Related to: 'The Second Deluge'

Adapted from the novel by award-winning crime author Denise Mina

NEWS: The Field of Blood Returns to BBC1

The Field Of Blood, adapted from the novel by award-winning crime author Denise Mina, returns to BBC1 this week with a stellar cast, including David Morrissey, Katherine Kelly, Jayd Johnson and Ford Kiernan.

Gateway

The Moon Metal

Garrett P. Serviss
Authors:
Garrett P. Serviss

After huge gold deposits were found in Antarctica and gold became common, the world's financial markets went into a tailspin and every currency lost its value. As bankers meet to find a solution they are approached by one Dr. Syx, who has an evil sneer and a source of a new, mysterious metal to replace gold - a metal which only he can produce. It is up to two heroic engineers try to uncover the secret of this new metal...

Gateway

A Columbus of Space

Garrett P. Serviss
Authors:
Garrett P. Serviss
Gateway

Edison's Conquest of Mars

Garrett P. Serviss
Authors:
Garrett P. Serviss

Written as a sequel to Fighters from Mars, an unauthorized and heavily altered version of H. G. Wells's The War of the World, this novel weaves a distinct and astonishing story of humans invading Mars, marking the invention of the space techno-thriller. Presenting a cornucopia of technical ingenuity, Edison's Conquest of Mars marks a variety of firsts in the genre: the first space battle ever to appear in print, the original fictional example of alien abduction, the introduction of the theory that the pyramids were constructed by extraterrestrials, and the first truly functional spacesuits.

Alastair Reynolds

Alastair Reynolds was born in Barry, South Wales, in 1966. He studied at Newcastle and St Andrews Universities and has a Ph.D. in astronomy. He stopped working as an astrophysicist for the European Space Agency to become a full-time writer. REVELATION SPACE and PUSHING ICE were shortlisted for the ARTHUR C. CLARKE AWARD; REVELATION SPACE, ABSOLUTION GAP, DIAMOND DOGS and CENTURY RAIN were shortlisted for the BRITISH SCIENCE FICTION AWARD and CHASM CITY won the BRITISH SCIENCE FICTION AWARD.You can learn more by visiting www.alastairreynolds.com, or by following @AquilaRift on twitter.

Brandon Sanderson

Brandon Sanderson was born in Nebraska in 1975. Since then he has written, amongst others The Mistborn books and begun the internationally bestselling Stormlight Archive. He was also chosen by Robert Jordan's family to complete Jordan's Wheel of Time Sequence. He lives in Utah.Visit his website at http://www.brandonsanderson.com, follow him on Twitter at https://twitter.com/BrandSanderson and like him on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/BrandSanderson. Read his blogs at http://mistborn.blogspot.co.uk andhttp://mistborn.livejournal.com.

C. Robert Cargill

Cargill wrote for Ain't it Cool News for nearly 10 years under the pseudonym Massawyrm, as well as serving as a staff writer for Film.com and Hollywood.com. He appears as the animated character Carlyle on spill.com, where he also hosts a featured podcast. His first screenplay, the critically acclaimed SINISTER, was co-written and directed by Scott Derrickson and starred Ethan Hawke. He recently co-wrote the screenplay for Marvel's DOCTOR STRANGE.

Chris Wooding

Chris Wooding is a full time, award-winning novelist, a YA novelist, and a professional script writer for film and TV. He has travelled extensively, plays bass and guitar (and has recorded several albums) and his novels have been published all over the world.He has penned the Braided Path trilogy, a standalone novel (The Fade) and the Tales of the Ketty Jay series for Gollancz, all of which were critical and commercial successes.Chris Wooding lives in Kent, and you can learn more at www.chriswooding.com.

Emma Newman

Emma Newman writes dark short stories, science fiction, and urban fantasy novels. Between Two Thorns, the first book in Emma's Split Worlds urban fantasy series, was shortlisted for the BFS Best Novel and Best Newcomer awards. Emma's first science-fiction novel, Planetfall, was published in November 2015. A second standalone novel set in the same universe, After Atlas, was nominated for the Clarke Award.Emma is a professional audio book narrator and also co-writes and hosts the Hugo and Alfie Award winning podcast 'Tea and Jeopardy', which involves tea, cake, mild peril and singing chickens. Her hobbies include dressmaking and role playing games. She lives in Bath.

George Turner

George Turner (1916-1997) George Reginald Turner was an Australian writer and critic, best known for the science fiction novels written in the later part of his career. His mainstream novel, The Cupboard Under the Stairs won the Miles Franklin Award, Australia's highest literary honour. His best-known SF novel, The Drowning Towers, was published in the UK under the title The Sea and Summer, and won the second Arthur C. Clarke Award in 1988. George Turner was named as a Guest of Honour for the 1999 World Science Fiction Convention held in his home town of Melbourne, but died before the event.

Harry Harrison

Harry Harrison (1925-2012) Harry Harrison was born Henry Maxwell Dempsey in Connecticut, in 1925. He was the author of a number of much-loved series including the Stainless Steel Rat and Bill the Galactic Hero sequences and the Deathworld Trilogy. He was known as a passionate advocate of Esperanto, the most popular of the constructed international languages, which appears in many of his novels. He published novels for over half a century and was perhaps best known for his seminal novel of overpopulation, Make Room! Make Room!, which was adapted into the cult film Soylent Green.

