Related to: 'The Watcher of Dead Time'

Gollancz

The Cathedral of Known Things

Edward Cox
Authors:
Edward Cox
Gollancz

The Relic Guild

Edward Cox
Authors:
Edward Cox

Magic caused the war. Magic is forbidden. Magic will save us.It was said the Labyrinth had once been the great meeting place, a sprawling city at the heart of an endless maze where a million humans hosted the Houses of the Aelfir. The Aelfir who had brought trade and riches, and a future full of promise. But when the Thaumaturgists, overlords of human and Aelfir alike, went to war, everything was ruined and the Labyrinth became an abandoned forbidden zone, where humans were trapped behind boundary walls 100 feet high.Now the Aelfir are a distant memory and the Thaumaturgists have faded into myth. Young Clara struggles to survive in a dangerous and dysfunctional city, where eyes are keen, nights are long, and the use of magic is punishable by death. She hides in the shadows, fearful that someone will discover she is touched by magic. She knows her days are numbered. But when a strange man named Fabian Moor returns to the Labyrinth, Clara learns that magic serves a higher purpose and that some myths are much more deadly in the flesh.The only people Clara can trust are the Relic Guild, a secret band of magickers sworn to protect the Labyrinth. But the Relic Guild are now too few. To truly defeat their old nemesis Moor, mightier help will be required. To save the Labyrinth - and the lives of one million humans - Clara and the Relic Guild must find a way to contact the worlds beyond their walls.

Algis Budrys

Algis Budrys (1931-2008) Born in East Prussia in 1931, Budrys and his family were sent to the United States when he was just five. After studying at the University of Miami and Columbia University, Budrys turned his hand to both writing and publishing science fiction. Over the years he worked as an editor, manager and reviewer for various publishing houses, while maintaining an impressive output of fiction and editing his own magazine, Tomorrow Speculative Fiction. He was shortlisted for numerous awards, including the Hugo and the Nebula, for his fiction and critical non-fiction. He died in 2008.

Christopher Priest

Christopher Priest's novels have built him an inimitable dual reputation as a contemporary literary novelist and a leading figure in modern SF and fantasy. His novel THE PRESTIGE is unique in winning both a major literary prize (THE JAMES TAIT BLACK AWARD and a major genre prize THE WORLD FANTASY AWARD); THE SEPARATION won both the ARTHUR C. CLARKE and the BRITISH SCIENCE FICTION AWARDS. THE ISLANDERS won both the BSFA and John W. Campbell awards. He was selected for the original BEST OF YOUNG BRITISH NOVELISTS in 1983.

Dan Simmons

Dan Simmons won the World Fantasy Award for his first novel, SONG OF KALI, inspired by his travels in India. In the 1990s he rewrote the SF rulebook with his Hyperion Cantos quartet. He has also written thrillers. Alongside his writing he maintains a career as a college lecturer in English Literature in the USA.

Daniel Keyes

Daniel Keyes (1927-2014)Born in Brooklyn in 1927, Daniel Keyes worked as a merchant seaman, editor and university lecturer. He published four other novels, but Flowers for Algernon, originally a short story, for which he won the Hugo Award, later expanded into the Nebula Award-winning novel and adapted as an Oscar-winning film (Charly, 1968) remains his best-known work. Daniel Keyes had a masters degree in English and American literature and was a Professor of English and Creative writing. He died in 2014.

David Langford

David Langford is a writer, critic and SF fan who has won innumerable Hugo Awards for his fan writing and for his news magazine ANSIBLE, a legend in SF and fantasy circles. He has been involved with Terry Pratchett's Discworld since the very beginning, and has compiled two Discworld quizbooks, THE UNSEEN UNIVERSITY CHALLENGE and THE WYRDEST LINK.

David Lindsay

David Lindsay (1878-1945) David Lindsay was born in London into a middle class family. Although he won a scholarship to university, he was forced by penury to go into business and he became an insurance clerk at Lloyd's of London. He was very successful but, after serving in the First World War, at the age of forty he moved to Cornwall with his new, young wife to become a full-time writer. He published A Voyage to Arcturus in 1920 but it was not a success, selling fewer than six hundred copies, and thereafter his life was a constant struggle for recognition.

Frank Herbert

Frank Herbert (1920-86) was born in Tacoma, Washington and worked as a reporter and later editor of a number of West Coast newspapers before becoming a full-time writer. His first SF story was published in 1952 but he achieved fame more than ten years later with the publication in Analog of 'Dune World' and 'The Prophet of Dune' that were amalgamated in the novel Dune in 1965.

