Related to: 'Earth Abides'

Adam Roberts

Adam Roberts is commonly described as one of the UK's most important writers of SF. He is the author of numerous novels and literary parodies. He is Professor of 19th Century Literature at Royal Holloway, London University and has written a number of critical works on both SF and 19th Century poetry. He is a contributor to the SF ENCYCLOPEDIA.

Alastair Reynolds

Alastair Reynolds was born in Barry, South Wales, in 1966. He studied at Newcastle and St Andrews Universities and has a Ph.D. in astronomy. He stopped working as an astrophysicist for the European Space Agency to become a full-time writer. REVELATION SPACE and PUSHING ICE were shortlisted for the ARTHUR C. CLARKE AWARD; REVELATION SPACE, ABSOLUTION GAP, DIAMOND DOGS and CENTURY RAIN were shortlisted for the BRITISH SCIENCE FICTION AWARD and CHASM CITY won the BRITISH SCIENCE FICTION AWARD.You can learn more by visiting www.alastairreynolds.com, or by following @AquilaRift on twitter.

Arkady Strugatsky

Arkady Strugatsky (1925-1991) and Boris Strugatsky (1931-2012) Arkady and Boris Strugatsky began to collaborate in the early 1950s after Arkady had studied English and Japanese and worked as a technical translator and editor, and Boris was a computer mathematician at Pulkova astronomical observatory. The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction describes them as 'the best Soviet SF writers' and works such as Hard to be a God, Definitely Maybe, The Snail on the Slope and Monday Begins on Saturday are powerful and poignant novels that continue to amaze and move readers. Andrei Tarkovsky's much admired film, Stalker, was based on their most famous work, Roadside Picnic.Read more at http://sf-encyclopedia.com/entry/strugatski_arkady

Arthur C. Clarke

Arthur C. Clarke was born in Minehead in 1917. During the Second World War he served as an RAF radar instructor, rising to the rank of Flight-Lieutenant. After the war he won a BSc in physics and mathematics with first class honours from King's College, London. One of the most respected of all science-fiction writers, he also won the KALINGA PRIZE, the AVIATION SPACE-WRITERS PRIZE,and the WESTINGHOUSE SCIENCE WRITING PRIZE. He also shared an OSCAR nomination with Stanley Kubrick for the screenplay of 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY, which was based on his story, 'The Sentinel'. He lived in Sri Lanka from 1956 until his death in 2008. To discover more about how the legacy of Sir Arthur is being honoured today, please visit http://www.clarkefoundation.org

Boris Strugatsky

Arkady Strugatsky (1925-1991) and Boris Strugatsky (1931-2012) Arkady and Boris Strugatsky began to collaborate in the early 1950s after Arkady had studied English and Japanese and worked as a technical translator and editor, and Boris was a computer mathematician at Pulkova astronomical observatory. The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction describes them as 'the best Soviet SF writers' and works such as Hard to be a God, Definitely Maybe, The Snail on the Slope and Monday Begins on Saturday are powerful and poignant novels that continue to amaze and move readers. Andrei Tarkovsky's much admired film, Stalker, was based on their most famous work, Roadside Picnic.

C.L. Moore

C.L. Moore (1911-1987) was born in Indianapolis and became a leading author of science fantasies for WEIRD TALES in the 1930s. After her marriage to fellow SF writer Henry Kuttner in 1940 she concentrated on writing science fiction, usually in collaboration with her husband. She turned to screenwriting after his untimely death; her TV series included MAVERICK and 77 SUNSET STRIP.

Christopher Priest

Christopher Priest's novels have built him an inimitable dual reputation as a contemporary literary novelist and a leading figure in modern SF and fantasy. His novel THE PRESTIGE is unique in winning both a major literary prize (THE JAMES TAIT BLACK AWARD and a major genre prize THE WORLD FANTASY AWARD); THE SEPARATION won both the ARTHUR C. CLARKE and the BRITISH SCIENCE FICTION AWARDS. THE ISLANDERS won both the BSFA and John W. Campbell awards. He was selected for the original BEST OF YOUNG BRITISH NOVELISTS in 1983.

Daniel Keyes

Daniel Keyes (1927-2014) Daniel Keyes was born in Brooklyn in 1927, and worked as a merchant seaman, editor and university English lecturer. He won the Hugo Award in 1960 for the short story that FLOWERS FOR ALGERNON was based on and the Nebula in 1966 for the full-length novel. In 1968 FLOWERS FOR ALGERNON became the Oscar-winning film CHARLY and has now sold over five million copies worldwide. He died in June 2014.

Ezekiel Boone

Ezekiel Boone lives in upstate New York with his wife and children. He is the author of THE HATCHING, SKITTER, and ZERO DAY.

George Turner

George Turner (1916-1997) George Reginald Turner was an Australian writer and critic, best known for the science fiction novels written in the later part of his career. His mainstream novel, The Cupboard Under the Stairs won the Miles Franklin Award, Australia's highest literary honour. His best-known SF novel, The Drowning Towers, was published in the UK under the title The Sea and Summer, and won the second Arthur C. Clarke Award in 1988. George Turner was named as a Guest of Honour for the 1999 World Science Fiction Convention held in his home town of Melbourne, but died before the event.

