert Kee was born in 1919, has an Oxford degree and has been writing ever since he left the RAF, in which he was a bomber pilot, in 1946. He has worked for Picture Post, the Observer, and the Sunday Times, and has been a literary editor of the Spectator. He has taken part in current affairs programmes and documentaries for the BBC and ITV. Most recently he has written on Britain during the Second World War, 1939: The World We Left Behind and 1945: The World We Fought For; and Trial and Error about the Guildford Pub bombings.

An Interview

Catrin Collier

Catrin Collier discusses how she gained inspiration from her mother's shocking real-life Nazi experiences for her novel ONE LAST SUMMER.

W&N

Wings on My Sleeve

Eric Brown
Kate Mosse

Tour de France; A Short Story

Click below to read Kate Mosse's short story on the Tour de France.

W&N

The Spanish Armada

Robert Hutchinson
Gollancz

The Adjacent

Christopher Priest
Coming November 2013

Read an Extract from Michael Connelly's THE GODS OF GUILT

Read an early extract from THE GODS OF GUILT by Michael Connelly, coming November 2013 by clicking the READ button below.

W&N

I Am Malala

Malala Yousafzai, Christina Lamb
W&N

Reach for the Sky

Paul Brickhill
Orion

Ghost Flight

Bear Grylls
Orion

Black Sabbath

Mick Wall

The final word on the only name synonymous with heavy metal - Black Sabbath.Way back in the mists of time, in the days when rock giants walked the earth, the name Ozzy Osbourne was synonymous with subversive and dark. Back then, Ozzy was the singer in Black Sabbath, and they meant business. In an era when it seemed possible to measure a band's musical prowess by how 'heavy' they were, they didn't come any weightier than Black Sabbath. There were, it's probably fair to say, none-more-black.A four-piece formed from the ashes of two locally well-known groups called The Rare Breed (Ozzy and bassist Geezer Butler) and Mythology (guitarist Tony Iommi and drummer Bill Ward), all four founding members of the original Black Sabbath grew up within half-a-mile of each other, in the same narrow, grey streets of Aston, a tiny Birmingham suburb then struggling to come to terms with the mess Hitler's bombs had made of it. Though they all shared a deep love of music - The Beatles for Ozzy, the Mothers of Invention for Geezer, the Shadows and Chet Atkins for Iommi, and Gene Kruppa for Ward - they all saw the opportunity to form a successful group, Ozzy would tell me, 'as the quickest way out of the slums.'This biography tells the story of how they made that dream come true - and how it then turned into a nightmare for all of them. How at the height of their fame, Sabbath discovered they had been so badly ripped off by their managers they did not even own their own songs. How they looked for salvation from Don Arden - an even more notorious gangster figure, who resurrected their career but still left them indebted to him, financially and personally. And how it finally came to a head when in 1979 they sacked Ozzy: 'For being too out of control - even for us,' as Bill Ward put it.Of course the story does not end there. The next 15 years would see a war break out between the two camps: the post-Ozzy Sabbath and Ozzy himself, whose solo career overshadowed Sabbath to the point where, when he offered them the chance to reform around him again, it was entirely on his terms. Or rather, that of his wife and manager - and, to add a further bitter twist to the tale for Sabbath, daughter of Don Arden - Sharon Osbourne.

HIGH-CONCEPT NOVELS ACQUIRED

Bear Grylls Thrillers to be Published by Orion

Orion has signed international adventurer Bear Grylls to write a series of action-adventure thrillers, featuring Dan Ranger, ex-SAS, ecologist and adventurer extraordinaire. The first book Ghost Flight, will be published in May 2015.

W&N

Valkyrie

Philipp von Boeselager
W&N

Men Of Air

Kevin Wilson

The story of the everyday heroism of British bomber crews in 1944 - the turning point year in Bomber Command's war against Germany.There were many ways for a combat crew to die during Bomber Command's war of 1944. Over German territory, bursts of heavy flak could tear the wings from their planes in a split second. Flaming bullets from German fighter planes could explode their fuel tanks, cut their oxygen supplies, destroy their engines. In the spring of that year, thousands of young men were shot, blown up, or thrown from their planes five miles above the earth; and even those who returned faced the subtler dangers of ice and fog as they tried to land their battered aircraft back home.The winter of 1944 was the most dangerous time to be a combat airman in RAF Bomber Command. The chances of surviving a tour were as low as one in five, and morale had finally hit rock bottom. In this comprehensive history of the air war that year, Kevin Wilson describes the most dangerous period of the Battle of Berlin, and the unparalleled losses over Magdeburg, Leipzig and Nuremberg. He tells how ordinary men coped with constant pressure of flying, the loss of their colleagues, and the threat of death or capture. And, by telling the story of the famous events of this period - the Great Escape, D-Day, the defeat of the V1 menace - he shows how, through sheer grit and determination, the 'Men of Air' finally turned the tide against the Germans.

The Murder Room

So What Happens to Me?

James Hadley Chase
Orion

A Thousand Suns

Alex Scarrow
W&N

Backroom Boys

Edward Smithies

Nostalgic and moving stories from the RAF staff who kept Britain's aircraft flying and fighting during the Second World War.When we remember the Second World War in the air, we think of fighter pilots and bomber crews. But what was it like for the men and women working as ground crew and in the aircraft factories who also played a crucial role in defeating Hitler? What was it like making history? What sense did these individuals have of what they were doing, either at the time or later? Did they feel they were caught up in the tide of great events? Or were they simply doing their demanding and often dangerous duty?

W&N

Dare To Be Free

W.B. 'Sandy' Thomas

When the Germans invaded Crete in 1941, Sandy Thomas was shipped to the Greek mainland as one of their prisoners. Despite being severely wounded in the leg he attempted several escapes, including being carried out of his POW camp in a coffin. He finally succeeded in a spectacular escape, and made his way across Greece to Mount Athos, a rocky peninsula populated solely by monks. Here he evaded capture for over a year, before finally stealing a boat and navigating his way through winter seas to freedom in Turkey. This, his story, is one of the great escape narratives of the Second World War.

W&N

War In A Stringbag

Charles Lamb