Related to: 'Exodus'

Gollancz

Nemesis

Alex Lamb
Authors:
Alex Lamb

Years ago, one starship and its crew discovered an alien entity which changed everything. Its discovery finally bought an end to the interstellar war being fought between the masses of humanity and the few pockets of genetically engineered colonists. An uneasy peace was negotiated as the human race realised there was something else sharing our universe. Something that had plans for us.But the aliens have remained silent. The earthers have begun to test the edges of the peace treaty. Will, once a roboteer, once a human, now the most powerful being alive, has been sidelined and ignored. And a system-wide conspiracy threatens to plunge humanity back into war.Now one man, his head full of alien technology that lets him interact with machinery, must get to the bottom of the plot, find out what the aliens want, stop the oncoming war and save Will. And his journey will uncover a new threat to humanity.Nemesis is coming.

Gollancz

Roboteer

Alex Lamb
Authors:
Alex Lamb

The starship Ariel is on a mission of the utmost secrecy, upon which the fate of thousands of lives depend. Though the ship is a mile long, its six crew are crammed into a space barely large enough for them to stand. Five are officers, geniuses in their field. The other is Will Kuno-Monet, the man responsible for single-handedly running a ship comprised of the most dangerous and delicate technology that mankind has ever devised. He is the Roboteer. Roboteer is a hard-SF novel set in a future in which the colonization of the stars has turned out to be anything but easy, and civilization on Earth has collapsed under the pressure of relentless mutual terrorism. Small human settlements cling to barely habitable planets. Without support from a home-world they have had to develop ways of life heavily dependent on robotics and genetic engineering. Then out of the ruins of Earth's once great empire, a new force arises - a world-spanning religion bent on the conversion of all mankind to its creed. It sends fleets of starships to reclaim the colonies. But the colonies don't want to be reclaimed. Mankind's first interstellar war begins. It is dirty, dangerous and hideously costly. Will is a man bred to interface with the robots that his home-world Galatea desperately needs to survive. He finds himself sent behind enemy lines to discover the secret of their newest weapon. What he discovers will transform their understanding of both science and civilization forever... but at a cost.

Alena Graedon

Alena Graedon graduated from Brown in 2002 and received her MFA in 2007 from Columbia. She worked as the Manager of Literary Awards and Membership at PEN America Center and, when awarded four fellowships at writing residences, left to finish writing THE WORD EXCHANGE. She is already working on her second novel.

Ben Aaronovitch

Ben Aaronovitch is the author of the Sunday Times bestselling PC Peter Grant series of novels (Rivers of London, Moon Over Soho, Whispers Under Ground, Broken Homes, Foxglove Summer and the upcoming The Hanging Tree).He was born and raised in London, and his love for the city is reflected throughout the series. Ben has also previously written for television and worked as a bookseller.He still resides in London, and is currently working on his next novel. Find out more on his website www.the-folly.com, or follow him on Twitter @Ben_Aaronovitch.

Brian Aldiss

Brian W. Aldiss (1925 - 2017)Brian Wilson Aldiss was born in 1925. He was a highly decorated science fiction author who achieved the rare feat of acceptance as a writer of real significance by the literary establishment in his lifetime. As well as his many award-winning novels he has been a hugely important anthologist and editor in the field. He also wrote the pre-eminent history of the genre (with David Wingrove), Billion Year Spree (later expanded and revised as Trillion Year Spree). He died in 2017 the day after his 92nd birthday.

Brian Phillips

Brian Phillips is a former staff writer for Grantland and former senior writer for MTV News. He has written for The New York Times Magazine, The New Yorker and Slate, among other publications, and his work has appeared in Best American Sports Writing and Best American Magazine Writing. He lives in central Pennsylvania. Impossible Owls is his first book.

Charlaine Harris

CHARLAINE HARRIS is a New York Times bestselling author who has been writing for over thirty-five years. Born and raised in the Mississippi Delta, she is the author of the Aurora Teagarden mysteries, basis for the Hallmark Movies & Mysteries Aurora Teagarden original movies; the Midnight, Texas series, now a brand-new TV series; the Sookie Stackhouse urban fantasy series, basis for the HBO show True Blood; the Lily Bard mysteries; the Harper Connelly mysteries; and the co-author of the graphic novel trilogy Cemetery Girl. Harris now lives in Texas with her husband and two rescue dogs.

Daniel Hillis

Daniel Hillis is one of the world's hottest computer scientists. He was co-founder and chief scientist of the Thinking Machines Corporation and principal architect of the company's major product, the Connection Machine. He is an Editor of several scientific journals, including Artificial Life and Future Generation Computer Systems and is currently Vice President and Disney Fellow at Walt Disney Imagineering.

Daniel Keyes

Daniel Keyes (1927-2014) Daniel Keyes was born in Brooklyn in 1927, and worked as a merchant seaman, editor and university English lecturer. He won the Hugo Award in 1960 for the short story that FLOWERS FOR ALGERNON was based on and the Nebula in 1966 for the full-length novel. In 1968 FLOWERS FOR ALGERNON became the Oscar-winning film CHARLY and has now sold over five million copies worldwide. He died in June 2014.

