Related to: 'Exodus'

Gollancz

Nemesis

Alex Lamb
Authors:
Alex Lamb
Gollancz

Roboteer

Alex Lamb
Authors:
Alex Lamb
Gollancz

Glorious Angels

Justina Robson
Authors:
Justina Robson
Gollancz

Three Early Novels

Philip K. Dick
Authors:
Philip K. Dick

At the beginning of his career, Philip K. Dick, whose later work won him widespread acclaim as the world's greatest science fiction writer, wrote a number of short novels which were published as paperback originals back-to-back in dual volumes with works by writers who were then more famous. Considerably more straightforward than his later novels, these stories are nevertheless unmistakably the work of the author of DO ANDOIDS DREAM OF ELECTRIC SHEEP? and UBIK in their quirky exuberance and originality.THE MAN WHO JAPED: Following a devastating nuclear war, the Moral Reclamation government took over the world and forced its citizens to live by strictly puritanical rules - no premarital sex, drunkenness, or displaying of neon signs - all of which are reinforced through a constant barrage of messaging to the public. The chief purveyor of these messages is Alan Purcell, next in line to become head of the propaganda bureau. But there is just one problem: a statue of the government's founder has been vandalized and the head is hidden in Purcell's closet. VULCAN'S HAMMER: After the 20th century's devastating series of wars, the world's governments banded together into one globe-spanning entity, committed to peace at all costs. Ensuring that peace is the Vulcan supercomputer, responsible for all major decisions. But some people don't like being taken out of the equation. And others resent the idea that the Vulcan is taking the place of God. As the world grows ever closer to all-out war, one functionary frantically tries to prevent it. But the Vulcan computer has its own plans, plans that might not include humanity at all.DR. FUTURITY: When Dr Jim Parsons wakes up from a car accident, he finds himself in a future populated almost entirely by the young. But to keep the world run by the young, death is fetishized, and those who survive to old age are put down. In such a world, Parsons - with his innate desire to save lives - is a criminal and outcast. But for one revolutionary group, he may be just the saviour they need to heal and revive their cryogenically frozen leader. And when he and the group journey to 1500s California, what they find causes them to question what they know about history and the underpinnings of their society.

Gollancz

Elric of Melniboné and Other Stories

Michael Moorcock
Authors:
Michael Moorcock

Andrzej Sapkowski

Sapkowski was born in 1948 in Poland. He studied economy and business, but the success of his fantasy cycle about the sorcerer Geralt de Rivia turned him into a bestselling writer and he is now one of Poland's most famous and successful authors, selling more in his own country than Stephen King or Michael Crichton.

Arkady Strugatsky

Arkady Strugatsky (1925-1991) and Boris Strugatsky (1931-2012) Arkady and Boris Strugatsky began to collaborate in the early 1950s after Arkady had studied English and Japanese and worked as a technical translator and editor, and Boris was a computer mathematician at Pulkova astronomical observatory. The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction describes them as 'the best Soviet SF writers' and works such as Hard to be a God, Definitely Maybe, The Snail on the Slope and Monday Begins on Saturday are powerful and poignant novels that continue to amaze and move readers. Andrei Tarkovsky's much admired film, Stalker, was based on their most famous work, Roadside Picnic.Read more at http://sf-encyclopedia.com/entry/strugatski_arkady

Boris Strugatsky

Arkady Strugatsky (1925-1991) and Boris Strugatsky (1931-2012) Arkady and Boris Strugatsky began to collaborate in the early 1950s after Arkady had studied English and Japanese and worked as a technical translator and editor, and Boris was a computer mathematician at Pulkova astronomical observatory. The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction describes them as 'the best Soviet SF writers' and works such as Hard to be a God, Definitely Maybe, The Snail on the Slope and Monday Begins on Saturday are powerful and poignant novels that continue to amaze and move readers. Andrei Tarkovsky's much admired film, Stalker, was based on their most famous work, Roadside Picnic.

George R.R. Martin

George R.R. Martin published his first story in 1971 and quickly rose to prominence, winning four HUGO and two NEBULA Awards in quick succession before he turned his attention to fantasy with the historical horror novel FEVRE DREAM, now a Fantasy Masterwork. Since then he has won every major award in the fields of fantasy, SF and horror. His magnificent epic saga A Song of Ice and Fire is redefining epic fantasy for a new generation, and is the basis for the hit HBO series GAME OF THRONES. George R.R. Martin lives in New Mexico.Read more at http://sf-encyclopedia.com/entry/martin_george_r_r

Greg Bear

Greg Bear is one of the world's leading hard SF authors. A multiple Hugo and Nebula award winner, he sold his first short story, at the age of fifteen, to Robert Lowndes's Famous Science Fiction. His novels Blood Music and Eon are both Gollancz Masterworks. A full-time writer, he lives in Washington with his family.

Iain M. Banks

Iain Menzies Banks (1954-2013) was born in Fife, and was educated at Stirling University, where he studied English Literature, Philosophy and Psychology. Banks came to widespread and controversial public notice with the publication of his first novel, The Wasp Factory, in 1984. His first science fiction novel, Consider Phlebas, was published in 1987. He continued to write both mainstream fiction (as Iain Banks) and science fiction (as Iain M. Banks), and was acclaimed as one of the most powerful, innovative and exciting writers of his generation. He died in 2013.