Henry Kuttner

Henry Kuttner (1915 -1958)Henry Kuttner was born in Los Angeles, in 1915. As a young man he worked for the literary agency of his uncle, Laurence D'Orsay, before selling his first story, 'The Graveyard Rats', to Weird Tales in early 1936. In 1940 Kuttner married fellow writer C. L. Moore, whom he met through the 'Lovecraft Circle'", a group of writers and fans who corresponded with H. P. Lovecraft. During the Second World War, they were regular contributors to John W. Campbell's Astounding Science-Fiction, and collaborated for most of the 40's and 50's, publishing primarily under the pseudonyms Lewis Padgett and Lawrence O'Donnell. In 1950 he began studying at the University of Southern California, graduating in 1954. He was working towards his masters degree but died of a heart attack in 1958, before it was completed. For more information see www.sf-encyclopedia.com/entry/kuttner_henry

Justin Cronin

Born and raised in New England, Justin Cronin is a multi-award-winning writer. He is Professor of English at Rice University, and lives with his family in Houston, Texas.

Ken Grimwood

KEN GRIMWOOD (1944-2003) was a radio journalist in California. He was the author of Breakthrough, Elise, The Voice Outside and Into the Deep. He won the World Fantasy Award for Replay.

Kobna Holdbrook-Smith

Kobna Holdbrook-Smith is a film, television, theatre and voice actor. During his career he has voiced many books including all of Ben Aaronovitch's best-selling Nightingale and Grant series, many BBC and independent radio plays and one or two lifts. On stage he has played leads at the National, Royal Court, Young Vic, Royal Exchange and Tricycle theatres and most recently was Ike turner in the original West End production of Tina Turner the Musical and Laertes in Hamlet at the Barbican Theatre, opposite Benedict Cumberbatch. Films include: Mary Poppins Returns, Dr. Strange, Justice League, Paddington 2, The Commuter, Ghost Stories, Gwen and The Double. TV includes: The Split, Dark Heart, Class, Capital, The Last Panthers, Sirens and Little Britain. Kobna is also a trustee of the children's education charity Dramatic Need, and an associate director of the National Theatre.

Kristen Ciccarelli

Kristen Ciccarelli (@SheLuresDragons) hails from Ontario's Niagara Peninsula where she grew up on her grandfather's grape farm. She's made her living as a baker, a bookseller, and a potter, but now writes YA fantasy books about bloodthirsty dragons, girls wielding really cool weapons, and the transformative power of stories.You can learn more at www.kristenciccarelli.com

Michael Scott Rohan

Michael Scott Rohan (1951 - 2018) Michael Scott Rohan was born in Edinburgh, in 1951, of a French father and Scottish mother, and was educated at the Edinburgh Academy and St.Edmund Hall, Oxford. He is the author of twelve fantasy and science-fiction novels, including the award-winning Winter of the World trilogy, and co-author of two more, as well as short stories and several non-fiction books. His books have appeared throughout Europe, the USA and the rest of the world, and have been republished as eBooks by SF Gateway. Besides writing novels he has been a Times columnist, edited reference books, and reviews and writes about classical music for all the major British music magazines, currently BBC Music Magazine and Opera. He enjoys singing, arguing, beer, Oriental food, travelling, playing with longbows and computers, and hobbies including archaeology and palaeontology. After 2000, diagnosed with incurable illness, he abandoned fiction writing. However, he has managed to continue travelling, throughout Scandinavia, North and South America, and both Antarctica and the Arctic, and he is finishing another fantasy novel. He passed away in 2018.

R. A. Lafferty

R. A. Lafferty (1914-2002)Raphael Aloysius Lafferty was an American science fiction and fantasy writer born in Neola, Iowa. His first publication of genre interest was 'Day of the Glacier' with Science Fiction Stories in January 1960, although he continued to work in the electrical business until retiring to write full-time in 1970. Over the course of his writing career, Lafferty wrote thirty-two novels and more than two hundred short stories and he was known for his original use of language, metaphor and narrative structure.

Richard Morgan

Richard Morgan was, until his writing career took off, a tutor at Strathclyde University in the English Language Teaching division. He has travelled widely and lived in Spain and Istanbul. He is a fluent Spanish speaker. Winner of the Arthur C. Clarke, John W. Campbell and Philip K. Dick Awards his books are published around the world. He lives in Norwich with his family.

Robert E. Howard

Robert E. Howard (1906-1936) was born and raised in rural Texas, the son of a pioneer physician. He began writing professionally at the age of fifteen and turned out dozens of tales of heroic and supernatural fantasy, featuring many memorable creations - including the character he is best remembered for: Conan of Cimmeria. These stories, mostly published in Weird Tales, won him a huge audience across the world and influenced a whole generation of writers, from Robert Jordan to Raymond E. Feist. Sadly, Howard killed himself in June 1936 when he learned that his beloved mother had fallen into a coma.

Tom Toner

Tom Toner was born in Somerset, England, in 1986. The Tropic of Eternity is the concluding volume in Toner's debut trilogy, following The Promise of the Child and The Weight of the World.