Related to: 'The Quanderhorn Xperimentations'

Gollancz

Fat

Rob Grant
Authors:
Rob Grant

Rob Grant's new novel is a revelation. After INCOMPETENCE we would all have expected a killingly funny satire. And in its satire of our obsession with body image, of how the media makes us what we are FAT is certainly that.But in its depiction of Grenville, a fat man at his wits end with the need to be thin; of Hayleigh, a teenage girl obsessed with her terror of being fat and of Jeremy, the self-absorbed, self-adoring 'conceptualist' employed to promote the government's new 'Fat Farms' Rob Grant has given us, yes a very, very funny book, but also an immensely moving and personal novel about how we all feel about our bodies.As Grenville deals with the humilation and daily indignity of being fat, as Hayleigh struggles to deal with her anorexia and as Jeremy comes to terms with the dangerous lies at the centre of the government's new health regime FAT takes us on a hilarious and thought-provoking journey through our all-consuming obession with fat.This is a hilariously moving, movingly hilarious novel and marks a massive step-change in Rob Grant's growth as a writer. Here is a hugely commerical new voice in mainstream, high concept, high in poly-saturates, commercial fiction. It's also safe to say that with this new novel, he's writing about what he knows ...

Gollancz

Incompetence

Rob Grant
Authors:
Rob Grant

Daniel Keyes

Daniel Keyes (1927-2014) Daniel Keyes was born in Brooklyn in 1927, and worked as a merchant seaman, editor and university English lecturer. He won the Hugo Award in 1960 for the short story that FLOWERS FOR ALGERNON was based on and the Nebula in 1966 for the full-length novel. In 1968 FLOWERS FOR ALGERNON became the Oscar-winning film CHARLY and has now sold over five million copies worldwide. He died in June 2014.

Edgar Allan Poe

Edgar Allan Poe was an American writer, editor, and literary critic. Poe is best known for his poetry and short stories such as THE FALL OF THE HOUSE OF USHER.

Geoffrey Household

Geoffrey Household was a prolific novelist of political thrillers and suspense stories, most notably the classic ROGUE MALE, which, THE TIMES recently declared, 'remains as exciting and probing as ever'. He was as widely travelled as the settings of his books suggest: after graduating from Magdalen College, Oxford, with a first in English literature he worked abroad for twenty-five years, and served in British Intelligence during World War Two in Greece and the Middle East. He married twice and eventually settled in the English countryside with his wife and three children.

John Gribbin

John Gribbin is a British science writer, astrophysicist and visiting fellow in astronomy at the University of Sussex, where he graduated with a BA in physics in 1966 and did his master of science (MSc) in 1967. He earned his PhD in astrophysics from the University of Cambridge in 1971. Author of the well-known IN SEARCH OF SCHRODINGER'S CAT, Gribbin's work as a scientist is often reflected in his writing which covers a wide range of topics, such as quantum physics, human evolution, the origins of the universe, climate change and global warming.

Jonathan Barnes

Jonathan Barnes graduated from Oxford University with a First in English Literature. He is a remarkable new novelist, and a brilliant, quirky writer, who lives and works in London and is a regular contributor to The Times Literary Supplement.

Justina Robson

Justina Robson is an Arthur C. Clarke shortlisted author of ten SFF novels, including the highly regarded Quantum Gravity series, and was one of the first writers to win amazon.co.uk's Writer's Bursary in 2000. Based in Leeds, she's been shortlisted for multiple international awards and is a sought-after creative writing teacher who has taught at the Arvon Foundation. A graduate of the Clarion West workshops in Seattle (1996) she has been invited to teach there also, though she hasn't made it yet for various practical reasons. She acted as a judge for the Arthur C Clarke awards on behalf of the Science Fiction Foundation in 2006. Her most recently published novel is Glorious Angels, shortlisted for the British Science Fiction Association Best Novel 2015. You can learn more at justinarobson.co.uk or by following @JustinaRobson on Twitter.

Karen Anderson

Karen Kruse Anderson was the widow and sometime co-author of Poul Anderson, and mother-in-law of writer Greg Bear. She wrote the first published science fiction haiku (or scifaiku), "Six Haiku" in The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, in July 1962, and is one of the founders of the Society for Creative Anachronism. She was invested as a member of the Baker Street Irregulars, and was active both in Sherlockian groups and in the Los Angeles Science-Fantasy Society. She died in 2018, aged 85.

Kate Wilhelm

Kate Wilhelm (1928-2018) Working name of the US writer Katie Gertrude Meridith Wilhelm Knight, born in Ohio in 1928. She started publishing SF in 1956 with 'The Pint-Sized Genie' for Fantastic, and continued for some time with relatively straightforward genre stories; it was not until the late 1960s that she began to release the mature stories which have made her reputation as one of the 20th century's finest SF writers. She was married to noted author and critic Damon Knight and together they have had a profound influence beyond their writing, through the Milford Science Fiction Writers' Conference and its offshoot, in which she was directly involved, the Clarion Science Fiction Writers' Workshop. She won the Hugo Award for Best Novel with Where Late the Sweet Birds Sang, and has won the Nebula Award three times. Kate Wilhelm died in 2018, aged 89.

Keith Laumer

Keith Laumer (1925-1993)John Keith Laumer was an American science fiction author born in Syracuse, New York. Prior to his career as a writer, Laumer was an officer in the United States Air Force. After war service, he spent a year at the University of Stockholm, and then took two bachelor's degrees in science and architecture at the University of Illinois. His first story, Greylorn, was published in 1959, but he returned to the Air Force the following year, only becoming a full-time writer in 1965. Laumer was extremely prolific and produced three major series and two minor ones, along with a number of independent novels. After 1973, however, illness meant that he published more sparingly. He died in 1993.