Fritz Leiber

Fritz Leiber is considered one of science fiction's legends. Author of a prodigious number of stories and novels, many of which were made into films, he is best known as creator of the classic Lankhmar fantasy series. Fritz Leiber has won awards too numerous to count including the coveted Hugo and Nebula, and was honored as a lifetime Grand Master by the Science Fiction Writers of America. He died in 1992.

H.G. Wells

H.G. Wells was born in Bromley, Kent in 1866. After working as a draper's apprentice and pupil-teacher, he won a scholarship to the Normal School of Science in 1884, studying under T. H. Huxley. He was awarded a first-class honours degree in biology and resumed teaching but had to retire after a kick from an ill-natured pupil afflicted his kidneys. He worked in poverty in London as a crammer while experimenting in journalism and stories. It was with THE TIME MACHINE (1895) that he had his real breakthrough.

Jack Finney

Born in 1911 the American author Jack Finney wrote numerous SF novels, thrillers and mysteries, several of which were adapted to film. He is best known as the author of The Body Snatchers, which became the hugely popular and influential film, The Invasion of the Bodysnatchers. He was awarded the World Fantasy Award for Lifetime Achievement in 1987. A long time resident of Californa he died in 1995.

Joe Haldeman

Joe Haldeman was born in Oklahoma in 1943 and studied physics and astronomy before serving as a combat engineer in Vietnam, where he was severely wounded and won a Purple Heart. The Forever War was his first SF novel and it won both the Hugo and Nebula awards, a feat which The Forever Peace repeated. He is also the author of, among others, Mindbridge, All My Sins Remembered, Worlds, Worlds Apart and Worlds Enough and Time.

John C. Gardner

John Gardner (1933-1982) John Gardner was born in Batavia, New York. His critically acclaimed books include the novels Grendel, The Sunlight Dialogues and October Light, for which he received the National Book Critics Circle Award, as well as several works of nonfiction and criticism such as On Becoming a Novelist. He was also a professor of medieval literature and a pioneering creative writing teacher whose students included Raymond Carver and Charles Johnson.

John Crowley

John Crowley was born in 1942 and has worked in documentary films and TV since 1966. The Deep, his first SF novel, was published in 1975 and was followed by Beasts, Engine Summer and Great Work of Time. In his later work, Little, Big, Aegypt and Love and Sleep, he has moved into writing fantasy to great critical acclaim.

Justin Cronin

Born and raised in New England, Justin Cronin is a multi-award-winning writer. He is Professor of English at Rice University, and lives with his family in Houston, Texas.

Karl Edward Wagner

Karl Edward Wagner (1945 - 1994)Karl Edward Wagner was born in Knoxville, Tennessee. He earned a degree in history from Kenyon College in 1967 and a degree in psychiatry from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Despite this training, Wagner disliked the medical profession and abandoned it upon establishing himself as a writer; his disillusionment with the medical profession can be seen in the stories 'The Fourth Seal' and 'Into Whose Hands'. As well as being a multi-award winning author, Wagner was a highly successful editor and publisher of horror, science fiction and heroic fantasy, creating a definitive three-volume set of Robert E. Howard's Conan the Barbarian fiction, and edited the long-running and genre-defining Year's Best Horror and Fantasy series. Wagner is perhaps best known for his creation of the long-running series of stories featuring Kane, the Mystic Swordsman. He died in 1994.

Lucius Shepard

Lucius Shepard (1947 - 2014)Lucius Shepard was born in the USA in 1947. From the mid-1960s to the early 1980s he lived in various parts of the world and travelled widely. He won the John W. Campbell Award for best new writer in 1985 and also won the World Fantasy Award twice. He died in 2014.

M. John Harrison

M. John Harrison (1945 - ) Michael John Harrison is the author of, amongst others, the Viriconium stories, The Centauri Device, Climbers, The Course of the Heart, Signs of Life, Light and Nova Swing. He has won the Boardman Tasker Award (Climbers), the James Tiptree Jr Award (Light) and the Arthur C. Clarke Award (Nova Swing). He lives in Shropshire.

Mary Gentle

Mary Gentle is one of the world's most acclaimed writers of fantasy and science fiction; ASH, the largest single fantasy work ever - longer even than THE LORD OF THE RINGS - combines the authentic details of Bernard Cornwell and the magical storytelling of Terry Goodkind; all editions were Gollancz bestsellers. Mary has a number of academic degrees, including an MA in War Studies, and has hands-on experience of sword-fighting and armour, amongst many other useful talents. She lives in Stevenage, Hertfordshire.