Related to: '617'

Adrian Goldsworthy

Adrian Goldsworthy has a doctorate from Oxford University. His first book, THE ROMAN ARMY AT WAR was recognised by John Keegan as an exceptionally impressive work, original in treatment and impressive in style. He has gone on to write several other books, including THE FALL OF THE WEST, CAESAR, IN THE NAME OF ROME, CANNAE and ROMAN WARFARE, which have sold more than a quarter of a million copies and been translated into more than a dozen languages. A full-time author, he regularly contributes to TV documentaries on Roman themes.Visit www.adriangoldsworthy.com for more information.

Anne de Courcy

Anne de Courcy is a well-known writer and journalist. In the 1970s she was Woman's Editor on the London Evening News and in the 1980s she was a regular feature-writer for the Evening Standard. She is also a former feature writer and reviewer for the Daily Mail. Her recent books include THE VICEROY'S DAUGHTERS and DEBS AT WAR.Go to www.annedecourcy.com for more information.

Anthony Head

Anthony Head came to widespread notice when he featured as librarian Rupert Giles in six seasons of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, but had first appeared in the public eye in the original London cast of Time Rice's musical Chess back in 1979 - and as Matthew in the Gold Blend television ads. Now famous as the Prime Minister in Little Britain, his UK television career ranges from The Mallens via Jonathan Creek and Silent Witness to Dr Who, and films include work with Woody Allen and Tim Burton. He features in many audiobooks, including the BBC 'Paul Temple' and 'Dr Who' series.

Antonia Fraser

Antonia Fraser is the author of many widely acclaimed historical works, including the biographies MARY, QUEEN OF SCOTS (a 40th anniversary edition was published in May 2009), CROMWELL: OUR CHIEF OF MEN, KING CHARLES II and THE GUNPOWDER PLOT (CWA Non-Fiction Gold Dagger; St Louis Literary Award). She has written five highly praised books which focus on women in history, THE WEAKER VESSEL: WOMEN'S LOT IN SEVENTEENTH CENTURY ENGLAND (Wolfson Award for History, 1984), THE WARRIOR QUEENS: BOADICEA'S CHARIOT, THE SIX WIVES OF HENRY VIII, MARIE ANTOINETTE: THE JOURNEY (Franco-British Literary Prize 2001), which was made into a film by Sofia Coppola in 2006 and most recently LOVE AND LOUIS XIV: THE WOMEN IN THE LIFE OF THE SUN KING. She was awarded the Norton Medlicott Medal by the Historical Association in 2000. Antonia Fraser was made DBE in 2011 for her services to literature. Her most recent book is MUST YOU GO?, celebrating her life with Harold Pinter, who died on Christmas Eve 2008. She lives in London.Visit Antonia Fraser's website at www.antoniafraser.com

Antony Beevor

Antony Beevor served as a regular officer in the 11th Hussars in Germany. He is the author of Crete - The Battle and the Resistance, which won a Runciman Prize, Paris After the Liberation, 1944-1949 (written with his wife Artemis Cooper), Stalingrad, which won the Samuel Johnson Prize, the Wolfson Prize for History and the Hawthornden Prize for Literature, Berlin - The Downfall, which received the first Longman-History Today Trustees' Award, and The Mystery of Olga Chekhova. Stalingrad and Berlin have been translated into twenty-five languages and sold more than two and a quarter million copies between them. His latest work, A Writer at War - Vasily Grossman with the Red Army 1941-1945, is an edition, with his Russian researcher, Dr Luba Vinogradova, of Grossman's wartime notebooks. A fellow of the Royal Society of Literature and Chevalier de l'Ordre des Arts et Lettres in France, Antony Beevor has also been the chairman of the Society of Authors and is a visiting professor at the School of History, Classics and Archaeology at Birkbeck College, University of London. He lives in London and Kent and has a daughter and a son.Go to www.antonybeevor.com for more information. Antony Beevor is on Twitter at https://twitter.com/antonybeevor, and on Facebook at www.facebook.com/pages/Antony-Beevor

Ben Macintyre

Ben Macintyre is a columnist and Associate Editor on THE TIMES. He has worked as the newspaper's correspondent in New York, Paris and Washington. He now lives in London with his wife and three children.

Charles Spencer

Charles Spencer was educated at Eton College and obtained his degree in Modern History at Magdalen College, Oxford. Since he was a boy the Battle of Blenheim has fascinated him - it was even his History O level special project - partly because of the Spencer-Churchill direct link to the engagement's prime victor, John, Duke of Marlborough. While in the middle of a seven year stint as a correspondent for NBC News in the United States, Charles Spencer inherited the ancestral home of Althorp, Northampton, which he has since restored and refurbished. He lives at Althorp and in West London with his wife, four children from his first marriage, and two stepsons. He achieved worldwide attention after speaking passionately at the funeral of his sister Diana, Princess of Wales, in 1997. His previous works are 'Althorp: the Story of an English House' (1998) and 'The Spencer Family' (1999).