Jack Vance

Jack Vance (1916-2013)John Holbrook Vance was born in 1916 and studied mining, engineering and journalism at the University of California. During the Second World War he served in the merchant navy and was torpedoed twice. He started contributing stories to the pulp magazines in the mid 1940s and published his first book, The Dying Earth, in 1950. Among his many books are The Dragon Masters, for which he won his first Hugo Award, Big Planet, The Anome, and the Lyonesse sequence. He has won the Hugo, Nebula and World Fantasy Awards, amongst others, and in 1997 was named a Grand Master by the Science Fiction Writers of America.

James Barclay

James Barclay is the author of the Chronicles of the Raven and Legends of the Raven series, which have sold hundreds of thousands of copies. The Raven saga came to a conclusion with the stunning Ravensoul. He also penned the epic fantasy duology The Ascendants of Estorea and completed an Elves trilogy: Elves: Once Walked With Gods, Elves: Rise of the Tai'Gethen and Elves: Beyond the Mists of Katura.James Barclay lives in Teddington with his wife and two children. Find out more on his website, www.jamesbarclay.com, or follow @barculator on Twitter.

Justina Robson

Justina Robson is an Arthur C. Clarke shortlisted author of ten SFF novels, including the highly regarded Quantum Gravity series, and was one of the first writers to win amazon.co.uk's Writer's Bursary in 2000. Based in Leeds, she's been shortlisted for multiple international awards and is a sought-after creative writing teacher who has taught at the Arvon Foundation. A graduate of the Clarion West workshops in Seattle (1996) she has been invited to teach there also, though she hasn't made it yet for various practical reasons. She acted as a judge for the Arthur C Clarke awards on behalf of the Science Fiction Foundation in 2006. Her most recently published novel is Glorious Angels, shortlisted for the British Science Fiction Association Best Novel 2015. You can learn more at justinarobson.co.uk or by following @JustinaRobson on Twitter.

Lynsay Sands

Lynsay Sands was born in Canada and is an award-winning author of more than 30 books, which have made the Barnes & Noble and NEW YORK TIMES bestseller lists. She is best known for her Argeneau series, about a modern-day family of vampires.

Michael Moorcock

Michael Moorcock (1939-)Michael Moorcock is one of the most important figures in British SF and Fantasy literature. The author of many literary novels and stories in practically every genre, his novels have won and been shortlisted for numerous awards including the Hugo, Nebula, World Fantasy, Whitbread and Guardian Fiction Prize. In 1999, he was given the World Fantasy Life Achievement Award; in 2001, he was inducted into the SF Hall of Fame; and in 2007, he was named a SFWA Grandmaster. Michael Moorcock is also a musician who has performed since the seventies with his own band, the Deep Fix; and, as a member of the prog rock band, Hawkwind, won a gold disc. His tenure as editor of New Worlds magazine in the sixties and seventies is seen as the high watermark of SF editorship in the UK, and was crucial in the development of the SF New Wave. Michael Moorcock's literary creations include Hawkmoon, Corum, Von Bek, Jerry Cornelius and, of course, his most famous character, Elric. He has been compared to, among others, Balzac, Dumas, Dickens, James Joyce, Ian Fleming, J.R.R. Tolkien and Robert E. Howard. Although born in London, he now splits his time between homes in Texas and Paris.

Nalini Singh

Nalini Singh was born in Fiji and raised in New Zealand. She spent three years living and working in Japan, and travelling around Asia before returning to New Zealand now - although she's always plotting new trips. She has worked as a lawyer, a librarian, a candy factory general hand, a bank temp and an English teacher, not necessarily in that order. Some people might call that inconsistency, but she calls it grist for the writer's mill.You can learn more by visiting www.nalinisingh.com or by following @NaliniSingh on twitter.

Peter Higgins

Peter Higgins read English at Oxford University and Queen's, Ontario. He was a Junior Research Fellow at Wolfson College, Oxford and worked in the British Civil Service. His short stories have appeared in Fantasy: Best of the Year 2007, Best New Fantasy 2, Asimov's Science Fiction, Fantasy Magazine, Zahir and Revelation, and in Russian translation in the St Petersburg magazine Esli. His first novel was the acclaimed Wolfhound Century. He lives with his family in South Wales.

Terry Goodkind

Terry Goodkind's first novel, Wizard's First Rule, immediately established him as one of the world's bestselling authors. Each subsequent book in the Sword of Truth series sold better than the one before and some twenty million copies of books in the series have now been sold. He lives in the USA.

Terry Pratchett

Sir Terry Pratchett is a publishing phenomenon. Among his many prizes and citations are the World Fantasy Life Achievement Award, the Carnegie Medal, the BSFA Award, eight honorary doctorates and, of course, a knighthood. In 2012, he won a BAFTA for his documentary on the subject of assisted suicide, 'Terry Pratchett: Choosing to Die'. He is the author of fifty bestselling books but is best known for the globally renowned Discworld series. The first Discworld novel, The Colour of Magic, was published in 1983, and the series is still going strong almost three decades later. Four Discworld novels - Hogfather, Going Postal, The Colour of Magic and The Light Fantastic - have been adapted for television, with more to follow. His books have sold approximately 85 million copies worldwide (but who's counting?), and been translated into forty languages. In 2007, Terry Pratchett was diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer's Disease. He died in 2015.