Related to: 'Clash of Empires'

A K Benedict

A K Benedict read English at Cambridge and studied creative writing at Sussex. She composed film and television soundtracks, as well as performing as a musician before becoming a full-time writer in 2012. She now writes novels, drama, poetry and short stories, and lives in St Leonards-on-Sea with her dog, Dame Margaret Rutherford. Find out more at or follow her on Twitter @ak_benedict

Alex Butterworth

Alex Butterworth is a writer and dramatist, with work spanning books, theatre, film and television.

Alistair Beaton

Alistair Beaton is one of the country's leading satirical writers, and makes frequent appearances on Radio 4. His hit comedy Feelgood won the Evening Standard Award in 2001

Anna Freeman

Anna Freeman is a lecturer in Creative Writing at Bath Spa University as well as a multiple slam-winning performance poet who has appeared at festivals across Britain including Latitude and Glastonbury. She lives in Bristol. Her first novel, The Fair Fight, was shortlisted for the Authors' Club Best First Novel award.

Anna Kendall

Anna Kendall is the YA pseudonym of SF author Nancy Kress, who has won multiple awards for her novels, novellas and short stories. She lives in Seattle.

Barry Strauss

Barry Strauss read History at Cornell and gained a PhD at Yale in 1979. He is now Professor of History and Classics at Cornell University. The author of nine books, he has appeared in many TV documentaries, and has contributed op-ed pieces to the WASHINGTON POST and LOS ANGELES TIMES.

Ben Kane

Ben Kane is one of the most hard-working and successful historical writers in the industry. His third book, The Road to Rome, was a Sunday Times number four bestseller, and every title since has been a top ten bestseller. Born in Kenya, Kane moved to Ireland at the age of seven. After qualifying as a veterinarian, he worked in small animal practice and during the terrible Foot and Mouth Disease outbreak in 2001. Despite his veterinary career, he retained a deep love of history; this led him to begin writing. His first novel, The Forgotten Legion, was published in 2008; since then he has written four series of Roman novels. Kane has walked more than 500 miles in full Roman military gear, including the length of Hadrian's Wall and a long march to Rome. He has also cycled 1500 miles from Spain to Italy via the Alps, à la Hannibal. During these three epic events, he has raised almost £65,000 for charity. He is active on social media and averages more than fifty events per year. Kane lives in Somerset with his wife and two children.

C. Robert Cargill

Cargill wrote for Ain't it Cool News for nearly 10 years under the pseudonym Massawyrm, as well as serving as a staff writer for and He appears as the animated character Carlyle on, where he also hosts a featured podcast. His first screenplay, the critically acclaimed SINISTER, was co-written and directed by Scott Derrickson and starred Ethan Hawke. He recently co-wrote the screenplay for Marvel's DOCTOR STRANGE.

Catherine Lim

Catherine Lim grew up in Malaysia but lives and works in Singapore where she lectured in Applied Linguistics before turning to writing full time. She has published seven collections of short stories (two of which have been used as GCSE texts by Cambridge University), three novels, a book of poems and hundreds of articles.

Christian Cameron

Christian Cameron is a writer and military historian. He participates in re-enacting and experimental archaeology, teaches armoured fighting and historical swordsmanship, and takes his vacations with his family visiting battlefields, castles and cathedrals. He lives in Toronto and is busy writing his next novel.

Domenic Stansberry

Domenic Stansberry is the Edgar Award-winning author of ten novels and a collection of stories. His North Beach Mystery series has won wide praise for its portrayal of the ethnic and political subcultures of San Francisco. Books from that series include The Ancient Rain named one of the best crime novels of the last decade by Booklist. An earlier novel, The Confession, received the Edgar Allan Poe Award for its controversial portrait of a Marin County psychologist accused of murdering his mistress. The White Devil was the winner of the 2016 Hammett Prize for best crime fiction. Stansberry grew up in the San Francisco area and currently lives with his wife, the poet Gillian Conoley, and their daughter Gillis in a small town north of that city.

