Related to: 'Empire of Silence'

Jacqueline Carey

Jacqueline Carey is the bestselling and award-winning author of the critically acclaimed Kushiel's Legacy series of historical fantasy novels and The Sundering epic fantasy duology. Her desire to write professionally emerged as a driving passion whilst she was living in London and working in a bookshop. She lives in West Michigan, and you can learn more by visiting her website: www.jacquelinecarey.com

Jane Whittington Griffin

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Joanna Russ

Joanna Russ was born in New York City and is regarded as one of the leading feminist science fiction writers. She died in 2011.

John Gribbin

John Gribbin is a British science writer, astrophysicist and visiting fellow in astronomy at the University of Sussex, where he graduated with a BA in physics in 1966 and did his master of science (MSc) in 1967. He earned his PhD in astrophysics from the University of Cambridge in 1971. Author of the well-known IN SEARCH OF SCHRODINGER'S CAT, Gribbin's work as a scientist is often reflected in his writing which covers a wide range of topics, such as quantum physics, human evolution, the origins of the universe, climate change and global warming.

John Wyndham

John Wyndham (1903-69) John Wyndham Parkes Lucas Beynon Harris was the son of a barrister, who started writing short stories in 1925. During the war he was in the civil service and then the army. In 1946 he went back to writing stories for publication in the USA and decided to try a modified form of science fiction, which he called 'logical fantasy'. As John Wyndham, he is best-known as the author of The Day of the Triffids, but he wrote many other successful novels including The Kraken Wakes, The Chrysalids and The Midwich Cuckoos (filmed as Village of the Damned).

K. W. Jeter

K. W. Jeter is an award-winning novelist who received superb reviews for their Blade Runner sequel novels.

Karen Anderson

Karen Kruse Anderson was the widow and sometime co-author of Poul Anderson, and mother-in-law of writer Greg Bear. She wrote the first published science fiction haiku (or scifaiku), "Six Haiku" in The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, in July 1962, and is one of the founders of the Society for Creative Anachronism. She was invested as a member of the Baker Street Irregulars, and was active both in Sherlockian groups and in the Los Angeles Science-Fantasy Society. She died in 2018, aged 85.

Karen Haber

Karen Haber (1955 - )Karen Haber, working name of Karen Lee Haber Silverberg, is both a science fiction and non-fiction author and editor, as well as being an art critic and historian. Beginning her career as a genre writer with "Madre de Dios", published in The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction in 1988, she became more popular with her Fire in Winter sequence. Subsequently, Haber's work has appeared in magazines such as Asimov's Science Fiction and many anthologies. In total she has authored nine books including Star Trek Voyager: Bless the Beasts, and is co-author of Science of the X-Men. Her non-fiction essay Meditations on Middle Earth was nominated for the 2001 Hugo award. She has been married to fellow SF author Robert Silverberg since 1987.

Kristen Ciccarelli

Kristen Ciccarelli (@SheLuresDragons) hails from Ontario's Niagara Peninsula where she grew up on her grandfather's grape farm. She's made her living as a baker, a bookseller, and a potter, but now writes YA fantasy books about bloodthirsty dragons, girls wielding really cool weapons, and the transformative power of stories.You can learn more at www.kristenciccarelli.com

Kristin Cashore

Kristin Cashore is an award-winning author in the fantasy and YA genre. She has an M.A. in children's literature and has lived in Pennsylvania, Florida, Sydney, Cambridge, Austin, Italy and even London before settling, for the moment, in Boston.

Larry Dixon

Larry Dixon is both a fantasy artist and author who studied at The North Carolina School of the Arts and The Savannah College of Art & Design. He married Mercedes Lackey, with whom he collaborated on a number of novels, in 1992. They live in Tulsa, Oklahoma, and run a sanctuary for birds of prey and an aviary for exotic birds.

