Related to: 'Skitter'

Gollancz

The Hatching

Ezekiel Boone
Authors:
Ezekiel Boone

The first female president of the United States is summoned to an emergency briefing.Deep in the jungle of Peru, a black, skittering mass devours an American tourist party whole. FBI agent Mike Rich investigates a fatal plane crash in Minneapolis and makes a gruesome discovery. Unusual seismic patterns register in a Indian earthquake lab, confounding the scientists there. The Chinese government "accidentally" drops a nuclear bomb in an isolated region of its own country. And all of these events are connected. As panic begins to sweep the globe, a mysterious package from South America arrives at Melanie Guyer's Washington laboratory. The unusual egg inside begins to crack. Something is spreading...The world is on the brink of an apocalyptic disaster. An virulent ancient species of spiders, long dormant, is now very much awake. But this is only the beginning of our end...

Andrew Pyper

Andrew Pyper was born in Stratford, Ontario. He received a BA and an MA in English Literature from McGill University in Montreal, as well as a law degree from the University of Toronto. Although called to the bar in 1996, he has never practised law. Andrew is the author of a string of bestselling novels, including LOST GIRLS, which won the Arthur Ellis Award, and THE DEMONOLOGIST, which won the 2014 International Thriller Writers Award for Best Hardcover Novel. Find out more at www.andrewpyper.com or follow him on Twitter @andrewpyper

Cecelia Holland

Cecelia Holland was born in 1943 and is a well-known and acclaimed writer of historical fiction. Floating Worlds is her only SF novel.

Christopher Priest

Christopher Priest's novels have built him an inimitable dual reputation as a contemporary literary novelist and a leading figure in modern SF and fantasy. His novel THE PRESTIGE is unique in winning both a major literary prize (THE JAMES TAIT BLACK AWARD and a major genre prize THE WORLD FANTASY AWARD); THE SEPARATION won both the ARTHUR C. CLARKE and the BRITISH SCIENCE FICTION AWARDS. THE ISLANDERS won both the BSFA and John W. Campbell awards. He was selected for the original BEST OF YOUNG BRITISH NOVELISTS in 1983.

D.G. Compton

D G Compton (1930 - )David Guy Compton was born in London in 1930. His early works were crime novels published under 'Guy Compton', but he began producing SF as 'D.G. Compton' in 1965 with The Quality of Mercy. His 1970 novel The Steel Crocodile received a Nebula nomination, but it was 1974's The Continuous Catherine Mortenhoe that made his reputation. Eerily predictive of the 21st century's obsessions with media voyeurism and 'reality television', it was filmed as Death Watch in 1980. He lives in Maine, in the United States.

Frank Herbert

Frank Herbert (1920-86) was born in Tacoma, Washington and worked as a reporter and later editor of a number of West Coast newspapers before becoming a full-time writer. His first SF story was published in 1952 but he achieved fame more than ten years later with the publication in Analog of 'Dune World' and 'The Prophet of Dune' that were amalgamated in the novel Dune in 1965.

Gavin G. Smith

Gavin G. Smithis the Dundee-born author of the hard edged, action-packed SF novels Veteran, War in Heaven, Age of Scorpio, A Quantum Mythology and The Beauty of Destruction, as well as the short story collection Crysis: Escalation. He has collaborated with Stephen Deas as the composite personality Gavin Deas and co-written Elite: Wanted, and the shared world series Empires: Infiltration and Empires: Extraction.

Geoffrey Household

Geoffrey Household (1900-1988)Geoffrey Household was a prolific novelist of political thrillers and suspense stories, most notably the classic Rogue Male, which, The Times recently declared, 'remains as exciting and probing as ever'. He was as widely travelled as the settings of his books suggest: after graduating from Magdalen College, Oxford, with a first in English literature he worked abroad for 25 years, and served in British Intelligence during World War II in Greece and the Middle East. He married twice and eventually settled in the English countryside with his wife and three children.

George Turner

George Turner (1916-1997) George Reginald Turner was an Australian writer and critic, best known for the science fiction novels written in the later part of his career. His mainstream novel, The Cupboard Under the Stairs won the Miles Franklin Award, Australia's highest literary honour. His best-known SF novel, The Drowning Towers, was published in the UK under the title The Sea and Summer, and won the second Arthur C. Clarke Award in 1988. George Turner was named as a Guest of Honour for the 1999 World Science Fiction Convention held in his home town of Melbourne, but died before the event.

Greg Egan

Greg Egan lives in Perth, Western Australia. He has won the John W. Campbell award for Best Novel and has been short listed for the Hugo three times.

