Related to: 'My Father's Wake'

A.A. Gill

A. A. Gill (1954-2016) was born in Edinburgh. He was the TV and restaurant critic and regular features-writer for the Sunday Times, a columnist for Esquire and contributor to Australian Gourmet Traveller. His books include A. A. Gill is Away, The Angry Island, Previous Convictions, Table Talk, Paper View, A. A. Gill is Further Away, The Golden Door and Lines in the Sand, as well as two novels and the memoir Pour Me, which was shortlisted for the 2016 PEN Ackerley Prize. The Best of A. A. Gill, a collection of his journalism, was published in 2017.

Adam Rutherford

Dr Adam Rutherford is a science writer and broadcaster. He studied genetics at University College London, and during his PhD on the developing eye, he was part of a team that identified the first genetic cause of a form of childhood blindness. He has written and presented many award-winning series and programmes for the BBC, including the flagship weekly Radio 4 programme INSIDE SCIENCE and THE CURIOUS CASES OF RUTHERFORD & FRY with Dr Hannah Fry. He is the author CREATION, which was shortlisted for the Wellcome Trust Prize, A BRIEF HISTORY OF EVERYONE WHO EVER LIVED, and most recently, THE BOOK OF HUMANS.

Jeremy Wade

John Wade is a British television presenter and author of books on angling. He is known for his television series RIVER MONSTERS, JUNGLE HOOKS and MIGHTY RIVERS. Jeremy Wade has a BSc in zoology from Bristol University and a Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) from the University of Kent. He has worked as a secondary science teacher, a newspaper reporter, and a senior copywriter at an advertising agency. He has written for publications including The Times, Guardian, Sunday Telegraph and BBC Wildlife magazine. He is the author of RIVER MONSTERS and the forthcoming HOW I FISH (2019).

Kate Binchy

Kate Binchy has worked extensively in all media from West End to fringe theatre. Numerous television appearances include RUTH RENDELL MYSTERIES, FATHER TED, PEAK PRACTICE, CASUALTY, POIROT and FAIR CITY. She has appeared in over 500 radio plays, and films such as MRS DALLOWAY and THE LONELY PASSION OF JUDITH HEARNE. She is Maeve's cousin and has read all of Maeve's audiobooks.

Kate Nicholls

Kate was born in England in 1954 and raised in a theatrical family. Kate left home and school age sixteen, and supported herself working at numberless odd jobs, until she began a successful television and theatre career playing leading roles at the RSC and the National Theatre. In her thirties she read a book that changed her life and she gave up acting to study biology. Between 1976 and 1994, she had six children with whom she has travelled widely.

Katherine May

Katherine May writes fiction and memoir, and is also known as Betty Herbert (The 52 Seductions). She lives in Whitstable with her husband and son, is obsessed with Devon, and loves gin martinis, the sea and walking until her legs ache. She was diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder in 2016.Katherine began her literary career as a resident writer for Tate Britain's education programme, and until recently ran the Creative Writing programmes at Canterbury Christ Church University.Twitter: @_katherine_may_Instagram: @katherinemay_Website: http://how-to-walk.com/

Kerry Young

Kerry Young was born in Kingston, Jamaica, and moved to England in 1965. She is the author of three novels, all available from Bloomsbury: PAO, shortlisted for the Costa First Novel Award and the Commonwealth Book Prize; GLORIA, which was longlisted for the OCM Bocas Prize for Caribbean Literature and nominated for the international IMPAC Dublin Literary Award; and SHOW ME A MOUNTAIN. Kerry is a reader for The Literary Consultancy, a tutor for The Arvon Foundation, and a Royal Literary Fund Fellow. She is also Honorary Assistant Professor in the School of English at the University of Nottingham and Honorary Creative Writing Fellow at the University of Leicester.

L. J. Ganser

L.J. Ganser has narrated over 300 books which have taken him figuratively under, over, around and out of this world, soaring into the future and plunging into the past. L.J. has won an Audie award from the APA, the Scourby award from AFB and many earphone awards from Audiofile magazine.

Laura Freeman

Laura Freeman writes for the SPECTATOR, THE TIMES, SUNDAY TIMES, DAILY TELEGRAPH, TLS, EVENING STANDARD and APOLLO. She was shortlisted for Features Writer of the Year at the 2014 British Press Awards. She read history of art at Cambridge, graduating with a double first in 2010.

Maeve Binchy

Maeve Binchy was born in County Dublin and educated at the Holy Child convent in Killiney and at University College, Dublin. After a spell as a teacher she joined the Irish Times. Her first novel, Light a Penny Candle, was published in 1982 and she went on to write over twenty books, all of them bestsellers. Several have been adapted for cinema and television, most notably Circle of Friends and Tara Road. Maeve Binchy received a Lifetime Achievement Award at the British Book Awards in 1999 and the Irish PEN/A.T. Cross award in 2007. In 2010 she was presented with the Bob Hughes Lifetime Achievement Award at the Bord Gáis Irish Book Awards by the President of Ireland. She was married to the writer and broadcaster Gordon Snell for 35 years, and died in 2012. Visit her website at www.maevebinchy.com

Maggie Hartley

Maggie Hartley has fostered more than 300 children while being a foster carer for over twenty years. Taking on the children other carers often can't cope with, Maggie helps children that are deemed 'unadoptable' because of their behaviour or the extreme trauma that they've been through. She's looked after refugees, supported children through sexual abuse and violence court cases, cared for teenagers on remand and taught young mums how to parent their newborn babies.