Ken Grimwood

KEN GRIMWOOD (1944-2003) was a radio journalist in California. He was the author of Breakthrough, Elise, The Voice Outside and Into the Deep. He won the World Fantasy Award for Replay.

Kristen Ciccarelli

Kristen Ciccarelli (@SheLuresDragons) hails from Ontario's Niagara Peninsula where she grew up on her grandfather's grape farm. She's made her living as a baker, a bookseller, and a potter, but now writes YA fantasy books about bloodthirsty dragons, girls wielding really cool weapons, and the transformative power of stories.You can learn more at www.kristenciccarelli.com

Lawrence Watt-Evans

Lawrence Watt-Evans (1954- )Lawrence Watt-Evans is the working name of American science fiction and fantasy writer Lawrence Watt Evans. He was born in Arlington, Massachusetts, as the fourth of six children and studied at Bedford High School and Princeton University, although he left the latter without a degree. Watt-Evans began publishing sf in 1975 with "Paranoid Fantasy #1" for American Athiest. He has constructed several scripts for Marvel Comics and has been moderately prolific as a short story writer, with "Why I Left Harry's All-Night Hamburgers" (Asimov's, July 1987) won a 1988 Hugo.

Liz Earle

Liz Earle MBE is one of Britain's most respected and trusted authorities on wellbeing. The award-winning author of over 30 bestselling books on nutrition, diet, beauty and natural healthcare, she co-founded the eponymous global beauty brand Liz Earle Beauty Co. in 1995, before moving back to writing and broadcasting, now publishing the leading quarterly magazine Liz Earle Wellbeing.An expert in feel-good food and eating well to look your good, her straightforward, balanced and well-researched approach has earned her a place as a trusted visionary in the world of wellbeing. With a passion for demystifying science and sharing wellness wisdom, Liz's measured voice of reason has a deservedly large and loyal following in print, on digital, on TV and online.Travelling the globe for research, Liz comes home to roost on an organic farm in the UK's West Country with her husband and five children.

Margaret St Clair

Margaret St Clair (1911-1995)Margaret St Clair was an American science fiction writer who wrote mostly under her own name, but published a number of titles under the pseudonyms Idris Seabright and Wilton Hazzard. Born in Hutchinson, Kansas, St Clair had no siblings and recalled her childhood as 'rather a lonely and bookish one'. She graduated from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1932 and in 1934 she earned a Master of Arts in Greek Classics. Her sf career began with 'Rocket to Limbo' for Fantastic Adventures in November 1946 and by 1950 she had published about 30 more stories. From the outset of her career, St. Clair was aware of her unusual role as a woman writing in a male-dominated field. An article she wrote for Writer's Digest in 1947, about selling stories to the science fiction market, begins: 'Why is science fiction fun to write? At first blush, it doesn't seem attractive, particularly for a woman.' A lifelong supporter of the American Friends Service Committee, she spent her final years at Friends House in Santa Rosa, California. She died in 1995.

Marty Becker

Marty Becker is the resident vet on GOOD MORNING AMERICA and the co-author with Gina Spadafori of WHY DO DOGS DRINK OUT OF THE TOILET? and DO CATS ALWAYS LAND ON THEIR FEET? He lives in Idaho.

Michael Scott Rohan

Michael Scott Rohan (1951 - 2018) Michael Scott Rohan was born in Edinburgh, in 1951, of a French father and Scottish mother, and was educated at the Edinburgh Academy and St.Edmund Hall, Oxford. He is the author of twelve fantasy and science-fiction novels, including the award-winning Winter of the World trilogy, and co-author of two more, as well as short stories and several non-fiction books. His books have appeared throughout Europe, the USA and the rest of the world, and have been republished as eBooks by SF Gateway. Besides writing novels he has been a Times columnist, edited reference books, and reviews and writes about classical music for all the major British music magazines, currently BBC Music Magazine and Opera. He enjoys singing, arguing, beer, Oriental food, travelling, playing with longbows and computers, and hobbies including archaeology and palaeontology. After 2000, diagnosed with incurable illness, he abandoned fiction writing. However, he has managed to continue travelling, throughout Scandinavia, North and South America, and both Antarctica and the Arctic, and he is finishing another fantasy novel. He passed away in 2018.

Murray Constantine

Murray Constantine (1896-1963)Murray Constantine was a pseudonym for the feminist SF writer Katharine Burdekin. Born Katharine Cade, she was the younger sister of Rowena Cade who created the Minack Theatre in Cornwall. In addition to her Utopian and Dystopian fiction, she wrote several children's books, including The Children's Country under the pen name Kay Burdekin. Her best-known work remains Swastika Night, written as Murray Constantine - a pseudonym that was not confirmed until two decades after her death.

Norman Spinrad

Norman Spinrad (1940 - )Norman Richard Spinrad was born in New York City in 1940. He began publishing science fiction in 1963 and has been an important, if sometimes controversial, figure in the genre ever since. He was a regular contributor to New Worlds magazine and, ironically, the cause of its banning by W H Smith, which objected to the violence and profanity in his serialised novel Bug Jack Barron. Spinrad's work has never shied away from the confrontational, be it casting Hitler as a spiteful pulp novelist or satirising the Church of Scientology. In addition to his SF novels, he has written non-fiction, edited anthologies and contributed a screenplay to the second season of Star Trek. In 2003, Norman Spinrad was awarded the Prix Utopia, a life achievement award given by the Utopiales International Festival in Frances, where he now lives.