Related to: 'The House on Vesper Sands'

W&N

The Maker of Swans

Paraic O’Donnell
Authors:
Paraic O’Donnell

'Compulsive reading . . . rich, strange, beautiful' Helen Macdonald, author of H is for Hawk'A strange, new and captivating look at a magical realm . . . Lavishly entertaining' Independent'Enthralling . . . a literary feast' StylistThe world had forgotten Mr Crowe and his mysterious gifts. Until he killed the poet. He lived a secluded life in the fading grandeur of his country estate. His companions were his faithful manservant and his ward, Clara, a silent, bookish girl who has gifts of her own. Now Dr Chastern, the leader of a secret society, arrives at the estate to call Crowe to account and keep his powers in check. But it is Clara's even greater gifts that he comes to covet most. She must learn to use them quickly, if she is to save them all.

Bernhard Schlink

Bernhard Schlink was born in Germany is 1944. A professor of law at Humboldt University, Berlin, and Cardozo Law School, New York, he is the author of the internationally bestselling novels THE READER, which became an Oscar-winning film starring Kate Winslet and Ralph Fiennes, and THE WOMAN ON THE STAIRS; the short story collections FLIGHTS OF LOVE and SUMMER LIES, and several prize-winning crime novels. His latest novel, OLGA, was a #1 bestseller internationally and will be published in English in 2020.He lives in Berlin and New York.

Catriona Ward

CATRIONA WARD was born in Washington, DC and grew up in the United States, Kenya, Madagascar, Yemen, and Morocco. She read English at St Edmund Hall, Oxford and is a graduate of the Creative Writing MA from the University of East Anglia. Her debut novel, RAWBLOOD, won Best Horror Novel at the 2016 British Fantasy Awards, was shortlisted for the Author's Club Best First Novel Award and was selected as a Winter 2016 Fresh Talent title by WHSmith. RAWBLOOD is published in the US and Canada as THE GIRL FROM RAWBLOOD (Sourcebooks, 2017). She lives in London and Devon.

Charles Dickens

Charles John Huffam Dickens was born on February 7, 1812 in Portsmouth, Hampshire, England. In 1824, his father was imprisoned for debt, so Charles was sent to work in a shoe-dye factory. He later became a clerk in a law firm, a shorthand reporter in the courts, and a parliamentary and newspaper reporter. In 1833, Dickens began to contribute short stories and essays to periodicals, heralding the start of a glittering and prolific literary career. He married Catherine Hogarth in 1836, with whom he had nine surviving children before they separated in 1858. Dickens died suddenly at home on June 9, 1870, leaving behind an internationally acclaimed canon of work, including OLIVER TWIST (1837), NICHOLAS NICKLEBY (1838), DAVID COPPERFIELD (1849-50), BLEAK HOUSE (1852-53), LITTLE DORRIT (1855-57), A TALE OF TWO CITIES (1859), GREAT EXPECTATIONS (1860-61) and OUR MUTUAL FRIEND (1864-65). He was buried in Westminster Abbey.

Dan Vyleta

Dan Vyleta is the son of Czech refugees who emigrated to Germany in the late 1960s. After growing up in Germany, he left to attend university in the UK where he completed a PhD in History at King's College, Cambridge. His debut novel, PAVEL & I, gathered immediate international acclaim and was translated into eight languages. His second novel, THE QUIET TWIN, was shortlisted for the Rogers Writers' Trust Fiction Prize, and his third, THE CROOKED MAID, was a finalist for the Scotiabank Giller Prize and won the J.I Segal Award. When not reading or writing novels, Dan Vyleta watches cop shows, or listens to CDs from his embarrassingly large collection of jazz albums. He lives in Stratford-upon-Avon.

Daniel Keyes

Daniel Keyes (1927-2014) Daniel Keyes was born in Brooklyn in 1927, and worked as a merchant seaman, editor and university English lecturer. He won the Hugo Award in 1960 for the short story that FLOWERS FOR ALGERNON was based on and the Nebula in 1966 for the full-length novel. In 1968 FLOWERS FOR ALGERNON became the Oscar-winning film CHARLY and has now sold over five million copies worldwide. He died in June 2014.

David Ebershoff

David Ebershoff is the author of THE ROSE CITY, PASADENA, THE 19TH WIFE and THE DANISH GIRL, which has been made into a film starring Academy Award-winner Eddie Redmayne and directed by the Academy Award-winning director of THE KING'S SPEECH, Tom Hooper. His books have been translated into twenty languages and honoured by the American Academy of Arts and Letters, the Lambda Literary Foundation and the American Library Association. He has taught writing at Princeton, NYU and Columbia, and was Vice President and Executive Editor at Random House for many years.

Edgar Allan Poe

Edgar Allan Poe was an American writer, editor, and literary critic. Poe is best known for his poetry and short stories such as THE FALL OF THE HOUSE OF USHER.

Emily Fridlund

Emily Fridlund grew up in Minnesota. She holds an MFA from Washington University in St. Louis and a PhD in Literature and Creative Writing from the University of Southern California. Her collection of stories, CATAPULT, was chosen by Ben Marcus for the Mary McCarthy Prize. She lives in the Finger Lakes region of New York. HISTORY OF WOLVES is her first novel.