Malala Yousafzai

Malala Yousafzai is a cofounder and board member of Malala Fund. Malala began her campaign for education at age eleven, when she anonymously blogged for BBC Urdu about life under the Taliban in Pakistan's Swat Valley. Inspired by her father's activism, Malala soon began advocating publicly for girls' education, attracting international media attention and awards. At age fifteen, she was attacked by the Taliban for speaking out. Malala recovered in the United Kingdom and continued her fight for girls. In 2013, she founded Malala Fund with her father, Ziauddin. A year later, Malala received the Nobel Peace Prize in recognition of her efforts to see every girl complete twelve years of free, safe and quality education. She is currently a student at Oxford University, pursuing a degree in philosophy, politics and economics.

Mari Hannah

Mari Hannah is a multi-award-winning author whose authentic voice is no happy accident. A former probation officer, she lives in rural Northumberland with her partner, an ex-murder detective. Mari turned to script-writing when her career was cut short following an assault on duty. Her debut, The Murder Wall (adapted from a script she developed with the BBC) won her the Polari First Book Prize. Its follow-up, Settled Blood, picked up a Northern Writers' Award. Her Kate Daniels series is in development with Stephen Fry's production company, Sprout Pictures. She is currently Reader in Residence for Harrogate International Crime Writing Festival. Mari's body of work won her the CWA Dagger in the Library 2017, an incredible honour to receive so early on in her career.

Maria Whatton

Maria Whatton was born in Liverpool and moved to the Midlands in the 1990s where she married a Birmingham firefighter and raised a family. She is a multi-award-winning storyteller who tours nationally and internationally telling ancient legends and folk tales. She lectures and performs in theatres, festivals and educational establishments.

Mark Kermode

Mark Kermode is Chief Film Critic for the OBSERVER and co-host of Kermode and Mayo's Film Review on BBC Radio 5 Live. He is the author of IT'S ONLY A MOVIE; THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE MULTIPLEX; THE MOVIE DOCTORS (with Simon Mayo); HATCHET JOB, hailed by Stephen Fry as 'the finest film critic in Britain at the absolute top of his form' and HOW DOES IT FEEL?, a memoir about his life in music. He plays double bass and harmonica in The Dodge Brothers, the award-winning skiffle-and-blues band, who also accompany silent movies. He has written and presented film and music shows on Channel 4 and across BBC radio and television. He holds two Sony Awards for his radio programmes, and The Dodge Brothers album The Sun Set was voted Blues Album of the Year 2013 by the roots music magazine SPIRAL EARTH.

Michael Connelly

A former police reporter for the Los Angeles Times, Michael Connelly is the internationally bestselling author of the Harry Bosch series, and several other bestsellers including the highly acclaimed legal thriller, The Lincoln Lawyer. The TV series - Bosch - is one of the most watched original series on Amazon Prime and is now in its fourth season. He has been President of the Mystery Writers of America, and his books have been translated into thirty-nine languages. His writing has won awards all over the world, including the Edgar and Anthony Awards, and, most recently, the CWA Diamond Dagger 2018, the highest honour in British crime writing. He spends his time in California and Florida. To find out more, visit Michael's website or follow him on Twitter of Facebook. www.michaelconnelly.comf/MichaelConnellyBookst@Connellybooks

Michel Bussi

Michel Bussi is the author of the bestsellers AFTER THE CRASH and BLACK WATER LILIES, both of which were Waterstones Thriller of the Month. In France, where he has published ten novels, he is the second bestselling author overall, with over a million novels sold in 2016 alone, and he has won over sixteen literary awards. When not writing fiction, he is a Professor of Geography at the University of Rouen.

Miss Read

Miss Read, or in real life Dora Saint, was a teacher by profession who started writing after the second world war, beginning with light essays written for Punch and other journals. She then wrote on educational and country matters and worked as a scriptwriter for the BBC. Miss Read was married to a schoolmaster for sixty-four years until his death in 2004, and they had one daughter. Miss Read was awarded an MBE in the 1998 New Year Honours list for her services to literature, She was the author of many immensely popular books, including two autobiographical works, but it was her novels of English rural life for which she was best known. The first of these Village School, was published in 1955, and Miss Read continued to write about the fictional villages of Fairacre and Thrush Green for many years. She lived near Newbury in Berkshire until her death in 2012.

Nathan H. Lents

Nathan H. Lents is a professor of biology at John Jay College at The City University of New York. He is the author of NOT SO DIFFERENT and HUMAN ERRORS.

Nicholas Crane

Nicholas Crane is an author, geographer, cartographic expert and recipient of the Royal Scottish Geographical Society's Mungo Park Medal in recognition of outstanding contributions to geographical knowledge, and of the Royal Geographical Society's Ness Award for popularising geography and the understanding of Britain. He has presented several acclaimed series on BBC2, among them Map Men, Town, Britannia and Coast. He was elected President of the Royal Geographical Society in 2015.Follow him on Twitter at https://twitter.com/nicholascrane.