H.G. Wells

H.G. Wells was born in Bromley, Kent in 1866. After working as a draper's apprentice and pupil-teacher, he won a scholarship to the Normal School of Science in 1884, studying under T. H. Huxley. He was awarded a first-class honours degree in biology and resumed teaching but had to retire after a kick from an ill-natured pupil afflicted his kidneys. He worked in poverty in London as a crammer while experimenting in journalism and stories. It was with THE TIME MACHINE (1895) that he had his real breakthrough.

James Blish

James Blish (1921-75) studied microbiology at Rutgers and then served as a medical laboratory technician in the US army during the Second World War. Among his best known books are Cities in Flight, A Case of Conscience, for which he won the Hugo in 1959 for Best Novel, Doctor Mirabilis, Black Easter and The Day After Judgement.

James Morrow

James Morrow is a full-time fiction writer and a former independent filmmaker. His previous works include the critically acclaimed novels The Last Witchfinder, This is the Way the World Ends, Only Begotten Daughter, City of Truth, Towing Jehovah and Blameless in Abaddon. Visit his website at www.jamesmorrow.net.

Jeremy Davidson

Jeremy Davidson is an actor, writer, director, and Audie®-nominated narrator. He currently appears as Chase Moran on Lifetime¿s hit series, Army Wives, and wrote and directed the feature film Tickling Leo. Jeremy also read The Bourne Betrayal and The Bourne Sanction for Hachette Audio.

Jeremy Northam

Jeremy Northam attended the Bristol Old Vic Theatre School and received the prestigious Olivier Award, for outstanding newcomer, for his 1990 performance as Edward Voysey in THE VOYSEY INHERITANCE. In 1994 he made his American film debut in the thriller THE NET with Sandra Bullock, followed by his beloved portrayal of Mr. Knightley in Miramax's EMMA in 1995 starring opposite Gwyneth Paltrow. One of his best known roles was as Ivor Novello in the film GOSFORD PARK and he has also portrayed Sir Thomas More in the successful Showtime series THE TUDORS. Jeremy has read numerous audio books including titles by C.S. Lewis and Henry James and also Dark Matter by Michele Paver, for Orion.

John Gardner

After Colonel Sun (1968) by Kingsley Amis, John Gardner was the next writer to be asked to write further adventures of James Bond. He wrote, like Fleming, fourteen Bond books, plus novelisations of the films GoldenEye and Licence to Kill, from 1981 to 1996.Before becoming an author of fiction in the early 1960s John Gardner was variously a stage magician, a Royal Marine officer, a journalist and, for a short time, a priest in the Church of England. 'Probably the biggest mistake I ever made,' he says. 'I confused the desire to please my father with a vocation which I soon found I did not have.'In all, Gardner had fifty-five novels to his credit - many of them bestsellers. John Gardner died in 2007.For more information about John Gardner and his non-Bond works, visit his website.

John Lee

British narrator John Lee has read audiobooks in almost every conceivable genre, from Charles Dickens to Patrick O'Brian, and from the very real life of Napoleon to the entirely imagined lives of sorcerers and swashbucklers. He has won numerous Audie Awards and AudioFile Earphones Awards, and he was named a Golden Voice by AudioFile in 2009. Lee is also an accomplished stage actor and wrote and coproduced the feature films Breathing Hard and Forfeit.

Justina Robson

Justina Robson is an Arthur C. Clarke shortlisted author of ten SFF novels, including the highly regarded Quantum Gravity series, and was one of the first writers to win amazon.co.uk's Writer's Bursary in 2000. Based in Leeds, she's been shortlisted for multiple international awards and is a sought-after creative writing teacher who has taught at the Arvon Foundation. A graduate of the Clarion West workshops in Seattle (1996) she has been invited to teach there also, though she hasn't made it yet for various practical reasons. She acted as a judge for the Arthur C Clarke awards on behalf of the Science Fiction Foundation in 2006. Her most recently published novel is Glorious Angels, shortlisted for the British Science Fiction Association Best Novel 2015. You can learn more at justinarobson.co.uk or by following @JustinaRobson on Twitter.

Keith Roberts

Keith Roberts (1935-2000) Keith Roberts was an English author and illustrator, who did more than most to define the look of UK Science fiction magazines in the sixties. He won four BFSA awards for his writing and his art, and edited the magazine Science Fantasy (later Impulse) for a time. He was also nominated for Hugo, Nebula (twice) and Arthur C. Clarke awards. He is perhaps best known for his seminal alternative history novel, Pavane, praised by George R. R. Martin: 'No alternate history novel of the past thirty years comes close to equalling Pavane'.

Kristin Cashore

Kristin Cashore is an award-winning author in the fantasy and YA genre. She has an M.A. in children's literature and has lived in Pennsylvania, Florida, Sydney, Cambridge, Austin, Italy and even London before settling, for the moment, in Boston.