Ian McDonald

Ian McDonald was born in Manchester in 1960. His family moved to Northern Ireland in 1965. He now lives in Belfast and works in TV production. The author of many previous novels, including the groundbreaking Chaga books set in Africa, Ian McDonald has long been at the cutting edge of SF. RIVER OF GODS won the BSFA award in 2005, BRASYL won in it in 2007 and THE DERVISH HOUSE in 2010.

Kristen Ciccarelli

Kristen Ciccarelli (@SheLuresDragons) hails from Ontario's Niagara Peninsula where she grew up on her grandfather's grape farm. She's made her living as a baker, a bookseller, and a potter, but now writes YA fantasy books about bloodthirsty dragons, girls wielding really cool weapons, and the transformative power of stories.You can learn more at www.kristenciccarelli.com

M. John Harrison

M. John Harrison (1945 - ) Michael John Harrison is the author of, amongst others, the Viriconium stories, The Centauri Device, Climbers, The Course of the Heart, Signs of Life, Light and Nova Swing. He has won the Boardman Tasker Award (Climbers), the James Tiptree Jr Award (Light) and the Arthur C. Clarke Award (Nova Swing). He lives in Shropshire.

Norman Spinrad

Norman Spinrad (1940 - )Norman Richard Spinrad was born in New York City in 1940. He began publishing science fiction in 1963 and has been an important, if sometimes controversial, figure in the genre ever since. He was a regular contributor to New Worlds magazine and, ironically, the cause of its banning by W H Smith, which objected to the violence and profanity in his serialised novel Bug Jack Barron. Spinrad's work has never shied away from the confrontational, be it casting Hitler as a spiteful pulp novelist or satirising the Church of Scientology. In addition to his SF novels, he has written non-fiction, edited anthologies and contributed a screenplay to the second season of Star Trek. In 2003, Norman Spinrad was awarded the Prix Utopia, a life achievement award given by the Utopiales International Festival in Frances, where he now lives.

Phillip Mann

Phillip Mann (1942 - )Phillip Mann was born in Yorkshire in 1942. he studied English and Drama at Manchester University and later in California. He worked for the New China News Agency in Beijing for two years, but since 1969 has lived principally in New Zealand, where he held the position of Professor of Drama at Victoria University, Wellington, until he retired in 1998. His first novel, The Eye of the Queen was published in 1982 and was followed by seven others including the 'Story of the Gardener' and 'A Land Fit for Heroes' sequences. He has had many plays and stories broadcast on Radio New Zealand, which also adapted his Gardener novels Master of Paxwax and Fall of the Families.

S.J. Morden

Dr S. J. Morden has won the Philip K. Dick Award and been a judge on the Arthur C. Clarke Award. He is a bona fide rocket scientist with degrees in Geology and Planetary Geophysics. ONE WAY is the perfect fusion of his incredible breadth of knowledge and ability to write award-winning, razor-sharp science fiction.

Sam Peters

Sam Peters is a mathematician, part-time gentle-person adventurer and occasional screenwriter who has seen faces glaze over at the words 'science fiction' once too often. Inspirations include Dennis Potter, Mary Doria Russell, Lynda La Plante, Neal Stephenson, and Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure. Has more hopes than regrets, more cats than children, watches a lot of violent contact sport and is an unrepentant closet goth.

Stephen Donaldson

Stephen Donaldson lived in India for 13 years with his father, a medical missionary, who worked extensively with lepers; it was here that he conceived the character of Thomas Covenant. He was awarded the John W. Campbell Award as Best Writer of the Year for The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant The Unbeliever, which, with the sequel trilogy, became instant bestsellers. He is also the author of the fantasy duology 'Mordant's Need', the SF epic quintet 'The Gap', and a number of mysteries written under the pseudonym Reed Stephens. He won the World Fantasy Award in 2000. The four books of The Last Chronicles of Thomas Covenant have been acclaimed worldwide.

Terry Pratchett

Sir Terry Pratchett is a publishing phenomenon. Among his many prizes and citations are the World Fantasy Life Achievement Award, the Carnegie Medal, the BSFA Award, eight honorary doctorates and, of course, a knighthood. In 2012, he won a BAFTA for his documentary on the subject of assisted suicide, 'Terry Pratchett: Choosing to Die'. He is the author of fifty bestselling books but is best known for the globally renowned Discworld series. The first Discworld novel, The Colour of Magic, was published in 1983, and the series is still going strong almost three decades later. Four Discworld novels - Hogfather, Going Postal, The Colour of Magic and The Light Fantastic - have been adapted for television, with more to follow. His books have sold approximately 85 million copies worldwide (but who's counting?), and been translated into forty languages. In 2007, Terry Pratchett was diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer's Disease. He died in 2015.

William Gibson

William Gibson was born in South Carolina in 1948. Educated in the USA, he emigrated to Canada in 1968 and retains dual nationality. Gibson began writing in 1977 and burst upon the literary world with his acclaimed first novel, NEUROMANCER, the book that launched the cyberpunk generation, and the first novel to win the holy trinity of science fiction, the Hugo, Nebula and Philip K. Dick Awards. Although best known for his early cyberpunk novels, Gibson's work has continued to evolve over the ensuing years, always casting an astute critical eye on modern societal trends. In 1999 The Guardian praised him as 'probably the most important novelist of the past two decades'. His most recent books include ZERO HISTORY and THE PERIPHERAL.William Gibson's website is www.williamgibsonbooks.com and you can follow him on Twitter at @greatdismal