Edgar Allan Poe

Edgar Allan Poe was an American writer, editor, and literary critic. Poe is best known for his poetry and short stories such as THE FALL OF THE HOUSE OF USHER.

Emiko Jean

Emiko Jean's debut YA fantasy novel Empress of All Seasons is inspired by her Japanese heritage. Emiko lives in the Pacific Northwest with her husband and children. Aside from reading and writing, she loves hiking and travel. Follow her on Twitter: @emikojeanbooks

Frank Herbert

Frank Herbert (1920-86) was born in Tacoma, Washington and worked as a reporter and later editor of a number of West Coast newspapers before becoming a full-time writer. His first SF story was published in 1952 but he achieved fame more than ten years later with the publication in Analog of 'Dune World' and 'The Prophet of Dune' that were amalgamated in the novel Dune in 1965.

Gavin G. Smith

Gavin G. Smith is the Dundee-born author of the hard edged, action-packed SF novels Veteran, War in Heaven, Age of Scorpio, A Quantum Mythology and The Beauty of Destruction, as well as the short story collection Crysis: Escalation. He has collaborated with Stephen Deas as the composite personality Gavin Deas and co-written Elite: Wanted, and the shared world series Empires: Infiltration and Empires: Extraction.

Geoffrey Household

Geoffrey Household was a prolific novelist of political thrillers and suspense stories, most notably the classic ROGUE MALE, which, THE TIMES recently declared, 'remains as exciting and probing as ever'. He was as widely travelled as the settings of his books suggest: after graduating from Magdalen College, Oxford, with a first in English literature he worked abroad for twenty-five years, and served in British Intelligence during World War Two in Greece and the Middle East. He married twice and eventually settled in the English countryside with his wife and three children.

H.G. Wells

H.G. Wells was born in Bromley, Kent in 1866. After working as a draper's apprentice and pupil-teacher, he won a scholarship to the Normal School of Science in 1884, studying under T. H. Huxley. He was awarded a first-class honours degree in biology and resumed teaching but had to retire after a kick from an ill-natured pupil afflicted his kidneys. He worked in poverty in London as a crammer while experimenting in journalism and stories. It was with THE TIME MACHINE (1895) that he had his real breakthrough.

John Gribbin

John Gribbin is a British science writer, astrophysicist and visiting fellow in astronomy at the University of Sussex, where he graduated with a BA in physics in 1966 and did his master of science (MSc) in 1967. He earned his PhD in astrophysics from the University of Cambridge in 1971. Author of the well-known IN SEARCH OF SCHRODINGER'S CAT, Gribbin's work as a scientist is often reflected in his writing which covers a wide range of topics, such as quantum physics, human evolution, the origins of the universe, climate change and global warming.

Karen Anderson

Karen Kruse Anderson was the widow and sometime co-author of Poul Anderson, and mother-in-law of writer Greg Bear. She wrote the first published science fiction haiku (or scifaiku), "Six Haiku" in The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, in July 1962, and is one of the founders of the Society for Creative Anachronism. She was invested as a member of the Baker Street Irregulars, and was active both in Sherlockian groups and in the Los Angeles Science-Fantasy Society. She died in 2018, aged 85.

Kate Wilhelm

Kate Wilhelm (1928-2018) Working name of the US writer Katie Gertrude Meridith Wilhelm Knight, born in Ohio in 1928. She started publishing SF in 1956 with 'The Pint-Sized Genie' for Fantastic, and continued for some time with relatively straightforward genre stories; it was not until the late 1960s that she began to release the mature stories which have made her reputation as one of the 20th century's finest SF writers. She was married to noted author and critic Damon Knight and together they have had a profound influence beyond their writing, through the Milford Science Fiction Writers' Conference and its offshoot, in which she was directly involved, the Clarion Science Fiction Writers' Workshop. She won the Hugo Award for Best Novel with Where Late the Sweet Birds Sang, and has won the Nebula Award three times. Kate Wilhelm died in 2018, aged 89.

Katharine McMahon

Katharine McMahon studied English and Drama at Bristol University, has taught and trained extensively both in creative writing and within the criminal justice system, has served on The Sentencing Council and The Judicial Appointments Commission and currently works for the Royal Literary Fund developing projects that help writers use their unique skills in the community. She is the author of ten novels, including The Alchemist's Daughter and The Crimson Rooms, that focus on astonishing women and their ability to find a voice and make a mark, even at times and in societies when they are risking everything. The Rose of Sebastopol was a Richard & Judy pick and a Sunday Times bestseller.www.katharinemcmahon.com

Kobna Holdbrook-Smith

Kobna Holdbrook-Smith is a Film, Theatre, Television and Radio actor. His television credits include Little Britain, Saxondale, Pulling, Taking the Flak, Star Stories and Sirens; his theatre credits include lead roles at the National, Tricycle, Young Vic, Manchester Royal Exchange, Bush and Shakespeare's Globe theatres and he has also been in numerous BBC radio plays. He has voiced audiobooks by Alastair Reynolds and Ben Aaronovitch for Orion.