Lawrence Watt-Evans

Lawrence Watt-Evans (1954- )Lawrence Watt-Evans is the working name of American science fiction and fantasy writer Lawrence Watt Evans. He was born in Arlington, Massachusetts, as the fourth of six children and studied at Bedford High School and Princeton University, although he left the latter without a degree. Watt-Evans began publishing sf in 1975 with "Paranoid Fantasy #1" for American Athiest. He has constructed several scripts for Marvel Comics and has been moderately prolific as a short story writer, with "Why I Left Harry's All-Night Hamburgers" (Asimov's, July 1987) won a 1988 Hugo.

Libby Page

Libby Page wrote The Lido while working in marketing and moonlighting as a writer. The Lido has sold in over twenty territories around the world and film rights have been sold to Catalyst Global Media. After writing, Libby's second passion is outdoor swimming. Libby lives in London where she enjoys finding new swimming spots and pockets of community within the city. Follow Libby on twitter @libbypagewrites

Lynsay Sands

Lynsay Sands was born in Canada and is an award-winning author of more than 30 books, which have made the Barnes & Noble and NEW YORK TIMES bestseller lists. She is best known for her Argeneau series, about a modern-day family of vampires. Please visit her on the web at www.lynsaysands.net.

M.J. Engh

M.J. Engh is the author of the science fiction classic Arslan. She lives in Washington, USA.

Marcus Chown

Marcus Chown (1959 - )Marcus Chown graduated from the University of London in 1980 with a first class degree in physics. He also earned a Master of Science in astrophysics from the California Institute of Technology. Currently the cosmology consultant for New Scientist magazine, Chown has co-authored two hard SF novels with John Gribbin: Double Planet and its remote sequel Reunion.

Margaret St Clair

Margaret St Clair (1911-1995)Margaret St Clair was an American science fiction writer who wrote mostly under her own name, but published a number of titles under the pseudonyms Idris Seabright and Wilton Hazzard. Born in Hutchinson, Kansas, St Clair had no siblings and recalled her childhood as 'rather a lonely and bookish one'. She graduated from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1932 and in 1934 she earned a Master of Arts in Greek Classics. Her sf career began with 'Rocket to Limbo' for Fantastic Adventures in November 1946 and by 1950 she had published about 30 more stories. From the outset of her career, St. Clair was aware of her unusual role as a woman writing in a male-dominated field. An article she wrote for Writer's Digest in 1947, about selling stories to the science fiction market, begins: 'Why is science fiction fun to write? At first blush, it doesn't seem attractive, particularly for a woman.' A lifelong supporter of the American Friends Service Committee, she spent her final years at Friends House in Santa Rosa, California. She died in 1995.

Maureen F. McHugh

Maureen F. McHugh was born in Loveland, Ohio, and educated at Ohio University and New York University. She taught in Chinafor a year, and her experiences there and in New York formed the basis of her first novel, China Mountain Zhang. She has lived in New York City, Shijiazhuang, China, and Austin, Texas. She currently resides in Los Angeles, California.

Mercedes Lackey

Mercedes Lackey (1950-)Mercedes entered this world on June 24, 1950, in Chicago, had a normal childhood and graduated from Purdue University in 1972. During the late 70's she worked as an artist's model and then went into the computer programming field, ending up with American Airlines in Tulsa, Oklahoma. In addition to her fantasy writing, she has written lyrics for and recorded nearly fifty songs for Firebird Arts & Music, a small recording company specializing in science fiction folk music.

Murray Constantine

Murray Constantine (1896-1963)Murray Constantine was a pseudonym for the feminist SF writer Katharine Burdekin. Born Katharine Cade, she was the younger sister of Rowena Cade who created the Minack Theatre in Cornwall. In addition to her Utopian and Dystopian fiction, she wrote several children's books, including The Children's Country under the pen name Kay Burdekin. Her best-known work remains Swastika Night, written as Murray Constantine - a pseudonym that was not confirmed until two decades after her death.