Related to: 'Exodus'

Gollancz

Nemesis

Alex Lamb
Authors:
Alex Lamb
Gollancz

Roboteer

Alex Lamb
Authors:
Alex Lamb

The starship Ariel is on a mission of the utmost secrecy, upon which the fate of thousands of lives depend. Though the ship is a mile long, its six crew are crammed into a space barely large enough for them to stand. Five are officers, geniuses in their field. The other is Will Kuno-Monet, the man responsible for single-handedly running a ship comprised of the most dangerous and delicate technology that mankind has ever devised. He is the Roboteer. Roboteer is a hard-SF novel set in a future in which the colonization of the stars has turned out to be anything but easy, and civilization on Earth has collapsed under the pressure of relentless mutual terrorism. Small human settlements cling to barely habitable planets. Without support from a home-world they have had to develop ways of life heavily dependent on robotics and genetic engineering. Then out of the ruins of Earth's once great empire, a new force arises - a world-spanning religion bent on the conversion of all mankind to its creed. It sends fleets of starships to reclaim the colonies. But the colonies don't want to be reclaimed. Mankind's first interstellar war begins. It is dirty, dangerous and hideously costly. Will is a man bred to interface with the robots that his home-world Galatea desperately needs to survive. He finds himself sent behind enemy lines to discover the secret of their newest weapon. What he discovers will transform their understanding of both science and civilization forever... but at a cost.

Ben Aaronovitch

Ben Aaronovitch is the author of the Sunday Times bestselling PC Peter Grant series of novels (Rivers of London, Moon Over Soho, Whispers Under Ground, Broken Homes, Foxglove Summer and the upcoming The Hanging Tree).He was born and raised in London, and his love for the city is reflected throughout the series. Ben has also previously written for television and worked as a bookseller.He still resides in London, and is currently working on his next novel. Find out more on his website www.the-folly.com, or follow him on Twitter @Ben_Aaronovitch.

Bram Stoker

Abraham "Bram" Stoker (1847-l 1912) was an Irish novelist and short story writer, best known today for his 1897 Gothic novel Dracula. During his lifetime, he was better known as the personal assistant of actor Henry Irving and business manager of the Lyceum Theatre in London, which Irving owned.

Clare Corbett

Clare Corbett has had a successful career on stage, screen and radio. Theatre credits include 'To Kill A Mocking Bird' 'Pygmalion' and Spoonface Steinberg' and her TV credits include BBC's 'Spooks,' 'Fastnet' and 'Final Demand'. A winner of the prestigious Carleton Hobbs Radio Award, she has appeared in over 250 radio plays including 'Absolute Power' 'Venus and Adonis' and ' Dr Zhivago'. Her other voice work comprises of Aardman Animation's ' the planet sketch' and numerous audiobooks (children and adult) including 'Poppy Shakespeare', 'Swallowing Grandma' and 'Child X'. She read 'Alys, Always' by Harriet Lane for Orion.

Clifford D. Simak

Clifford D. Simak (1904 -1988)Clifford Donald Simak was born in Wisconsin, in 1904. He attended the University of Wisconsin and spent his working life in the newspaper business. He flirted briefly with science fiction in the early '30s but did not start to write seriously until John W. Campbell's Astounding Stories began to rejuvenate the field in 1937. Simak was a regular contributor to Astounding throughout the Golden Age, producing a body of well regarded work. He won the Nebula and multiple Hugo Awards, and in 1977 was the third writer to be named a Grand Master by SFWA. He died in 1988.

D.G. Compton

D G Compton (1930 - )David Guy Compton was born in London in 1930. His early works were crime novels published under 'Guy Compton', but he began producing SF as 'D.G. Compton' in 1965 with The Quality of Mercy. His 1970 novel The Steel Crocodile received a Nebula nomination, but it was 1974's The Continuous Catherine Mortenhoe that made his reputation. Eerily predictive of the 21st century's obsessions with media voyeurism and 'reality television', it was filmed as Death Watch in 1980. He lives in Maine, in the United States.

Dan Simmons

Dan Simmons won the World Fantasy Award for his first novel, SONG OF KALI, inspired by his travels in India. In the 1990s he rewrote the SF rulebook with his Hyperion Cantos quartet. He has also written thrillers. Alongside his writing he maintains a career as a college lecturer in English Literature in the USA.

Daniel Keyes

Daniel Keyes (1927-2014) Daniel Keyes was born in Brooklyn in 1927, and worked as a merchant seaman, editor and university English lecturer. He won the Hugo Award in 1960 for the short story that FLOWERS FOR ALGERNON was based on and the Nebula in 1966 for the full-length novel. In 1968 FLOWERS FOR ALGERNON became the Oscar-winning film CHARLY and has now sold over five million copies worldwide. He died in June 2014.