Geoffrey Household

Geoffrey Household was a prolific novelist of political thrillers and suspense stories, most notably the classic ROGUE MALE, which, THE TIMES recently declared, 'remains as exciting and probing as ever'. He was as widely travelled as the settings of his books suggest: after graduating from Magdalen College, Oxford, with a first in English literature he worked abroad for twenty-five years, and served in British Intelligence during World War Two in Greece and the Middle East. He married twice and eventually settled in the English countryside with his wife and three children.

Ian Rankin

Born in the Kingdom of Fife in 1960, Ian Rankin graduated from the University of Edinburgh in 1982, and then spent three years writing novels when he was supposed to be working towards a PhD in Scottish Literature. His first Rebus novel was published in 1987, and the Rebus books are now translated into thirty-six languages and are bestsellers worldwide.Ian Rankin has been elected a Hawthornden Fellow, and is also a past winner of the Chandler-Fulbright Award. He is the recipient of four CWA Daggers including the prestigious Diamond Dagger in 2005. In 2004, Ian won America's celebrated Edgar Award. He has also been shortlisted for the Anthony Award in the USA, won Denmark's Palle Rosenkrantz Prize, the French Grand Prix du Roman Noir and the Deutscher Krimipreis. Ian Rankin is also the recipient of honorary degrees from the universities of Abertay, St Andrews, Edinburgh, Hull and the Open University.A contributor to BBC2's Newsnight Review, he also presented his own TV series, Ian Rankin's Evil Thoughts. Rankin is a No.1 bestseller in the UK and has received the OBE for services to literature, opting to receive the prize in his home city of Edinburgh, where he lives with his partner and two sons. www.ianrankin.net Twitter @Beathhigh

Jean Fullerton

Jean Fullerton is the author of seven historical novels. She is a qualified District and Queen's nurse who has spent most of her working life in the East End of London, first as a Sister in charge of a team, and then as a District Nurse tutor. She is also a qualified teacher and spent twelve years lecturing on community nursing studies at a London university. She now writes full-time. Find out more at www.jeanfullerton.com

Joe Ide

Joe Ide grew up in South Central Los Angeles. His favourite books were the Conan Doyle Sherlock Holmes stories. The idea that a person could face the world and vanquish his enemies with just his intelligence fascinated him. Joe went on to earn a graduate degree and had several careers before writing IQ, his debut novel, inspired by his early experiences and love of Sherlock. Joe lives in Santa Monica, California.www.joeide.com

John-Henri Holmberg

John-Henri Holmberg is a Swdish author, translator and editor. He knew Stieg Larsson for thirty years and wrote THE TATTOOED GIRL: THE ENIGMA OF STIEG LARSSON AND THE SECRETS BEHIND THE MOST COMPELLING THRILLERS OF OUR TIME in collaboration with Dan Bursteing and Arne De Keijzer.

Julia Gregson

Julia Gregson's novel East of the Sun was chosen for the Richard and Judy TV Book Club and became a Sunday Times bestseller in the UK. Previously a journalist for the Sydney Morning Herald, The Times, Good Housekeeping, and Rolling Stone in the USA, Julia is married and lives in Monmouth. To find out more about Julia and her books, visit her website www.juliagregson.net or follow her on Twitter at @juliagregson

Katharine McMahon

Katharine McMahon studied English and Drama at Bristol University, has taught and trained extensively both in creative writing and within the criminal justice system, has served on The Sentencing Council and The Judicial Appointments Commission and currently works for the Royal Literary Fund developing projects that help writers use their unique skills in the community. She is the author of ten novels, including The Alchemist's Daughter and The Crimson Rooms, that focus on astonishing women and their ability to find a voice and make a mark, even at times and in societies when they are risking everything. The Rose of Sebastopol was a Richard & Judy pick and a Sunday Times bestseller.www.katharinemcmahon.com

Kei Miller

Kei Miller was born in Jamaica in 1978. He is the author of three novels, THE SAME EARTH, THE LAST WARNER WOMAN and AUGUSTOWN, several collections of poetry and a book of short stories, THE FEAR OF STONES, which was shortlisted for the Commonwealth Writers' Prize for Best First Book. In 2014, he won the prestigious Forward Prize for Poetry for his collection, THE CARTOGRAPHER TRIES TO MAP A WAY TO ZION. He teaches Creative Writing at Royal Holloway, University of London.

Keith Lee Morris

Keith Lee Morris is a professor of English and Creative Writing at Clemson University, South Carolina. His previous book, THE DART LEAGUE KING, was selected for the Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers programme. His work has appeared in numerous publications including TIN HOUSE, the SOUTHERN REVIEW and the NEW ENGLAND REVIEW.

Leila Aboulela

Leila Aboulela was born in Cairo and grew up in Khartoum. She is the author of four novels: THE TRANSLATOR, MINARET and LYRICS ALLEY, all of which were longlisted for the Orange Prize, and THE KINDNESS OF ENEMIES. LYRICS ALLEY won Novel of the Year at the Scottish Book Awards and was shortlisted for the Commonwealth Writers' Prize, while Aboulela's collection of short fiction, COLOURED LIGHTS, won the Caine Prize. She lives in Aberdeen.

Lezanne Clannachan

Lezanne Clannachan was born in Denmark before moving to England when she was fourteen. After university, she lived in Singapore for several years before moving to London to work in marketing and event management. Lezanne has three children and lives in West Sussex.