Related to: 'From Darkest Skies'


From Distant Stars

Sam Peters
Sam Peters

Inspector Keon has finally got over the death of his wife Alysha in a terrorist attack five years ago. The illegal AI copy of her - Liss - that he created to help him mourn has vanished, presumed destroyed. His life is back on track. But a deadly shooting in a police-guarded room in a high-security hospital threatens to ruin everything. Who got past the defences? Why did they kill the seemingly unimportant military officer who had been in a coma for weeks? And why did the scanners pick up the deceased man the next day on the other side of the planet, seemingly alive and well?As Keon digs into the mysteries he begins to realise that the death was connected to a mysterious object, potentially alien, discovered buried in ice under the north pole. Someone has worked out what is hidden there, and what its discovery will mean for mankind. Someone who is willing to kill.And another player has entered the game. Someone who seems to know more about Keon than is possible.Someone who might be using Liss's information against him.Or who might be Alysha, back from the dead.

Antonia Fraser

Antonia Fraser is the author of many widely acclaimed historical works which have been international bestsellers. She was awarded the Medlicott Medal by the Historical Association in 2000 and was made a DBE in 2011 for services to literature.Her previous books include Mary Queen of Scots, King Charles II, The Weaker Vessel: Woman's Lot in Seventeenth-Century England, which won the Wolfson History Prize, Marie Antoinette: The Journey, Perilous Question: The Drama of the Great Reform Bill 1832 and The King and the Catholics: The Fight for Rights 1829. Must You Go?, a memoir of her life with Harold Pinter, was published in 2010, and My History: A Memoir of Growing Up in 2015. She lives in London.Visit Antonia Fraser's website at

Flynn Berry

FLYNN BERRY is a graduate of the Michener Center and has been awarded a Yaddo residency. She graduated from Brown University. Her first novel Under the Harrow was awarded the Edgar Award for Best First Novel, and was called 'a triumph' (Sunday Times) and 'thrilling' (New York Times). Her second novel, A Double Life, will be published by W&N in summer 2018.Flynn lives in

Karen Anderson

Karen Kruse Anderson was the widow and sometime co-author of Poul Anderson, and mother-in-law of writer Greg Bear. She wrote the first published science fiction haiku (or scifaiku), "Six Haiku" in The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, in July 1962, and is one of the founders of the Society for Creative Anachronism. She was invested as a member of the Baker Street Irregulars, and was active both in Sherlockian groups and in the Los Angeles Science-Fantasy Society. She died in 2018, aged 85.

Liz Fenwick

Liz Fenwick, award-winning author, ex-pat expert, wife, mother of three, and dreamer turned doer, was born in Massachusetts, and at the age of twenty-six moved to London where she fell in love with an Englishman. After nine international moves, she now spends her time in Cornwall with her husband and her mad cat, writing stories inspired by the beautiful Duchy.Find out more at or follow her on Twitter @liz_fenwick

Lynsay Sands

Lynsay Sands was born in Canada and is an award-winning author of more than 30 books, which have made the Barnes & Noble and NEW YORK TIMES bestseller lists. She is best known for her Argeneau series, about a modern-day family of vampires.

M. M. Kaye

M. M. Kaye (1908-2004) was born in India and spent most of her early childhood and much of her early married life there. Her grandfather, father, brother and husband all served the Raj, and her ties with India remained strong throughout her life. When the country achieved independence her husband joined the British Army and for the next nineteen years she lived in numerous locations around the world, including Kenya, Zanzibar, Egypt, Cyprus and Germany. M. M. Kaye is well known for her highly successful historical novels, The Far Pavilions, Trade Wind and Shadow of the Moon. The Death In . . . series led one American critic to suggest that 'M. M. Kaye outdoes Agatha Christie in palming the ace'. All six titles are available from The Murder Room.

Mark Peterson

Mark Peterson was born in London and studied Literature at the University of Essex. Mark then worked in PR before choosing to re-train as a teacher. He returned to university in 2006 to begin an MA in Creative Writing. It was there that he started to write the novel that would become Flesh and Blood, the first in the Minter series.He now lives in Brighton with his wife and two children.

Michael Connelly

A former police reporter for the Los Angeles Times, Michael Connelly is the internationally bestselling author of the Harry Bosch thriller series. The TV tie-in series - Bosch - is one of the most watched original series on Amazon Prime and is now in its third season. He is also the author of several bestsellers, including the highly acclaimed legal thriller, The Lincoln Lawyer, which was selected for the Richard & Judy Book Club in 2006, and has been President of the Mystery Writers of America. His books have been translated into thirty-nine languages and have won awards all over the world, including the Edgar and Anthony Awards. He spends his time in California and Florida.To find out more, visit Michael's website or follow him on Twitter or