Fiona Ford

Fiona Ford was born in Cornwall and grew up in Bath. As well as having a thirst for books Fiona had a huge interest in history and adored listening to her grandfather talk about his time in the navy during World War Two. Together they spent many a happy afternoon poring over the large collection of photos he had taken travelling the globe, somehow managing to perfectly capture life during wartime. Although Fiona went on to develop a successful career as a journalist, she never forgot her passion for the past. Now, Fiona has combined her love of writing with her love of days gone by in The Spark Girl, the first in a series of wartime sagas.Find out more about Fiona by following her on twitter @fionajourno, or visiting her website

Francesca Jakobi

Francesca studied psychology at the University of Sussex, followed by a stint teaching English in Turkey and the Czech Republic. On returning to her native London she got a job as a reporter on a local paper and has worked in journalism ever since. She's currently a layout editor at the Financial Times. Bitter is her first novel.

Godfrey Blunden

Godfrey Blunden (1906-1996) was an Australian journalist and author. He authored several novels, including A Room on the Route and The Time of the Assassins. His novel Charco Harbour is a modernist historical fiction on Captain James Cook and his journey along the Australian coast in 1768. He died in Paris in 1996.

Jean Fullerton

Jean Fullerton is the author of seven historical novels. She is a qualified District and Queen's nurse who has spent most of her working life in the East End of London, first as a Sister in charge of a team, and then as a District Nurse tutor. She is also a qualified teacher and spent twelve years lecturing on community nursing studies at a London university. She now writes full-time. Find out more at

Julia Gregson

Julia Gregson's novel East of the Sun was chosen for the Richard and Judy TV Book Club and became a Sunday Times bestseller in the UK. Previously a journalist for the Sydney Morning Herald, The Times, Good Housekeeping, and Rolling Stone in the USA, Julia is married and lives in Monmouth. To find out more about Julia and her books, visit her website or follow her on Twitter at @juliagregson

Julian Fellowes

Julian Fellowes, actor, writer, director, producer, was educated at Ampleforth, Magdalene College, Cambridge and Webber Douglas Academy of Dramatic Art. He trained in repertory theatre at Northampton and Harrogate. As creator, sole writer and executive producer of the hit television series Downton Abbey, Fellowes has won three Emmy awards and a Golden Globe. Fellowes received the Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay for Gosford Park (2002). His work was also honoured by the Writer's Guild of America, the New York Film Critics' Circle and the National Society of Film Critics for Best Screenplay. Other writing credits for film include Piccadilly Jim (2004), Vanity Fair (2004), Young Victoria (2009), The Tourist (2010), Romeo & Juliet (2013), and the three-part drama Doctor Thorne for ITV. Fellowes also wrote and directed the award-winning films Separate Lies and From Time to Time. Fellowes wrote the books for the Tony-nominated stage production of Mary Poppins and for School of Rock: The Musical which opened on Broadway in December 2015, and was written and produced by Andrew Lloyd Webber.Fellowes has authored two novels: the international bestsellers Snobs (2005) and Past Imperfect (2008).Julian Fellowes became a life peer in 2011. He lives in Dorset and London with his wife, Emma.

Katharine McMahon

Katharine McMahon studied English and Drama at Bristol University, has taught and trained extensively both in creative writing and within the criminal justice system, has served on The Sentencing Council and The Judicial Appointments Commission and currently works for the Royal Literary Fund developing projects that help writers use their unique skills in the community. She is the author of ten novels, including The Alchemist's Daughter and The Crimson Rooms, that focus on astonishing women and their ability to find a voice and make a mark, even at times and in societies when they are risking everything. The Rose of Sebastopol was a Richard & Judy pick and a Sunday Times

Kevin Ivison

Captain Kevin Ivison, GM, was commissioned into the army in 2000, and served in Afghanistan, Bosnia, Kosovo, Northern Ireland and Iraq, where his work as a bomb disposal expert won him the George Medal. Since leaving the army in April 2009 he has worked for the Ministry of Defence.

Lawrence Watt-Evans

Lawrence Watt-Evans (1954- )Lawrence Watt-Evans is the working name of American science fiction and fantasy writer Lawrence Watt Evans. He was born in Arlington, Massachusetts, as the fourth of six children and studied at Bedford High School and Princeton University, although he left the latter without a degree. Watt-Evans began publishing sf in 1975 with "Paranoid Fantasy #1" for American Athiest. He has constructed several scripts for Marvel Comics and has been moderately prolific as a short story writer, with "Why I Left Harry's All-Night Hamburgers" (Asimov's, July 1987) won a 1988 Hugo.