David Brin

David Brin is a scientist, speaker, technical consultant and world-known author. His novels have been New York Times Bestsellers, winning multiple Hugo, Nebula and other awards. At least a dozen have been translated into more than twenty languages

Edgar Allan Poe

Edgar Allan Poe was an American writer, editor, and literary critic. Poe is best known for his poetry and short stories such as THE FALL OF THE HOUSE OF USHER.

Eric Brown

Eric Brown is in the GUINNESS BOOK OF RECORDS for having flown more aircraft types (487) than any other pilot in history. His record is unlikely ever to be broken. Captain Brown CBE, DSC, AFC, KCVSA, RN, became a test pilot during the Second World War and commanded the RAE Aerodynamics Flight at Farnborough. He played a key role in the design of an entire generation of aircraft. No other man could have claimed to have interrogated several senior Nazis, flown their jet aircraft or tested so many experimental machines. The Royal Navy's most decorated pilot, Captain Eric Brown died in 2016 at the age of 97.

Gavin G. Smith

Gavin G. Smith is the Dundee-born author of the hard edged, action-packed SF novels Veteran, War in Heaven, Age of Scorpio, A Quantum Mythology and The Beauty of Destruction, as well as the short story collection Crysis: Escalation. He has collaborated with Stephen Deas as the composite personality Gavin Deas and co-written Elite: Wanted, and the shared world series Empires: Infiltration and Empires: Extraction.

Geoffrey Household

Geoffrey Household was a prolific novelist of political thrillers and suspense stories, most notably the classic ROGUE MALE, which, THE TIMES recently declared, 'remains as exciting and probing as ever'. He was as widely travelled as the settings of his books suggest: after graduating from Magdalen College, Oxford, with a first in English literature he worked abroad for twenty-five years, and served in British Intelligence during World War Two in Greece and the Middle East. He married twice and eventually settled in the English countryside with his wife and three children.

Gordon Eklund

Gordon Eklund is an American SF author.

Greg Bear

Greg Bear is one of the world's leading hard SF authors. A multiple Hugo and Nebula award winner, he sold his first short story, at the age of fifteen, to Robert Lowndes's Famous Science Fiction. His novels Blood Music and Eon are both Gollancz Masterworks. A full-time writer, he lives in Washington with his family.

Gregory Benford

Gregory Benford (1941 - ) A leading writer of 'Hard SF', Gregory Albert Benford was born in Alabama in 1941. He received a BSc in physics from the University of Oklahoma, followed by an MSc and PhD from the University of California, San Diego. His breakthrough novel, Timescape, won both the Nebula and John W. Campbell Memorial Awards, and he has been nominated for the Hugo Award four times and the Nebula twelve times in all categories. Benford has undertaken collaborations with David Brin and Arthur C. Clarke among others and, as one of the 'Killer Bs' (with Brin and Greg Bear) wrote one of three authorised sequels to Isaac Asimov's Foundation series. He has also written for television and served as a scientific consultant on Star Trek: The Next Generation. Gregory Benford lives in California, where he is currently Professor of Plasma Physics and Astrophysics at the University of California, Irvine, a position he has held since 1979.

H.G. Wells

H.G. Wells was born in Bromley, Kent in 1866. After working as a draper's apprentice and pupil-teacher, he won a scholarship to the Normal School of Science in 1884, studying under T. H. Huxley. He was awarded a first-class honours degree in biology and resumed teaching but had to retire after a kick from an ill-natured pupil afflicted his kidneys. He worked in poverty in London as a crammer while experimenting in journalism and stories. It was with THE TIME MACHINE (1895) that he had his real breakthrough.

Hannu Rajaniemi

Hannu Rajaniemi is from Finland and has a PhD in String Theory. He lived, taught and worked in Edinburgh for many years where he was a member of the high profile writing group that also included Hal Duncan and Alan Campbell. He currently lives in California. His first novel, THE QUANTUM THIEF was widely and hugely praised and has been published in several countries. As well as writing novels he also works in the areas of number and game theory and artificial intelligence.

John Gribbin

John Gribbin is a British science writer, astrophysicist and visiting fellow in astronomy at the University of Sussex, where he graduated with a BA in physics in 1966 and did his master of science (MSc) in 1967. He earned his PhD in astrophysics from the University of Cambridge in 1971. Author of the well-known IN SEARCH OF SCHRODINGER'S CAT, Gribbin's work as a scientist is often reflected in his writing which covers a wide range of topics, such as quantum physics, human evolution, the origins of the universe, climate change and global warming.