Mickey Spillane

Born Frank Morrison Spillane in Brooklyn, New York City, Mickey Spillane started writing while at high school. During the Second World War, he enlisted in the Army Air Corps and became a fighter pilot and instructor. After the war, he moved to South Carolina. He was married three times, the third time to Jane Rogers Johnson, and had four children and two stepchildren. He wrote his first novel, I, the Jury (1947), in order to raise the money to buy a house for himself and his first wife, Mary Ann Pearce. The novel sold six and a half million copies in the United States, and introduced Spillane's most famous character, the hardboiled PI Mike Hammer. The many novels that followed became instant bestsellers, until in 1980 the US all-time fiction bestseller list of fifteen titles boasted seven by Mickey Spillane. More than 225 million copies of his books have sold internationally. He was uniformly disliked by critics, owing to the high content of sex and violence in his books. However, he was later praised by American mystery writers Max Alan Collins and William L. DeAndrea, as well as artist Markus Lüpertz. The novelist Ayn Rand, a friend of Spillane's, appreciated the black-and-white morality of his books. Spillane was an active Jehovah's Witness. He died in 2006.

Miss Read

Miss Read, or in real life Dora Saint, was a teacher by profession who started writing after the second world war, beginning with light essays written for Punch and other journals. She then wrote on educational and country matters and worked as a scriptwriter for the BBC. Miss Read was married to a schoolmaster for sixty-four years until his death in 2004, and they had one daughter. Miss Read was awarded an MBE in the 1998 New Year Honours list for her services to literature, She was the author of many immensely popular books, including two autobiographical works, but it was her novels of English rural life for which she was best known. The first of these Village School, was published in 1955, and Miss Read continued to write about the fictional villages of Fairacre and Thrush Green for many years. She lived near Newbury in Berkshire until her death in 2012.

Niki Mackay

Niki Mackay studied Performing Arts at the BRIT School, and it turned out she wasn't very good at acting but quite liked writing scripts. She holds a BA (Hons) in English Literature and Drama, and won a full scholarship for her MA in Journalism.

Patrick Rothfuss

Patrick Rothfuss had the good fortune to be born in Wisconsin in 1973, where the long winters and lack of cable television encouraged a love of reading and writing. After abandoning his chosen field of chemical engineering, Pat became an itinerant student, wandering through clinical psychology, philosophy, medieval history, theater, and sociology. Nine years later, Pat was forced by university policy to finally complete his undergraduate degree in English. When not reading and writing, he teaches fencing and dabbles with alchemy in his basement.Patrick Rothfuss is an award-winning as well as Sunday Times and New York Times bestselling author. You can learn more about him and his work at, or by following @PatrickRothfuss on twitter.

Peter Higgins

Peter Higgins read English at Oxford University and Queen's, Ontario. He was a Junior Research Fellow at Wolfson College, Oxford and worked in the British Civil Service. His short stories have appeared in Fantasy: Best of the Year 2007, Best New Fantasy 2, Asimov's Science Fiction, Fantasy Magazine, Zahir and Revelation, and in Russian translation in the St Petersburg magazine Esli. His first novel was the acclaimed Wolfhound Century. He lives with his family in South Wales.

Peter Straub

Peter Straub is the New York Times bestselling author of more than a dozen novels, most recently of A DARK MATTER. LOST BOY LOST GIRL l and IN THE NIGHT ROOM are winners of the Bram Stoker Award. He lives in New York City.

Philip K. Dick

Philip K. Dick (1928-1982) was born in Chicago but lived in California for most of his life. He went to college at Berkeley for a year, ran a record store and had his own classical-music show on a local radio station. He published his first short story, 'Beyond Lies the Wub' in 1952. Among his many fine novels are The Man in the High Castle, Time Out of Joint, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? and Flow My Tears, the Policeman Said.

Poul Anderson

Poul Anderson (1926-2001) was born in Pennsylvania of Scandinavian stock. He started publishing science fiction in 1947 and became one the great figures in the genre, serving as President of the Science Fiction Writers of America, winning multiple Hugo and Nebula awards, and was named a SFWA Grand Master. He collaborated regularly with wife, Karen, and their daughter is married to noted SF writer Greg Bear. Poul Anderson died in July 2001.

Rebecca Shaw

Rebecca Shaw was a former school teacher and the bestselling author of many novels. She lived with her husband in a beautiful Dorset village where she found plenty of inspiration for her stories about rural life. Rebecca sadly passed away in 2015.

Richard Crompton

Richard Crompton is an ex-BBC journalist who moved to East Africa several years ago with his wife, a human rights lawyer who worked on the Rwanda genocide trials. Richard won the Daily Telegraph Short Story Award in 2010.

Richard Morgan

Richard Morgan was, until his writing career took off, a tutor at Strathclyde University in the English Language Teaching division. He has travelled widely and lived in Spain and Istanbul. He is a fluent Spanish speaker. Winner of the Arthur C. Clarke, John W. Campbell and Philip K. Dick Awards his books are published around the world. He lives in Norwich with his family.