Christopher Duffy

After obtaining his doctorate at Oxford, Christopher Duffy divided his time between researching history and teaching officer cadets and student officers at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst and the Army Staff College. From 1996 to 2001 he was Research Professor in the History of War at De Montfort University, and he now devotes himself entirely to voluntary work and writing. He is the author of some twenty books, including The Army of Frederick the Great and The '45. Fluent in six languages, he is an acknowledged expert on the Austrian and German armies from the eighteenth century to 1945, and his work on European military history of the eighteenth century has won him international renown.

Christopher Meyer

Christopher Meyer served as Ambassador to the United Kingdom to the United States from 1997 until 2003. He was a vital link in the important relationship between America and Britain, one of the closest periods since the Second World War. He had previously been British Ambassador to Germany and chief spokesman and press secretary for former Prime Minister John Major, and for Geoffrey Howe when he was Foreign Secretary. In 2003 Meyer was appointed Chairman of the Press Complaints Commission, a position he held until April 2009. He was knighted in 2001.

David Blakeley

Captain David Blakeley was second in command of the elite Pathfinder Platoon and fought in the Iraq war in 2003 and in Afghanistan after 9/11. Before that, with 1 PARA he saw action in Kosovo, Sierra Leone and Northern Ireland and was, at one point, the youngest Captain in the British Army. After being seriously injured in Iraq he fought his way back to physical fitness and went on to undertake SAS selection. He now works as a military consultant to TV and film production companies. Pathfinder is his first book. He lives in London.Visit David Blakeley's website at http://www.davidblakeley.co.uk and follow him on Twitter https://twitter.com/daveblakeley.

Douglas Hurd

Douglas Hurd is a politician, biographer and novelist who served in the governments of Margaret Thatcher and John Major, as Minister for Europe (1979-83), Secretary of State for Northern Ireland (1984-85), Home Secretary (1985-89) and Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs (1989-95). His previous books include his MEMOIRS, ROBERT PEEL: A BIOGRAPHY and, with Edward Young, CHOOSE YOUR WEAPONS: THE BRITISH FOREIGN SECRETARY - 200 YEARS OF ARGUMENT, SUCCESS AND FAILURE.

Gavin Mortimer

Gavin Mortimer was born in London 34 years ago. As a freelance journalist he has contributed articles to a diverse range of magazines and newspapers, including the Observer, the Guardian, History Monthly and Esquire. The Longest Night is his fourth book and the second to be published by Weidenfeld & Nicolson. The first, Stirling's Men: the Inside History of the SAS in World War II, was published in 2004 and is now available in paperback.

Hugh Sebag-Montefiore

Barrister and journalist (currently attached to the Mail on Sunday). His family owned Bletchley Park - here the Enigma code was broken - until they sold it to the British government in 1937.

John Lewis-Stempel

John Lewis-Stempel is the author of numerous anthologies and books on military history. He lives on a farm in Herefordshire with his wife and two children.Join John Lewis-Stempel on Facebook www.facebook.com/pages/John-Lewis-Stempel and follow him on Twitterhttps://twitter.com/JLewisStempel.

Leonie Frieda

Swedish by birth, but educated in Britain, Leonie Frieda speaks five languages and is a member of the Institute of Linguists. Her long interest in Catherine de Medici resulted in a biography that was a bestseller on both sides of the Atlantic and was translated into six languages. She is now working on a composite biography of six renaissance women. She lives in London with her daughter Elisabeth and son Jake.http://www.leoniefrieda.com/

Mark Seal

Mark Seal has been a journalist for 34 years. Currently a contributing editor at VANITY FAIR, he has written for a long list of major magazines and served as a collaborator on almost 20 non fiction books. He lives in Aspen, Colorado.

Nigel Steel

Nigel Steel is head of the Imperial War Museum's Research and Information Department. He and Peter Hart have collaborated on several titles, including works on Gallipoli, Passchendaele and the First World War in the air.

Peter Hart

Peter Hart was born in 1955. He went to Liverpool University before joining the Sound Archive at the Imperial War Museum in 1981. He is now Oral Historian at the Archive. He is the author of several highly acclaimed works on the First World War.

Philip Eade

Philip Eade was born in Shropshire and read History at Bristol University. He was briefly a criminal barrister and later worked as a writer and editor on the obituaries desk of the Daily Telegraph. He lives in London and the Welsh marches.

Ramita Navai

Ramita Navai was born in Iran and grew up in London, but returned to live in Tehran in 2003. She spent three years as the Tehran correspondent for The Times, covering everything from the Bam earthquake to the escalating nuclear crisis. Since leaving Iran, she has worked as a reporter for Channel 4's primetime and award-winning foreign affairs series, Unreported World, and so far has made nineteen documentaries for the series. Ramita has also worked extensively as a journalist for the United Nations, covering crises in Iran, Pakistan and Iraq and has also written for many publications including the Sunday Times, Irish Times, Independent, Guardian and Marie-Claire and has recently started to blog about her work for the Huffington Post.Follow Ramita Navai on Twitter https://twitter.com/ramitanavai